Reading Holiday

Bookstack
Susan here, dusting off a Wench Classic post for today… and since I just sent in a manuscript a few days ago, the topic seems completely appropriate!  I am once again gearing up for a reading binge, having finished my latest — I always look forward to just reading-reading-reading once I've finished writing-writing-writing. And I would love some recommendations. 

… I've just finished another manuscript, with the last section written at top speed deep into the night (which is unfortunately the best writing mode for me). I tried a more civilized pace, but eventually with every book, I gotta kick the writing engines into overdrive. I'm hardwired as a Hare, making a wild and crazy dash for the finish line… this time I really tried to be a Tortoise, organized and all, but I plodded along, not very inspired, until I let the inner rabbit run free. And now I'm tired and ready for some rest, and ready to start a new writing project.

But before that happens … I'm taking a reading holiday!

Stevens Girl Reading
I have a real craving, a need-to-read, so all else will go on hold for a while … housework (lots of that after a book goes in), shopping, email, TV (OK maybe not Dancing With The Stars, on which I am *shamelessly* hooked)… nope, I'm scanning bookshelves in my house and poring through my stacks of To-Be-Reads looking for just the right read. And the craving will soon drive me out to the bookstores and libraries (even on cold and rainy nights) in the search for the sometimes elusive satisfying read ….

So there it is. I'm all set to plunge into a substantial reading frenzy, and I need your help. There's a zillion books in my house, and a pretty fair number of TBR's, and yet — I'm not sure WHAT I want to read. I want something new. I want something unexpected.

So I hope you'll tell us …

What are you reading now that you love, love, love? (and can't wait to recommend?)

What have you read lately that has thrilled you, surprised you? What characters have camped out in your mind and heart?

Books2
What are you reading that is new for you — a new genre, a new author, a new twist on a familiar theme?

Have you read an oldie lately, a favorite comfort read? What do you turn to when you need a relaxing read with a familiar author voice and familiar characters?

Pierre-Auguste Cot Girl with a Book
Have you read something lately that sucked you in and didn't let go until the last page?

What have you put on your keeper shelf lately?

So there you go — tell us what books have grabbed you lately! I'm looking for recommendations… and this way we'll all get some great suggestions!

Thank you!

Susan

 

 

95 thoughts on “Reading Holiday”

  1. It’s not what I’m reading, it’s what I’m reading ON. I purchased a color Nook for a cruise earlier this year and now I’m hooked. I can read anywhere – in a dark car, in a dark bedroom, etc. And, I can SHOP wherever there is a Wi-Fi connection. So if I’m feeling the urge for a book, I just hop up on the Web and download it.
    I really thought I would miss the actual “book-in-hand” experience, but that’s not the case at all.
    I did just finish the last of Eileen’s Dreyer’s “Drake’s Rakes” series and loved it. I’m so happy Eileen has moved into historicals.

    Reply
  2. It’s not what I’m reading, it’s what I’m reading ON. I purchased a color Nook for a cruise earlier this year and now I’m hooked. I can read anywhere – in a dark car, in a dark bedroom, etc. And, I can SHOP wherever there is a Wi-Fi connection. So if I’m feeling the urge for a book, I just hop up on the Web and download it.
    I really thought I would miss the actual “book-in-hand” experience, but that’s not the case at all.
    I did just finish the last of Eileen’s Dreyer’s “Drake’s Rakes” series and loved it. I’m so happy Eileen has moved into historicals.

    Reply
  3. It’s not what I’m reading, it’s what I’m reading ON. I purchased a color Nook for a cruise earlier this year and now I’m hooked. I can read anywhere – in a dark car, in a dark bedroom, etc. And, I can SHOP wherever there is a Wi-Fi connection. So if I’m feeling the urge for a book, I just hop up on the Web and download it.
    I really thought I would miss the actual “book-in-hand” experience, but that’s not the case at all.
    I did just finish the last of Eileen’s Dreyer’s “Drake’s Rakes” series and loved it. I’m so happy Eileen has moved into historicals.

    Reply
  4. It’s not what I’m reading, it’s what I’m reading ON. I purchased a color Nook for a cruise earlier this year and now I’m hooked. I can read anywhere – in a dark car, in a dark bedroom, etc. And, I can SHOP wherever there is a Wi-Fi connection. So if I’m feeling the urge for a book, I just hop up on the Web and download it.
    I really thought I would miss the actual “book-in-hand” experience, but that’s not the case at all.
    I did just finish the last of Eileen’s Dreyer’s “Drake’s Rakes” series and loved it. I’m so happy Eileen has moved into historicals.

    Reply
  5. It’s not what I’m reading, it’s what I’m reading ON. I purchased a color Nook for a cruise earlier this year and now I’m hooked. I can read anywhere – in a dark car, in a dark bedroom, etc. And, I can SHOP wherever there is a Wi-Fi connection. So if I’m feeling the urge for a book, I just hop up on the Web and download it.
    I really thought I would miss the actual “book-in-hand” experience, but that’s not the case at all.
    I did just finish the last of Eileen’s Dreyer’s “Drake’s Rakes” series and loved it. I’m so happy Eileen has moved into historicals.

    Reply
  6. I just got a Nook also. Never thought I would. One thing, a con…you can’t read a nook when the battery is dead unlike a book, which you can just open up. Learned that over the weekend. Book that has caught my eye and it’s because of the title: The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley.

    Reply
  7. I just got a Nook also. Never thought I would. One thing, a con…you can’t read a nook when the battery is dead unlike a book, which you can just open up. Learned that over the weekend. Book that has caught my eye and it’s because of the title: The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley.

    Reply
  8. I just got a Nook also. Never thought I would. One thing, a con…you can’t read a nook when the battery is dead unlike a book, which you can just open up. Learned that over the weekend. Book that has caught my eye and it’s because of the title: The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley.

    Reply
  9. I just got a Nook also. Never thought I would. One thing, a con…you can’t read a nook when the battery is dead unlike a book, which you can just open up. Learned that over the weekend. Book that has caught my eye and it’s because of the title: The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley.

    Reply
  10. I just got a Nook also. Never thought I would. One thing, a con…you can’t read a nook when the battery is dead unlike a book, which you can just open up. Learned that over the weekend. Book that has caught my eye and it’s because of the title: The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley.

    Reply
  11. I read–and gave a five-star review to Eileen Dreyer’s Always a Temptress last week. Kate has become one of my favorite historical heroines.
    I also read Pat’s The Lure of Song and Magic (via NetGalley) and loved it so much that it made me want to reread her Magic books. I started Merely Magic today.
    Kay, I’ve enjoyed all three of Bradley’s Flavia de Luce books and am looking forward to the next three, but I think The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie is the best one.
    I’m also slowly reading Eric Metaxas’s biography of Dietrich Bonhoeffer. It’s fascinating and moving.

    Reply
  12. I read–and gave a five-star review to Eileen Dreyer’s Always a Temptress last week. Kate has become one of my favorite historical heroines.
    I also read Pat’s The Lure of Song and Magic (via NetGalley) and loved it so much that it made me want to reread her Magic books. I started Merely Magic today.
    Kay, I’ve enjoyed all three of Bradley’s Flavia de Luce books and am looking forward to the next three, but I think The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie is the best one.
    I’m also slowly reading Eric Metaxas’s biography of Dietrich Bonhoeffer. It’s fascinating and moving.

    Reply
  13. I read–and gave a five-star review to Eileen Dreyer’s Always a Temptress last week. Kate has become one of my favorite historical heroines.
    I also read Pat’s The Lure of Song and Magic (via NetGalley) and loved it so much that it made me want to reread her Magic books. I started Merely Magic today.
    Kay, I’ve enjoyed all three of Bradley’s Flavia de Luce books and am looking forward to the next three, but I think The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie is the best one.
    I’m also slowly reading Eric Metaxas’s biography of Dietrich Bonhoeffer. It’s fascinating and moving.

    Reply
  14. I read–and gave a five-star review to Eileen Dreyer’s Always a Temptress last week. Kate has become one of my favorite historical heroines.
    I also read Pat’s The Lure of Song and Magic (via NetGalley) and loved it so much that it made me want to reread her Magic books. I started Merely Magic today.
    Kay, I’ve enjoyed all three of Bradley’s Flavia de Luce books and am looking forward to the next three, but I think The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie is the best one.
    I’m also slowly reading Eric Metaxas’s biography of Dietrich Bonhoeffer. It’s fascinating and moving.

    Reply
  15. I read–and gave a five-star review to Eileen Dreyer’s Always a Temptress last week. Kate has become one of my favorite historical heroines.
    I also read Pat’s The Lure of Song and Magic (via NetGalley) and loved it so much that it made me want to reread her Magic books. I started Merely Magic today.
    Kay, I’ve enjoyed all three of Bradley’s Flavia de Luce books and am looking forward to the next three, but I think The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie is the best one.
    I’m also slowly reading Eric Metaxas’s biography of Dietrich Bonhoeffer. It’s fascinating and moving.

    Reply
  16. I just finished a fabulous set of two books by Michael Cox, called “The Meaning of Night” and “The Glass of Time”. They were atmospheric Victorian suspense (with some romance thrown in, of course). I recommend them to one and all. They were beautifully written and deeply satisfying. Whatever you choose, happy reading to you!

    Reply
  17. I just finished a fabulous set of two books by Michael Cox, called “The Meaning of Night” and “The Glass of Time”. They were atmospheric Victorian suspense (with some romance thrown in, of course). I recommend them to one and all. They were beautifully written and deeply satisfying. Whatever you choose, happy reading to you!

    Reply
  18. I just finished a fabulous set of two books by Michael Cox, called “The Meaning of Night” and “The Glass of Time”. They were atmospheric Victorian suspense (with some romance thrown in, of course). I recommend them to one and all. They were beautifully written and deeply satisfying. Whatever you choose, happy reading to you!

    Reply
  19. I just finished a fabulous set of two books by Michael Cox, called “The Meaning of Night” and “The Glass of Time”. They were atmospheric Victorian suspense (with some romance thrown in, of course). I recommend them to one and all. They were beautifully written and deeply satisfying. Whatever you choose, happy reading to you!

    Reply
  20. I just finished a fabulous set of two books by Michael Cox, called “The Meaning of Night” and “The Glass of Time”. They were atmospheric Victorian suspense (with some romance thrown in, of course). I recommend them to one and all. They were beautifully written and deeply satisfying. Whatever you choose, happy reading to you!

    Reply
  21. Currently reading something really different for me – I usually stick pretty close to romance or mystery – or a combination of both. About a month ago I read ‘The Killing of Crazy Horse’ by Thomas Powers – the first history I’ve read in many years. Now I’m reading ‘Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America’ by James Webb. Find that I have to fit in a lighter book every few chapters, but still – I’m enjoying the change.

    Reply
  22. Currently reading something really different for me – I usually stick pretty close to romance or mystery – or a combination of both. About a month ago I read ‘The Killing of Crazy Horse’ by Thomas Powers – the first history I’ve read in many years. Now I’m reading ‘Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America’ by James Webb. Find that I have to fit in a lighter book every few chapters, but still – I’m enjoying the change.

    Reply
  23. Currently reading something really different for me – I usually stick pretty close to romance or mystery – or a combination of both. About a month ago I read ‘The Killing of Crazy Horse’ by Thomas Powers – the first history I’ve read in many years. Now I’m reading ‘Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America’ by James Webb. Find that I have to fit in a lighter book every few chapters, but still – I’m enjoying the change.

    Reply
  24. Currently reading something really different for me – I usually stick pretty close to romance or mystery – or a combination of both. About a month ago I read ‘The Killing of Crazy Horse’ by Thomas Powers – the first history I’ve read in many years. Now I’m reading ‘Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America’ by James Webb. Find that I have to fit in a lighter book every few chapters, but still – I’m enjoying the change.

    Reply
  25. Currently reading something really different for me – I usually stick pretty close to romance or mystery – or a combination of both. About a month ago I read ‘The Killing of Crazy Horse’ by Thomas Powers – the first history I’ve read in many years. Now I’m reading ‘Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America’ by James Webb. Find that I have to fit in a lighter book every few chapters, but still – I’m enjoying the change.

    Reply
  26. Someone recommended Victoria Thompson’s Gaslight mysteries to me in June, and I tore through the first 12 in two weeks. They take place during turn-of-the-century New York and feature the mystery-solving team of Detective Sergeant Frank Malloy and Sarah Brandt, an upper-class-woman-cum-midwife. In addition to being good mysteries, the books deal with issues such as race and class in interesting ways. And there’s a wonderful, though frustratingly slow-to-develop romance.
    J Prince, I thought The Killing of Crazy Horse was terrific!

    Reply
  27. Someone recommended Victoria Thompson’s Gaslight mysteries to me in June, and I tore through the first 12 in two weeks. They take place during turn-of-the-century New York and feature the mystery-solving team of Detective Sergeant Frank Malloy and Sarah Brandt, an upper-class-woman-cum-midwife. In addition to being good mysteries, the books deal with issues such as race and class in interesting ways. And there’s a wonderful, though frustratingly slow-to-develop romance.
    J Prince, I thought The Killing of Crazy Horse was terrific!

    Reply
  28. Someone recommended Victoria Thompson’s Gaslight mysteries to me in June, and I tore through the first 12 in two weeks. They take place during turn-of-the-century New York and feature the mystery-solving team of Detective Sergeant Frank Malloy and Sarah Brandt, an upper-class-woman-cum-midwife. In addition to being good mysteries, the books deal with issues such as race and class in interesting ways. And there’s a wonderful, though frustratingly slow-to-develop romance.
    J Prince, I thought The Killing of Crazy Horse was terrific!

    Reply
  29. Someone recommended Victoria Thompson’s Gaslight mysteries to me in June, and I tore through the first 12 in two weeks. They take place during turn-of-the-century New York and feature the mystery-solving team of Detective Sergeant Frank Malloy and Sarah Brandt, an upper-class-woman-cum-midwife. In addition to being good mysteries, the books deal with issues such as race and class in interesting ways. And there’s a wonderful, though frustratingly slow-to-develop romance.
    J Prince, I thought The Killing of Crazy Horse was terrific!

    Reply
  30. Someone recommended Victoria Thompson’s Gaslight mysteries to me in June, and I tore through the first 12 in two weeks. They take place during turn-of-the-century New York and feature the mystery-solving team of Detective Sergeant Frank Malloy and Sarah Brandt, an upper-class-woman-cum-midwife. In addition to being good mysteries, the books deal with issues such as race and class in interesting ways. And there’s a wonderful, though frustratingly slow-to-develop romance.
    J Prince, I thought The Killing of Crazy Horse was terrific!

    Reply
  31. I have a Nook Color and have been slowly re-reading Rose in Winter because it’s just a wonderful retelling of an old premise. Mostly what I use the NC for is everything else. Since I rooted it, it’s just like any other tablet and I love it that way.
    I turn to Anne’s Perfect series, Moning’s Highlanders and Morgan’s Paladins for comfort reading. Right now, I seem to be reading in the past, old favorites. I haven’t picked up a new book in a long time now, though I have a shelf full of them.

    Reply
  32. I have a Nook Color and have been slowly re-reading Rose in Winter because it’s just a wonderful retelling of an old premise. Mostly what I use the NC for is everything else. Since I rooted it, it’s just like any other tablet and I love it that way.
    I turn to Anne’s Perfect series, Moning’s Highlanders and Morgan’s Paladins for comfort reading. Right now, I seem to be reading in the past, old favorites. I haven’t picked up a new book in a long time now, though I have a shelf full of them.

    Reply
  33. I have a Nook Color and have been slowly re-reading Rose in Winter because it’s just a wonderful retelling of an old premise. Mostly what I use the NC for is everything else. Since I rooted it, it’s just like any other tablet and I love it that way.
    I turn to Anne’s Perfect series, Moning’s Highlanders and Morgan’s Paladins for comfort reading. Right now, I seem to be reading in the past, old favorites. I haven’t picked up a new book in a long time now, though I have a shelf full of them.

    Reply
  34. I have a Nook Color and have been slowly re-reading Rose in Winter because it’s just a wonderful retelling of an old premise. Mostly what I use the NC for is everything else. Since I rooted it, it’s just like any other tablet and I love it that way.
    I turn to Anne’s Perfect series, Moning’s Highlanders and Morgan’s Paladins for comfort reading. Right now, I seem to be reading in the past, old favorites. I haven’t picked up a new book in a long time now, though I have a shelf full of them.

    Reply
  35. I have a Nook Color and have been slowly re-reading Rose in Winter because it’s just a wonderful retelling of an old premise. Mostly what I use the NC for is everything else. Since I rooted it, it’s just like any other tablet and I love it that way.
    I turn to Anne’s Perfect series, Moning’s Highlanders and Morgan’s Paladins for comfort reading. Right now, I seem to be reading in the past, old favorites. I haven’t picked up a new book in a long time now, though I have a shelf full of them.

    Reply
  36. I just finished two regency historicals, Traitor’s Kiss and Lover’s Kiss, by Mary Blayney, and am about to start the next one in that series. They had been languishing in my TBR pile for some time.
    I have also been reading cheapos & freebies on my kindle – latest, two short mysteries by JR Rain, an older Elizabeth Rolls and Ruppelt’s Report on Unidentified Flying Objects in between. I love my kindle, I just hate the prices (good thing, because I’m an awful impulse buyer).
    I was in B&N tonight and picked up Lord and Lady Spy by Shana Galen and A Lily Among the Thorns by Rose Lerner (I liked her In for a Penny very much) and will probably read those this week.

    Reply
  37. I just finished two regency historicals, Traitor’s Kiss and Lover’s Kiss, by Mary Blayney, and am about to start the next one in that series. They had been languishing in my TBR pile for some time.
    I have also been reading cheapos & freebies on my kindle – latest, two short mysteries by JR Rain, an older Elizabeth Rolls and Ruppelt’s Report on Unidentified Flying Objects in between. I love my kindle, I just hate the prices (good thing, because I’m an awful impulse buyer).
    I was in B&N tonight and picked up Lord and Lady Spy by Shana Galen and A Lily Among the Thorns by Rose Lerner (I liked her In for a Penny very much) and will probably read those this week.

    Reply
  38. I just finished two regency historicals, Traitor’s Kiss and Lover’s Kiss, by Mary Blayney, and am about to start the next one in that series. They had been languishing in my TBR pile for some time.
    I have also been reading cheapos & freebies on my kindle – latest, two short mysteries by JR Rain, an older Elizabeth Rolls and Ruppelt’s Report on Unidentified Flying Objects in between. I love my kindle, I just hate the prices (good thing, because I’m an awful impulse buyer).
    I was in B&N tonight and picked up Lord and Lady Spy by Shana Galen and A Lily Among the Thorns by Rose Lerner (I liked her In for a Penny very much) and will probably read those this week.

    Reply
  39. I just finished two regency historicals, Traitor’s Kiss and Lover’s Kiss, by Mary Blayney, and am about to start the next one in that series. They had been languishing in my TBR pile for some time.
    I have also been reading cheapos & freebies on my kindle – latest, two short mysteries by JR Rain, an older Elizabeth Rolls and Ruppelt’s Report on Unidentified Flying Objects in between. I love my kindle, I just hate the prices (good thing, because I’m an awful impulse buyer).
    I was in B&N tonight and picked up Lord and Lady Spy by Shana Galen and A Lily Among the Thorns by Rose Lerner (I liked her In for a Penny very much) and will probably read those this week.

    Reply
  40. I just finished two regency historicals, Traitor’s Kiss and Lover’s Kiss, by Mary Blayney, and am about to start the next one in that series. They had been languishing in my TBR pile for some time.
    I have also been reading cheapos & freebies on my kindle – latest, two short mysteries by JR Rain, an older Elizabeth Rolls and Ruppelt’s Report on Unidentified Flying Objects in between. I love my kindle, I just hate the prices (good thing, because I’m an awful impulse buyer).
    I was in B&N tonight and picked up Lord and Lady Spy by Shana Galen and A Lily Among the Thorns by Rose Lerner (I liked her In for a Penny very much) and will probably read those this week.

    Reply
  41. I’ve been bingeing on Tasha Alexander and CS Harris, plus of course the most recent Balogh, Robb, Roberts, Krentz, and Stuart. Yes, Reading Holiday for me, too!

    Reply
  42. I’ve been bingeing on Tasha Alexander and CS Harris, plus of course the most recent Balogh, Robb, Roberts, Krentz, and Stuart. Yes, Reading Holiday for me, too!

    Reply
  43. I’ve been bingeing on Tasha Alexander and CS Harris, plus of course the most recent Balogh, Robb, Roberts, Krentz, and Stuart. Yes, Reading Holiday for me, too!

    Reply
  44. I’ve been bingeing on Tasha Alexander and CS Harris, plus of course the most recent Balogh, Robb, Roberts, Krentz, and Stuart. Yes, Reading Holiday for me, too!

    Reply
  45. I’ve been bingeing on Tasha Alexander and CS Harris, plus of course the most recent Balogh, Robb, Roberts, Krentz, and Stuart. Yes, Reading Holiday for me, too!

    Reply
  46. I’m a big fan of historical mysteries, and I have Cara/Andrea to thank for her recommendation of Imogen Robertson’s Georgian-set series. The characters are quite marvelous, but the books are at times quite dark. In that they are similar to C.S. Harris’ Sebastian St Cyr stories, but I love them both.
    If you are looking for a non-romance page-turner, I recommend Abraham Verghese’s “Cutting for Stone”. It’s a wonderful, captivating book until the very end and is an example of why I laugh when people say romances have contrived endings. Until those last few pages, however, it’s vivid and exciting, with marvelous 3-dimensional characters, and located in an exotic (to me at least) setting.

    Reply
  47. I’m a big fan of historical mysteries, and I have Cara/Andrea to thank for her recommendation of Imogen Robertson’s Georgian-set series. The characters are quite marvelous, but the books are at times quite dark. In that they are similar to C.S. Harris’ Sebastian St Cyr stories, but I love them both.
    If you are looking for a non-romance page-turner, I recommend Abraham Verghese’s “Cutting for Stone”. It’s a wonderful, captivating book until the very end and is an example of why I laugh when people say romances have contrived endings. Until those last few pages, however, it’s vivid and exciting, with marvelous 3-dimensional characters, and located in an exotic (to me at least) setting.

    Reply
  48. I’m a big fan of historical mysteries, and I have Cara/Andrea to thank for her recommendation of Imogen Robertson’s Georgian-set series. The characters are quite marvelous, but the books are at times quite dark. In that they are similar to C.S. Harris’ Sebastian St Cyr stories, but I love them both.
    If you are looking for a non-romance page-turner, I recommend Abraham Verghese’s “Cutting for Stone”. It’s a wonderful, captivating book until the very end and is an example of why I laugh when people say romances have contrived endings. Until those last few pages, however, it’s vivid and exciting, with marvelous 3-dimensional characters, and located in an exotic (to me at least) setting.

    Reply
  49. I’m a big fan of historical mysteries, and I have Cara/Andrea to thank for her recommendation of Imogen Robertson’s Georgian-set series. The characters are quite marvelous, but the books are at times quite dark. In that they are similar to C.S. Harris’ Sebastian St Cyr stories, but I love them both.
    If you are looking for a non-romance page-turner, I recommend Abraham Verghese’s “Cutting for Stone”. It’s a wonderful, captivating book until the very end and is an example of why I laugh when people say romances have contrived endings. Until those last few pages, however, it’s vivid and exciting, with marvelous 3-dimensional characters, and located in an exotic (to me at least) setting.

    Reply
  50. I’m a big fan of historical mysteries, and I have Cara/Andrea to thank for her recommendation of Imogen Robertson’s Georgian-set series. The characters are quite marvelous, but the books are at times quite dark. In that they are similar to C.S. Harris’ Sebastian St Cyr stories, but I love them both.
    If you are looking for a non-romance page-turner, I recommend Abraham Verghese’s “Cutting for Stone”. It’s a wonderful, captivating book until the very end and is an example of why I laugh when people say romances have contrived endings. Until those last few pages, however, it’s vivid and exciting, with marvelous 3-dimensional characters, and located in an exotic (to me at least) setting.

    Reply
  51. I read the Word Wenche’s Romances (and other romances) and I recommended this site to a friend this weekend. She and I also read Science Fiction and Fantasy and it was at an SF Convention that I made the recommendation.
    At that convention I bought a book called “The Floating Islands” by Rachel Neumeier. I suspect it’s marketed as YA. I don’t believe that you need to understand the tropes from Science Fiction and Fantasy to enjoy it. I LIKE these young people. They are the type you would like to know and to watch grow up (and no, I’m not hinting for a sequel; merely commenting on the characterization).

    Reply
  52. I read the Word Wenche’s Romances (and other romances) and I recommended this site to a friend this weekend. She and I also read Science Fiction and Fantasy and it was at an SF Convention that I made the recommendation.
    At that convention I bought a book called “The Floating Islands” by Rachel Neumeier. I suspect it’s marketed as YA. I don’t believe that you need to understand the tropes from Science Fiction and Fantasy to enjoy it. I LIKE these young people. They are the type you would like to know and to watch grow up (and no, I’m not hinting for a sequel; merely commenting on the characterization).

    Reply
  53. I read the Word Wenche’s Romances (and other romances) and I recommended this site to a friend this weekend. She and I also read Science Fiction and Fantasy and it was at an SF Convention that I made the recommendation.
    At that convention I bought a book called “The Floating Islands” by Rachel Neumeier. I suspect it’s marketed as YA. I don’t believe that you need to understand the tropes from Science Fiction and Fantasy to enjoy it. I LIKE these young people. They are the type you would like to know and to watch grow up (and no, I’m not hinting for a sequel; merely commenting on the characterization).

    Reply
  54. I read the Word Wenche’s Romances (and other romances) and I recommended this site to a friend this weekend. She and I also read Science Fiction and Fantasy and it was at an SF Convention that I made the recommendation.
    At that convention I bought a book called “The Floating Islands” by Rachel Neumeier. I suspect it’s marketed as YA. I don’t believe that you need to understand the tropes from Science Fiction and Fantasy to enjoy it. I LIKE these young people. They are the type you would like to know and to watch grow up (and no, I’m not hinting for a sequel; merely commenting on the characterization).

    Reply
  55. I read the Word Wenche’s Romances (and other romances) and I recommended this site to a friend this weekend. She and I also read Science Fiction and Fantasy and it was at an SF Convention that I made the recommendation.
    At that convention I bought a book called “The Floating Islands” by Rachel Neumeier. I suspect it’s marketed as YA. I don’t believe that you need to understand the tropes from Science Fiction and Fantasy to enjoy it. I LIKE these young people. They are the type you would like to know and to watch grow up (and no, I’m not hinting for a sequel; merely commenting on the characterization).

    Reply
  56. P.S. Forgot to mention in my shout-out to historical mysteries the Frank Tallis books set in turn of the last century Vienna. There is a developing love interest, but these are by no means romances. Be prepared to get hungry every time the two main characters stop for coffee and pastries, which they seem to do quite often.
    And I’m looking forward to the next Andrea Penrose (only a few months to wait) and the most recent Nicola Cornick and Patricia Rice books, which are calling to me from my TBR pile.

    Reply
  57. P.S. Forgot to mention in my shout-out to historical mysteries the Frank Tallis books set in turn of the last century Vienna. There is a developing love interest, but these are by no means romances. Be prepared to get hungry every time the two main characters stop for coffee and pastries, which they seem to do quite often.
    And I’m looking forward to the next Andrea Penrose (only a few months to wait) and the most recent Nicola Cornick and Patricia Rice books, which are calling to me from my TBR pile.

    Reply
  58. P.S. Forgot to mention in my shout-out to historical mysteries the Frank Tallis books set in turn of the last century Vienna. There is a developing love interest, but these are by no means romances. Be prepared to get hungry every time the two main characters stop for coffee and pastries, which they seem to do quite often.
    And I’m looking forward to the next Andrea Penrose (only a few months to wait) and the most recent Nicola Cornick and Patricia Rice books, which are calling to me from my TBR pile.

    Reply
  59. P.S. Forgot to mention in my shout-out to historical mysteries the Frank Tallis books set in turn of the last century Vienna. There is a developing love interest, but these are by no means romances. Be prepared to get hungry every time the two main characters stop for coffee and pastries, which they seem to do quite often.
    And I’m looking forward to the next Andrea Penrose (only a few months to wait) and the most recent Nicola Cornick and Patricia Rice books, which are calling to me from my TBR pile.

    Reply
  60. P.S. Forgot to mention in my shout-out to historical mysteries the Frank Tallis books set in turn of the last century Vienna. There is a developing love interest, but these are by no means romances. Be prepared to get hungry every time the two main characters stop for coffee and pastries, which they seem to do quite often.
    And I’m looking forward to the next Andrea Penrose (only a few months to wait) and the most recent Nicola Cornick and Patricia Rice books, which are calling to me from my TBR pile.

    Reply
  61. This book reads like an encyclopedia–maybe not quite that dry–but I think it’s fascinating: A Pattern Language by Christopher Alexander et al. It’s an architecture book that’s looked at spaces around the world to catalog what makes them the most welcoming, useful, and vibrant. Reading it makes me think a little about the healing St. Bride home in Jo Beverley’s To Rescue a Rogue, about actual places I’ve visited, and about improvements for my own space.

    Reply
  62. This book reads like an encyclopedia–maybe not quite that dry–but I think it’s fascinating: A Pattern Language by Christopher Alexander et al. It’s an architecture book that’s looked at spaces around the world to catalog what makes them the most welcoming, useful, and vibrant. Reading it makes me think a little about the healing St. Bride home in Jo Beverley’s To Rescue a Rogue, about actual places I’ve visited, and about improvements for my own space.

    Reply
  63. This book reads like an encyclopedia–maybe not quite that dry–but I think it’s fascinating: A Pattern Language by Christopher Alexander et al. It’s an architecture book that’s looked at spaces around the world to catalog what makes them the most welcoming, useful, and vibrant. Reading it makes me think a little about the healing St. Bride home in Jo Beverley’s To Rescue a Rogue, about actual places I’ve visited, and about improvements for my own space.

    Reply
  64. This book reads like an encyclopedia–maybe not quite that dry–but I think it’s fascinating: A Pattern Language by Christopher Alexander et al. It’s an architecture book that’s looked at spaces around the world to catalog what makes them the most welcoming, useful, and vibrant. Reading it makes me think a little about the healing St. Bride home in Jo Beverley’s To Rescue a Rogue, about actual places I’ve visited, and about improvements for my own space.

    Reply
  65. This book reads like an encyclopedia–maybe not quite that dry–but I think it’s fascinating: A Pattern Language by Christopher Alexander et al. It’s an architecture book that’s looked at spaces around the world to catalog what makes them the most welcoming, useful, and vibrant. Reading it makes me think a little about the healing St. Bride home in Jo Beverley’s To Rescue a Rogue, about actual places I’ve visited, and about improvements for my own space.

    Reply
  66. I have a few knock-my-socks off books I’ve read:
    THE ROSE GARDEN by Susanna Kearsley–a time travel i loved and I’m not a big fan of time travels.
    MIDNIGHT ON JULIA STREET by Ciji Ware – a time slip in contemporary New Orleans back to the ante bellum city. Again, I don’t care for time slips, but this was great.
    A RACE TO SPLENDOR by Ciji Ware – historical set in San Francisco during the 1906 earthquake about a woman architect. Great history, and a woman fighting a man’s world and winning. A great story
    As for fantasy, there’s THE STRANGELY BEAUTIFUL WORLD OF MISS PERCY PARKER by Leanna Renee Hieber. It’s marketed as YA, and I don’t care for YA, but I like this one. An historical fantasy set in Victorian London, and something completely different in the world of fantasy.

    Reply
  67. I have a few knock-my-socks off books I’ve read:
    THE ROSE GARDEN by Susanna Kearsley–a time travel i loved and I’m not a big fan of time travels.
    MIDNIGHT ON JULIA STREET by Ciji Ware – a time slip in contemporary New Orleans back to the ante bellum city. Again, I don’t care for time slips, but this was great.
    A RACE TO SPLENDOR by Ciji Ware – historical set in San Francisco during the 1906 earthquake about a woman architect. Great history, and a woman fighting a man’s world and winning. A great story
    As for fantasy, there’s THE STRANGELY BEAUTIFUL WORLD OF MISS PERCY PARKER by Leanna Renee Hieber. It’s marketed as YA, and I don’t care for YA, but I like this one. An historical fantasy set in Victorian London, and something completely different in the world of fantasy.

    Reply
  68. I have a few knock-my-socks off books I’ve read:
    THE ROSE GARDEN by Susanna Kearsley–a time travel i loved and I’m not a big fan of time travels.
    MIDNIGHT ON JULIA STREET by Ciji Ware – a time slip in contemporary New Orleans back to the ante bellum city. Again, I don’t care for time slips, but this was great.
    A RACE TO SPLENDOR by Ciji Ware – historical set in San Francisco during the 1906 earthquake about a woman architect. Great history, and a woman fighting a man’s world and winning. A great story
    As for fantasy, there’s THE STRANGELY BEAUTIFUL WORLD OF MISS PERCY PARKER by Leanna Renee Hieber. It’s marketed as YA, and I don’t care for YA, but I like this one. An historical fantasy set in Victorian London, and something completely different in the world of fantasy.

    Reply
  69. I have a few knock-my-socks off books I’ve read:
    THE ROSE GARDEN by Susanna Kearsley–a time travel i loved and I’m not a big fan of time travels.
    MIDNIGHT ON JULIA STREET by Ciji Ware – a time slip in contemporary New Orleans back to the ante bellum city. Again, I don’t care for time slips, but this was great.
    A RACE TO SPLENDOR by Ciji Ware – historical set in San Francisco during the 1906 earthquake about a woman architect. Great history, and a woman fighting a man’s world and winning. A great story
    As for fantasy, there’s THE STRANGELY BEAUTIFUL WORLD OF MISS PERCY PARKER by Leanna Renee Hieber. It’s marketed as YA, and I don’t care for YA, but I like this one. An historical fantasy set in Victorian London, and something completely different in the world of fantasy.

    Reply
  70. I have a few knock-my-socks off books I’ve read:
    THE ROSE GARDEN by Susanna Kearsley–a time travel i loved and I’m not a big fan of time travels.
    MIDNIGHT ON JULIA STREET by Ciji Ware – a time slip in contemporary New Orleans back to the ante bellum city. Again, I don’t care for time slips, but this was great.
    A RACE TO SPLENDOR by Ciji Ware – historical set in San Francisco during the 1906 earthquake about a woman architect. Great history, and a woman fighting a man’s world and winning. A great story
    As for fantasy, there’s THE STRANGELY BEAUTIFUL WORLD OF MISS PERCY PARKER by Leanna Renee Hieber. It’s marketed as YA, and I don’t care for YA, but I like this one. An historical fantasy set in Victorian London, and something completely different in the world of fantasy.

    Reply
  71. I recently finished a couple series I enjoyed very much:
    Nora Roberts Bride Quartet
    Rhys Bowens Her Royal Spyness series. I started with the latest one Naughty in Nice & then went back to read the first four. I would suggest reading them in order. Takes place in early 1930’s England/Scotland/Europe – murder mystery with humor.

    Reply
  72. I recently finished a couple series I enjoyed very much:
    Nora Roberts Bride Quartet
    Rhys Bowens Her Royal Spyness series. I started with the latest one Naughty in Nice & then went back to read the first four. I would suggest reading them in order. Takes place in early 1930’s England/Scotland/Europe – murder mystery with humor.

    Reply
  73. I recently finished a couple series I enjoyed very much:
    Nora Roberts Bride Quartet
    Rhys Bowens Her Royal Spyness series. I started with the latest one Naughty in Nice & then went back to read the first four. I would suggest reading them in order. Takes place in early 1930’s England/Scotland/Europe – murder mystery with humor.

    Reply
  74. I recently finished a couple series I enjoyed very much:
    Nora Roberts Bride Quartet
    Rhys Bowens Her Royal Spyness series. I started with the latest one Naughty in Nice & then went back to read the first four. I would suggest reading them in order. Takes place in early 1930’s England/Scotland/Europe – murder mystery with humor.

    Reply
  75. I recently finished a couple series I enjoyed very much:
    Nora Roberts Bride Quartet
    Rhys Bowens Her Royal Spyness series. I started with the latest one Naughty in Nice & then went back to read the first four. I would suggest reading them in order. Takes place in early 1930’s England/Scotland/Europe – murder mystery with humor.

    Reply
  76. New books I have read and loved: Ashlyn Chase’s trilogy-Strange Neighbors, The Werewolf Upstairs(my fav of the series), and The Vampire Next Door. Sarah Jio’s The Violets of March.
    I am now starting Mary Balogh’s Slightly Wicked and will finish the rest of the series. Picked these up from the library. I love the library.
    Old favorites that I have read lately, just finished Sabrina Jeffries Hellions series because new book coming out soon.

    Reply
  77. New books I have read and loved: Ashlyn Chase’s trilogy-Strange Neighbors, The Werewolf Upstairs(my fav of the series), and The Vampire Next Door. Sarah Jio’s The Violets of March.
    I am now starting Mary Balogh’s Slightly Wicked and will finish the rest of the series. Picked these up from the library. I love the library.
    Old favorites that I have read lately, just finished Sabrina Jeffries Hellions series because new book coming out soon.

    Reply
  78. New books I have read and loved: Ashlyn Chase’s trilogy-Strange Neighbors, The Werewolf Upstairs(my fav of the series), and The Vampire Next Door. Sarah Jio’s The Violets of March.
    I am now starting Mary Balogh’s Slightly Wicked and will finish the rest of the series. Picked these up from the library. I love the library.
    Old favorites that I have read lately, just finished Sabrina Jeffries Hellions series because new book coming out soon.

    Reply
  79. New books I have read and loved: Ashlyn Chase’s trilogy-Strange Neighbors, The Werewolf Upstairs(my fav of the series), and The Vampire Next Door. Sarah Jio’s The Violets of March.
    I am now starting Mary Balogh’s Slightly Wicked and will finish the rest of the series. Picked these up from the library. I love the library.
    Old favorites that I have read lately, just finished Sabrina Jeffries Hellions series because new book coming out soon.

    Reply
  80. New books I have read and loved: Ashlyn Chase’s trilogy-Strange Neighbors, The Werewolf Upstairs(my fav of the series), and The Vampire Next Door. Sarah Jio’s The Violets of March.
    I am now starting Mary Balogh’s Slightly Wicked and will finish the rest of the series. Picked these up from the library. I love the library.
    Old favorites that I have read lately, just finished Sabrina Jeffries Hellions series because new book coming out soon.

    Reply
  81. I always recommend The Heaven Tree trilogy by Edith Pargeter – it’s amazing!
    I’m currently reading True Grit. I didn’t even know it was a book! But my husband read it and said I had to as well. It’s not my usual fare, but it is so worthwhile – a forgotten classic.
    I’m also reading Daughter of York by Anne Easter Smith. It’s the story or Margaret, sister of Edward, George and Richard, the famous sons of York. Truly fascinating.
    Happy reading!

    Reply
  82. I always recommend The Heaven Tree trilogy by Edith Pargeter – it’s amazing!
    I’m currently reading True Grit. I didn’t even know it was a book! But my husband read it and said I had to as well. It’s not my usual fare, but it is so worthwhile – a forgotten classic.
    I’m also reading Daughter of York by Anne Easter Smith. It’s the story or Margaret, sister of Edward, George and Richard, the famous sons of York. Truly fascinating.
    Happy reading!

    Reply
  83. I always recommend The Heaven Tree trilogy by Edith Pargeter – it’s amazing!
    I’m currently reading True Grit. I didn’t even know it was a book! But my husband read it and said I had to as well. It’s not my usual fare, but it is so worthwhile – a forgotten classic.
    I’m also reading Daughter of York by Anne Easter Smith. It’s the story or Margaret, sister of Edward, George and Richard, the famous sons of York. Truly fascinating.
    Happy reading!

    Reply
  84. I always recommend The Heaven Tree trilogy by Edith Pargeter – it’s amazing!
    I’m currently reading True Grit. I didn’t even know it was a book! But my husband read it and said I had to as well. It’s not my usual fare, but it is so worthwhile – a forgotten classic.
    I’m also reading Daughter of York by Anne Easter Smith. It’s the story or Margaret, sister of Edward, George and Richard, the famous sons of York. Truly fascinating.
    Happy reading!

    Reply
  85. I always recommend The Heaven Tree trilogy by Edith Pargeter – it’s amazing!
    I’m currently reading True Grit. I didn’t even know it was a book! But my husband read it and said I had to as well. It’s not my usual fare, but it is so worthwhile – a forgotten classic.
    I’m also reading Daughter of York by Anne Easter Smith. It’s the story or Margaret, sister of Edward, George and Richard, the famous sons of York. Truly fascinating.
    Happy reading!

    Reply
  86. Annie – I also love the Victoria Thompson series. However, I’m trying to make it last – I started it last year and am only through the first 9.
    I also love lots of the others that have been mentioned here – historical mystery/romances – Tasha Alexander, CS Harris, Sherry Thompson. And J D Robb.

    Reply
  87. Annie – I also love the Victoria Thompson series. However, I’m trying to make it last – I started it last year and am only through the first 9.
    I also love lots of the others that have been mentioned here – historical mystery/romances – Tasha Alexander, CS Harris, Sherry Thompson. And J D Robb.

    Reply
  88. Annie – I also love the Victoria Thompson series. However, I’m trying to make it last – I started it last year and am only through the first 9.
    I also love lots of the others that have been mentioned here – historical mystery/romances – Tasha Alexander, CS Harris, Sherry Thompson. And J D Robb.

    Reply
  89. Annie – I also love the Victoria Thompson series. However, I’m trying to make it last – I started it last year and am only through the first 9.
    I also love lots of the others that have been mentioned here – historical mystery/romances – Tasha Alexander, CS Harris, Sherry Thompson. And J D Robb.

    Reply
  90. Annie – I also love the Victoria Thompson series. However, I’m trying to make it last – I started it last year and am only through the first 9.
    I also love lots of the others that have been mentioned here – historical mystery/romances – Tasha Alexander, CS Harris, Sherry Thompson. And J D Robb.

    Reply
  91. Roaming my small town library I found Mistress of the Art of Death by Ariana Franklin (Diana Norman), unfortunately passed to the Great Library in the Sky early this year. I hope to find her other books soon. They take up where Brother Cadfael left off. I loved the late Judith Merkle Riley’s books. But I am slowly going through all my books weeding them, a painful process.

    Reply
  92. Roaming my small town library I found Mistress of the Art of Death by Ariana Franklin (Diana Norman), unfortunately passed to the Great Library in the Sky early this year. I hope to find her other books soon. They take up where Brother Cadfael left off. I loved the late Judith Merkle Riley’s books. But I am slowly going through all my books weeding them, a painful process.

    Reply
  93. Roaming my small town library I found Mistress of the Art of Death by Ariana Franklin (Diana Norman), unfortunately passed to the Great Library in the Sky early this year. I hope to find her other books soon. They take up where Brother Cadfael left off. I loved the late Judith Merkle Riley’s books. But I am slowly going through all my books weeding them, a painful process.

    Reply
  94. Roaming my small town library I found Mistress of the Art of Death by Ariana Franklin (Diana Norman), unfortunately passed to the Great Library in the Sky early this year. I hope to find her other books soon. They take up where Brother Cadfael left off. I loved the late Judith Merkle Riley’s books. But I am slowly going through all my books weeding them, a painful process.

    Reply
  95. Roaming my small town library I found Mistress of the Art of Death by Ariana Franklin (Diana Norman), unfortunately passed to the Great Library in the Sky early this year. I hope to find her other books soon. They take up where Brother Cadfael left off. I loved the late Judith Merkle Riley’s books. But I am slowly going through all my books weeding them, a painful process.

    Reply

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