A Reading Holiday

Waterhouse3 Susan Sarah here — a bit on the weary and bleary side, having just finished another manuscript and sent it in, with the last section written at top speed, day and night, which is unfortunately the best writing mode for me. I could attempt a more civilized pace, but eventually, every book, I have to kick the writing engines into overdrive. I’m hardwired to be a Hare, and make that wild and crazy dash for the finish line, after way too long ruminatin’ under a tree… This time I really tried to be a Tortoise, organized and in control ‘n stuff like that, but I plodded along in a clunky way, not very inspired. Once I let my Inner Rabbit free, that story popped and came together quite nicely. And very fast … so I’m tired and ready for some rest.

Before I pick up where I left off on the other current work-in-progress (set aside so the bunny could make her mad dash to a tight deadline) … I’m taking a reading holiday!

Booksinwinter_jessewilcoxsmith I have a real craving, a need-to-read, and I’m putting all else on hold — housework (lots of that, I’ve just finished a book, gimme a break, have I done much clutter control? <scoff>), shopping, email, TV (OK maybe not Dancing With The Stars or American Idol, on which I’m *shamelessly* hooked)… Instead, I’m scanning the bookshelves upstairs and down and poring through my stacks of To-Be-Reads looking for just the right read. And if the books here in the house don’t appeal at the moment, the craving will drive me out to the bookstores and libraries (even on cold and rainy nights, like tonight) to keep looking for that elusive, satisfying read ….

Stack_of_books So there it is. I’m all set to plunge into a substantial reading frenzy, and I need your help. There’s a zillion books in my house, and a pretty fair number of TBR’s, and yet — I’m not sure WHAT I want to read. I want something new. I want something unexpected. So I hope you’ll help me out, and tell me —

What are you reading now that you love, love, love; what thrills you, surprises you, puts you in awe of story, characters, writing?  Is there a book whose characters are still with you, camping out in your heart?

What are you reading that seems fresh and exciting to you? Maybe it’s a genre you haven’t tried before, or a new author, or a new twist in a familiar genre….

Or maybe it’s an oldie but a goodie — a favorite comfort read you always turn to when you’re ready to sink in to a relaxing read, a book that still thrills you.

What book have you read lately that sucked you in and didn’t let go until you finished it? And would you put that on your keeper shelf and recommend it to everyone who would listen?

I’m looking for recommendations!!  Book lists! Tell me the title and author of that wonderful book — I’m eager to learn about a new author or story from you all. And we’ll ALL get some GREAT suggestions.

Susan Sarah

165 thoughts on “A Reading Holiday”

  1. Whenever someone asks this question, my answer is always the same. “Outlander” by Diana Gabaldon. I think her Jamie Fraser may be the greatest fictional hero ever created. It’s a hard book to classify. I wouldn’t call it a romance, at least in not in the traditional sense, althought the love story between Jamie and Claire is definitely the focal point. It’s historical, it’s fantastical, it’s literary, it’s swashbucklingly adventurous. It’s the best 6oo+ pages I’ve ever read and re-read.

    Reply
  2. Whenever someone asks this question, my answer is always the same. “Outlander” by Diana Gabaldon. I think her Jamie Fraser may be the greatest fictional hero ever created. It’s a hard book to classify. I wouldn’t call it a romance, at least in not in the traditional sense, althought the love story between Jamie and Claire is definitely the focal point. It’s historical, it’s fantastical, it’s literary, it’s swashbucklingly adventurous. It’s the best 6oo+ pages I’ve ever read and re-read.

    Reply
  3. Whenever someone asks this question, my answer is always the same. “Outlander” by Diana Gabaldon. I think her Jamie Fraser may be the greatest fictional hero ever created. It’s a hard book to classify. I wouldn’t call it a romance, at least in not in the traditional sense, althought the love story between Jamie and Claire is definitely the focal point. It’s historical, it’s fantastical, it’s literary, it’s swashbucklingly adventurous. It’s the best 6oo+ pages I’ve ever read and re-read.

    Reply
  4. Whenever someone asks this question, my answer is always the same. “Outlander” by Diana Gabaldon. I think her Jamie Fraser may be the greatest fictional hero ever created. It’s a hard book to classify. I wouldn’t call it a romance, at least in not in the traditional sense, althought the love story between Jamie and Claire is definitely the focal point. It’s historical, it’s fantastical, it’s literary, it’s swashbucklingly adventurous. It’s the best 6oo+ pages I’ve ever read and re-read.

    Reply
  5. Whenever someone asks this question, my answer is always the same. “Outlander” by Diana Gabaldon. I think her Jamie Fraser may be the greatest fictional hero ever created. It’s a hard book to classify. I wouldn’t call it a romance, at least in not in the traditional sense, althought the love story between Jamie and Claire is definitely the focal point. It’s historical, it’s fantastical, it’s literary, it’s swashbucklingly adventurous. It’s the best 6oo+ pages I’ve ever read and re-read.

    Reply
  6. How funny! My cp blogged this same question. Must be reading time!
    Just finished Bobbie Faye’s Very (very, very, very) Bad Day by Toni McGee Causey. Fabulous! Very different from what I usually read, and I couldn’t have enjoyed it more. Her use of pace, description and dialogue is masterful.
    And I’m always reading something by Laurie R King. Just started Beekeeper’s Apprentice again, even though I know it so well I could quote it. Everything about Sherlock and Russell is gold.

    Reply
  7. How funny! My cp blogged this same question. Must be reading time!
    Just finished Bobbie Faye’s Very (very, very, very) Bad Day by Toni McGee Causey. Fabulous! Very different from what I usually read, and I couldn’t have enjoyed it more. Her use of pace, description and dialogue is masterful.
    And I’m always reading something by Laurie R King. Just started Beekeeper’s Apprentice again, even though I know it so well I could quote it. Everything about Sherlock and Russell is gold.

    Reply
  8. How funny! My cp blogged this same question. Must be reading time!
    Just finished Bobbie Faye’s Very (very, very, very) Bad Day by Toni McGee Causey. Fabulous! Very different from what I usually read, and I couldn’t have enjoyed it more. Her use of pace, description and dialogue is masterful.
    And I’m always reading something by Laurie R King. Just started Beekeeper’s Apprentice again, even though I know it so well I could quote it. Everything about Sherlock and Russell is gold.

    Reply
  9. How funny! My cp blogged this same question. Must be reading time!
    Just finished Bobbie Faye’s Very (very, very, very) Bad Day by Toni McGee Causey. Fabulous! Very different from what I usually read, and I couldn’t have enjoyed it more. Her use of pace, description and dialogue is masterful.
    And I’m always reading something by Laurie R King. Just started Beekeeper’s Apprentice again, even though I know it so well I could quote it. Everything about Sherlock and Russell is gold.

    Reply
  10. How funny! My cp blogged this same question. Must be reading time!
    Just finished Bobbie Faye’s Very (very, very, very) Bad Day by Toni McGee Causey. Fabulous! Very different from what I usually read, and I couldn’t have enjoyed it more. Her use of pace, description and dialogue is masterful.
    And I’m always reading something by Laurie R King. Just started Beekeeper’s Apprentice again, even though I know it so well I could quote it. Everything about Sherlock and Russell is gold.

    Reply
  11. I have just discovered (in spite of the fact that it had long ago been recommended to me by someone whose taste I trust) Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan series, and am totally in love with it. She is an absolutely wonderful writer in every way.
    I am also reading A Countess Below Stairs by Eva Ibbottson IN SPANISH!!!! which is going slowly, due to the fact that I’m in the midst of learning the language. But ACBS is a book that will keep me at it.
    If you like YA stuff and want to howl with laughter, try Louise Rennison’s work, starting with Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging.
    If you want a great, intelligent mystery with wonderful characters, get one of Reginald Hill’s Dalziel and Pascoe mysteries.
    How long a reading vacation are you planning? There’s Robin McKinley, Robin Hobb, Wen Spencer, Kage Baker, Peter Dickinson, Donna Leon, Andrea Camilleri; plus old favorites like Dorothy Sayers and Anthony Trollope. They all have bodies of work, which is a great boon when you find the writer for the first time because you can plunge in and just SATE yourself!
    I’m sure there are other yet-to-be-discovered delights out there, so I’m hoping that other readers’ suggestions will lead me to a few, and that my own list has something you’ll treasure. Have fun!

    Reply
  12. I have just discovered (in spite of the fact that it had long ago been recommended to me by someone whose taste I trust) Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan series, and am totally in love with it. She is an absolutely wonderful writer in every way.
    I am also reading A Countess Below Stairs by Eva Ibbottson IN SPANISH!!!! which is going slowly, due to the fact that I’m in the midst of learning the language. But ACBS is a book that will keep me at it.
    If you like YA stuff and want to howl with laughter, try Louise Rennison’s work, starting with Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging.
    If you want a great, intelligent mystery with wonderful characters, get one of Reginald Hill’s Dalziel and Pascoe mysteries.
    How long a reading vacation are you planning? There’s Robin McKinley, Robin Hobb, Wen Spencer, Kage Baker, Peter Dickinson, Donna Leon, Andrea Camilleri; plus old favorites like Dorothy Sayers and Anthony Trollope. They all have bodies of work, which is a great boon when you find the writer for the first time because you can plunge in and just SATE yourself!
    I’m sure there are other yet-to-be-discovered delights out there, so I’m hoping that other readers’ suggestions will lead me to a few, and that my own list has something you’ll treasure. Have fun!

    Reply
  13. I have just discovered (in spite of the fact that it had long ago been recommended to me by someone whose taste I trust) Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan series, and am totally in love with it. She is an absolutely wonderful writer in every way.
    I am also reading A Countess Below Stairs by Eva Ibbottson IN SPANISH!!!! which is going slowly, due to the fact that I’m in the midst of learning the language. But ACBS is a book that will keep me at it.
    If you like YA stuff and want to howl with laughter, try Louise Rennison’s work, starting with Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging.
    If you want a great, intelligent mystery with wonderful characters, get one of Reginald Hill’s Dalziel and Pascoe mysteries.
    How long a reading vacation are you planning? There’s Robin McKinley, Robin Hobb, Wen Spencer, Kage Baker, Peter Dickinson, Donna Leon, Andrea Camilleri; plus old favorites like Dorothy Sayers and Anthony Trollope. They all have bodies of work, which is a great boon when you find the writer for the first time because you can plunge in and just SATE yourself!
    I’m sure there are other yet-to-be-discovered delights out there, so I’m hoping that other readers’ suggestions will lead me to a few, and that my own list has something you’ll treasure. Have fun!

    Reply
  14. I have just discovered (in spite of the fact that it had long ago been recommended to me by someone whose taste I trust) Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan series, and am totally in love with it. She is an absolutely wonderful writer in every way.
    I am also reading A Countess Below Stairs by Eva Ibbottson IN SPANISH!!!! which is going slowly, due to the fact that I’m in the midst of learning the language. But ACBS is a book that will keep me at it.
    If you like YA stuff and want to howl with laughter, try Louise Rennison’s work, starting with Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging.
    If you want a great, intelligent mystery with wonderful characters, get one of Reginald Hill’s Dalziel and Pascoe mysteries.
    How long a reading vacation are you planning? There’s Robin McKinley, Robin Hobb, Wen Spencer, Kage Baker, Peter Dickinson, Donna Leon, Andrea Camilleri; plus old favorites like Dorothy Sayers and Anthony Trollope. They all have bodies of work, which is a great boon when you find the writer for the first time because you can plunge in and just SATE yourself!
    I’m sure there are other yet-to-be-discovered delights out there, so I’m hoping that other readers’ suggestions will lead me to a few, and that my own list has something you’ll treasure. Have fun!

    Reply
  15. I have just discovered (in spite of the fact that it had long ago been recommended to me by someone whose taste I trust) Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan series, and am totally in love with it. She is an absolutely wonderful writer in every way.
    I am also reading A Countess Below Stairs by Eva Ibbottson IN SPANISH!!!! which is going slowly, due to the fact that I’m in the midst of learning the language. But ACBS is a book that will keep me at it.
    If you like YA stuff and want to howl with laughter, try Louise Rennison’s work, starting with Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging.
    If you want a great, intelligent mystery with wonderful characters, get one of Reginald Hill’s Dalziel and Pascoe mysteries.
    How long a reading vacation are you planning? There’s Robin McKinley, Robin Hobb, Wen Spencer, Kage Baker, Peter Dickinson, Donna Leon, Andrea Camilleri; plus old favorites like Dorothy Sayers and Anthony Trollope. They all have bodies of work, which is a great boon when you find the writer for the first time because you can plunge in and just SATE yourself!
    I’m sure there are other yet-to-be-discovered delights out there, so I’m hoping that other readers’ suggestions will lead me to a few, and that my own list has something you’ll treasure. Have fun!

    Reply
  16. I’m willing to bet that I don’t need to tell you that Jo’s latest is wonderful? *grin* I just read it yesterday, and I was just entralled the whole time.
    I’d say the best book I read in 07 was a reprint, but new to me: Tracy Grant’s SECRET’S OF A LADY. It’s a keeper!!!

    Reply
  17. I’m willing to bet that I don’t need to tell you that Jo’s latest is wonderful? *grin* I just read it yesterday, and I was just entralled the whole time.
    I’d say the best book I read in 07 was a reprint, but new to me: Tracy Grant’s SECRET’S OF A LADY. It’s a keeper!!!

    Reply
  18. I’m willing to bet that I don’t need to tell you that Jo’s latest is wonderful? *grin* I just read it yesterday, and I was just entralled the whole time.
    I’d say the best book I read in 07 was a reprint, but new to me: Tracy Grant’s SECRET’S OF A LADY. It’s a keeper!!!

    Reply
  19. I’m willing to bet that I don’t need to tell you that Jo’s latest is wonderful? *grin* I just read it yesterday, and I was just entralled the whole time.
    I’d say the best book I read in 07 was a reprint, but new to me: Tracy Grant’s SECRET’S OF A LADY. It’s a keeper!!!

    Reply
  20. I’m willing to bet that I don’t need to tell you that Jo’s latest is wonderful? *grin* I just read it yesterday, and I was just entralled the whole time.
    I’d say the best book I read in 07 was a reprint, but new to me: Tracy Grant’s SECRET’S OF A LADY. It’s a keeper!!!

    Reply
  21. The last book to get me excited was The Spymaster’s Lady, by Joanna Bourne, I thought it was the best book I have read , in a while, the writing was beautiful, the style, the characters, the heroine, which is almost always overlooked was AWESOME, All of it GREAT… I alson enjoyed the Stolen Princess by Anna Gracie… it was funny..
    right now I’m reading A lady’s Secret,Jo Bev..
    My Favs.(oldies) L.O.S, The last Hellion by L. Chase. The Perfect Rose, MJP. Any Historical ( but the latest) by Julie Garwood esp. Honors’s Splendor

    Reply
  22. The last book to get me excited was The Spymaster’s Lady, by Joanna Bourne, I thought it was the best book I have read , in a while, the writing was beautiful, the style, the characters, the heroine, which is almost always overlooked was AWESOME, All of it GREAT… I alson enjoyed the Stolen Princess by Anna Gracie… it was funny..
    right now I’m reading A lady’s Secret,Jo Bev..
    My Favs.(oldies) L.O.S, The last Hellion by L. Chase. The Perfect Rose, MJP. Any Historical ( but the latest) by Julie Garwood esp. Honors’s Splendor

    Reply
  23. The last book to get me excited was The Spymaster’s Lady, by Joanna Bourne, I thought it was the best book I have read , in a while, the writing was beautiful, the style, the characters, the heroine, which is almost always overlooked was AWESOME, All of it GREAT… I alson enjoyed the Stolen Princess by Anna Gracie… it was funny..
    right now I’m reading A lady’s Secret,Jo Bev..
    My Favs.(oldies) L.O.S, The last Hellion by L. Chase. The Perfect Rose, MJP. Any Historical ( but the latest) by Julie Garwood esp. Honors’s Splendor

    Reply
  24. The last book to get me excited was The Spymaster’s Lady, by Joanna Bourne, I thought it was the best book I have read , in a while, the writing was beautiful, the style, the characters, the heroine, which is almost always overlooked was AWESOME, All of it GREAT… I alson enjoyed the Stolen Princess by Anna Gracie… it was funny..
    right now I’m reading A lady’s Secret,Jo Bev..
    My Favs.(oldies) L.O.S, The last Hellion by L. Chase. The Perfect Rose, MJP. Any Historical ( but the latest) by Julie Garwood esp. Honors’s Splendor

    Reply
  25. The last book to get me excited was The Spymaster’s Lady, by Joanna Bourne, I thought it was the best book I have read , in a while, the writing was beautiful, the style, the characters, the heroine, which is almost always overlooked was AWESOME, All of it GREAT… I alson enjoyed the Stolen Princess by Anna Gracie… it was funny..
    right now I’m reading A lady’s Secret,Jo Bev..
    My Favs.(oldies) L.O.S, The last Hellion by L. Chase. The Perfect Rose, MJP. Any Historical ( but the latest) by Julie Garwood esp. Honors’s Splendor

    Reply
  26. I’ve been reading nothing but fascinating non-fiction lately, from Nina Burleigh’s Mirage to Bill Bryson’s charming Shakespeare to Hermione Lee’s Edith Wharton (which was so incredibly well-researched, but none of the French was translated. I guess Ms. Lee thought the reader would be somewhat fluent in French, but I only took 2 years in high school in nineteen-mumbledy something.).All three books have given me much to ponder on, as an aspiring writer/risk-taker/amateur historian.

    Reply
  27. I’ve been reading nothing but fascinating non-fiction lately, from Nina Burleigh’s Mirage to Bill Bryson’s charming Shakespeare to Hermione Lee’s Edith Wharton (which was so incredibly well-researched, but none of the French was translated. I guess Ms. Lee thought the reader would be somewhat fluent in French, but I only took 2 years in high school in nineteen-mumbledy something.).All three books have given me much to ponder on, as an aspiring writer/risk-taker/amateur historian.

    Reply
  28. I’ve been reading nothing but fascinating non-fiction lately, from Nina Burleigh’s Mirage to Bill Bryson’s charming Shakespeare to Hermione Lee’s Edith Wharton (which was so incredibly well-researched, but none of the French was translated. I guess Ms. Lee thought the reader would be somewhat fluent in French, but I only took 2 years in high school in nineteen-mumbledy something.).All three books have given me much to ponder on, as an aspiring writer/risk-taker/amateur historian.

    Reply
  29. I’ve been reading nothing but fascinating non-fiction lately, from Nina Burleigh’s Mirage to Bill Bryson’s charming Shakespeare to Hermione Lee’s Edith Wharton (which was so incredibly well-researched, but none of the French was translated. I guess Ms. Lee thought the reader would be somewhat fluent in French, but I only took 2 years in high school in nineteen-mumbledy something.).All three books have given me much to ponder on, as an aspiring writer/risk-taker/amateur historian.

    Reply
  30. I’ve been reading nothing but fascinating non-fiction lately, from Nina Burleigh’s Mirage to Bill Bryson’s charming Shakespeare to Hermione Lee’s Edith Wharton (which was so incredibly well-researched, but none of the French was translated. I guess Ms. Lee thought the reader would be somewhat fluent in French, but I only took 2 years in high school in nineteen-mumbledy something.).All three books have given me much to ponder on, as an aspiring writer/risk-taker/amateur historian.

    Reply
  31. Well, now that I’ve jotted down all the recs posted here I’ll add a couple of my own.
    Time and again, I’ll reach for my beloved traditional Regencies and I have one from every lady here that I adore. LOS by Loretta Chase is a must re-read every year. Then I dive into my Rubbermaids and pull out the first book that brings a smile to my face. I’m smiling now thinking of what that might be.
    I am finally reading ‘Mine Until Midnight’ by Lisa Kleypas. I read every line of her books. I haven’t done that for many authors, present company excluded.
    Happy reading to you!

    Reply
  32. Well, now that I’ve jotted down all the recs posted here I’ll add a couple of my own.
    Time and again, I’ll reach for my beloved traditional Regencies and I have one from every lady here that I adore. LOS by Loretta Chase is a must re-read every year. Then I dive into my Rubbermaids and pull out the first book that brings a smile to my face. I’m smiling now thinking of what that might be.
    I am finally reading ‘Mine Until Midnight’ by Lisa Kleypas. I read every line of her books. I haven’t done that for many authors, present company excluded.
    Happy reading to you!

    Reply
  33. Well, now that I’ve jotted down all the recs posted here I’ll add a couple of my own.
    Time and again, I’ll reach for my beloved traditional Regencies and I have one from every lady here that I adore. LOS by Loretta Chase is a must re-read every year. Then I dive into my Rubbermaids and pull out the first book that brings a smile to my face. I’m smiling now thinking of what that might be.
    I am finally reading ‘Mine Until Midnight’ by Lisa Kleypas. I read every line of her books. I haven’t done that for many authors, present company excluded.
    Happy reading to you!

    Reply
  34. Well, now that I’ve jotted down all the recs posted here I’ll add a couple of my own.
    Time and again, I’ll reach for my beloved traditional Regencies and I have one from every lady here that I adore. LOS by Loretta Chase is a must re-read every year. Then I dive into my Rubbermaids and pull out the first book that brings a smile to my face. I’m smiling now thinking of what that might be.
    I am finally reading ‘Mine Until Midnight’ by Lisa Kleypas. I read every line of her books. I haven’t done that for many authors, present company excluded.
    Happy reading to you!

    Reply
  35. Well, now that I’ve jotted down all the recs posted here I’ll add a couple of my own.
    Time and again, I’ll reach for my beloved traditional Regencies and I have one from every lady here that I adore. LOS by Loretta Chase is a must re-read every year. Then I dive into my Rubbermaids and pull out the first book that brings a smile to my face. I’m smiling now thinking of what that might be.
    I am finally reading ‘Mine Until Midnight’ by Lisa Kleypas. I read every line of her books. I haven’t done that for many authors, present company excluded.
    Happy reading to you!

    Reply
  36. The Spymaster’s Lady is a wonderful story. I didn’t want to put it down. Also, Untouched by Anna Campbell was such a different kind of story where the hero and heroine really had to work for their HEA.

    Reply
  37. The Spymaster’s Lady is a wonderful story. I didn’t want to put it down. Also, Untouched by Anna Campbell was such a different kind of story where the hero and heroine really had to work for their HEA.

    Reply
  38. The Spymaster’s Lady is a wonderful story. I didn’t want to put it down. Also, Untouched by Anna Campbell was such a different kind of story where the hero and heroine really had to work for their HEA.

    Reply
  39. The Spymaster’s Lady is a wonderful story. I didn’t want to put it down. Also, Untouched by Anna Campbell was such a different kind of story where the hero and heroine really had to work for their HEA.

    Reply
  40. The Spymaster’s Lady is a wonderful story. I didn’t want to put it down. Also, Untouched by Anna Campbell was such a different kind of story where the hero and heroine really had to work for their HEA.

    Reply
  41. Anything by Julia Ross, Lisa Kleypas and Julie Garwood are my comfort reads. I just read “Silent Run” by Barbara Freethy, which I finished in one day. I’m looking forward to her new release “Silent Fall,” as well as “Your Scandalous Ways” and Patricia Potter’s “Catch A Shadow.”

    Reply
  42. Anything by Julia Ross, Lisa Kleypas and Julie Garwood are my comfort reads. I just read “Silent Run” by Barbara Freethy, which I finished in one day. I’m looking forward to her new release “Silent Fall,” as well as “Your Scandalous Ways” and Patricia Potter’s “Catch A Shadow.”

    Reply
  43. Anything by Julia Ross, Lisa Kleypas and Julie Garwood are my comfort reads. I just read “Silent Run” by Barbara Freethy, which I finished in one day. I’m looking forward to her new release “Silent Fall,” as well as “Your Scandalous Ways” and Patricia Potter’s “Catch A Shadow.”

    Reply
  44. Anything by Julia Ross, Lisa Kleypas and Julie Garwood are my comfort reads. I just read “Silent Run” by Barbara Freethy, which I finished in one day. I’m looking forward to her new release “Silent Fall,” as well as “Your Scandalous Ways” and Patricia Potter’s “Catch A Shadow.”

    Reply
  45. Anything by Julia Ross, Lisa Kleypas and Julie Garwood are my comfort reads. I just read “Silent Run” by Barbara Freethy, which I finished in one day. I’m looking forward to her new release “Silent Fall,” as well as “Your Scandalous Ways” and Patricia Potter’s “Catch A Shadow.”

    Reply
  46. I just finished a couple of Lindsey Davis’ Marcus Didius Falco mysteries. They take place in the 70s AD in Rome and environs. Good books.
    Just started fellow WW’s A Ladies Secret, another good book.

    Reply
  47. I just finished a couple of Lindsey Davis’ Marcus Didius Falco mysteries. They take place in the 70s AD in Rome and environs. Good books.
    Just started fellow WW’s A Ladies Secret, another good book.

    Reply
  48. I just finished a couple of Lindsey Davis’ Marcus Didius Falco mysteries. They take place in the 70s AD in Rome and environs. Good books.
    Just started fellow WW’s A Ladies Secret, another good book.

    Reply
  49. I just finished a couple of Lindsey Davis’ Marcus Didius Falco mysteries. They take place in the 70s AD in Rome and environs. Good books.
    Just started fellow WW’s A Ladies Secret, another good book.

    Reply
  50. I just finished a couple of Lindsey Davis’ Marcus Didius Falco mysteries. They take place in the 70s AD in Rome and environs. Good books.
    Just started fellow WW’s A Ladies Secret, another good book.

    Reply
  51. I second Untouched by Anna Campbell. I just finished it way past my bedtime last night.
    The hero is so unusual, almost an anti-alpha. His situation has rendered him powerless, so his strength is shown in his ability to endure and eventually come to an ultimate decision.
    Also, I recently finished Simply Sexual by Kate Pearce. Astonishing. Moving. Erotic.

    Reply
  52. I second Untouched by Anna Campbell. I just finished it way past my bedtime last night.
    The hero is so unusual, almost an anti-alpha. His situation has rendered him powerless, so his strength is shown in his ability to endure and eventually come to an ultimate decision.
    Also, I recently finished Simply Sexual by Kate Pearce. Astonishing. Moving. Erotic.

    Reply
  53. I second Untouched by Anna Campbell. I just finished it way past my bedtime last night.
    The hero is so unusual, almost an anti-alpha. His situation has rendered him powerless, so his strength is shown in his ability to endure and eventually come to an ultimate decision.
    Also, I recently finished Simply Sexual by Kate Pearce. Astonishing. Moving. Erotic.

    Reply
  54. I second Untouched by Anna Campbell. I just finished it way past my bedtime last night.
    The hero is so unusual, almost an anti-alpha. His situation has rendered him powerless, so his strength is shown in his ability to endure and eventually come to an ultimate decision.
    Also, I recently finished Simply Sexual by Kate Pearce. Astonishing. Moving. Erotic.

    Reply
  55. I second Untouched by Anna Campbell. I just finished it way past my bedtime last night.
    The hero is so unusual, almost an anti-alpha. His situation has rendered him powerless, so his strength is shown in his ability to endure and eventually come to an ultimate decision.
    Also, I recently finished Simply Sexual by Kate Pearce. Astonishing. Moving. Erotic.

    Reply
  56. I envy you this reading time! I think the only thing I’ve had time to read these last few weeks has been Teresa Rebeck’s ARC from the Ninc conference on the airplane, and I’m so buried since I came home, I have no idea where in the rubble it is so I could at least be certain I spelled her name right. I haven’t had time to finish it, but it’s a screenwriter’s take on fame and fortune striking three teenage sisters. Great characterization. Just came out last week, I think. I hope I find it so I can see how it ends!

    Reply
  57. I envy you this reading time! I think the only thing I’ve had time to read these last few weeks has been Teresa Rebeck’s ARC from the Ninc conference on the airplane, and I’m so buried since I came home, I have no idea where in the rubble it is so I could at least be certain I spelled her name right. I haven’t had time to finish it, but it’s a screenwriter’s take on fame and fortune striking three teenage sisters. Great characterization. Just came out last week, I think. I hope I find it so I can see how it ends!

    Reply
  58. I envy you this reading time! I think the only thing I’ve had time to read these last few weeks has been Teresa Rebeck’s ARC from the Ninc conference on the airplane, and I’m so buried since I came home, I have no idea where in the rubble it is so I could at least be certain I spelled her name right. I haven’t had time to finish it, but it’s a screenwriter’s take on fame and fortune striking three teenage sisters. Great characterization. Just came out last week, I think. I hope I find it so I can see how it ends!

    Reply
  59. I envy you this reading time! I think the only thing I’ve had time to read these last few weeks has been Teresa Rebeck’s ARC from the Ninc conference on the airplane, and I’m so buried since I came home, I have no idea where in the rubble it is so I could at least be certain I spelled her name right. I haven’t had time to finish it, but it’s a screenwriter’s take on fame and fortune striking three teenage sisters. Great characterization. Just came out last week, I think. I hope I find it so I can see how it ends!

    Reply
  60. I envy you this reading time! I think the only thing I’ve had time to read these last few weeks has been Teresa Rebeck’s ARC from the Ninc conference on the airplane, and I’m so buried since I came home, I have no idea where in the rubble it is so I could at least be certain I spelled her name right. I haven’t had time to finish it, but it’s a screenwriter’s take on fame and fortune striking three teenage sisters. Great characterization. Just came out last week, I think. I hope I find it so I can see how it ends!

    Reply
  61. Very different, very poignant, and simply very, very good: “The Book Thief” by Markus Zukas. It takes place in Munich in WWII and is narrated by Death. It’s a difficult book to describe but it’s quite wonderful, and the characters and incidents will stay with me a very long time.
    I second the rec for Tracy Grant’s “Secrets of a Lady”, which I read when it was published as “Daughter of the Game” (a title I preferred) and then again recently in its new incarnation. If you go to her website, she’s got a section with letters sent to/from the characters in the book. It’s a clever way of adding depth and insight and just plain fun.
    Happy reading!

    Reply
  62. Very different, very poignant, and simply very, very good: “The Book Thief” by Markus Zukas. It takes place in Munich in WWII and is narrated by Death. It’s a difficult book to describe but it’s quite wonderful, and the characters and incidents will stay with me a very long time.
    I second the rec for Tracy Grant’s “Secrets of a Lady”, which I read when it was published as “Daughter of the Game” (a title I preferred) and then again recently in its new incarnation. If you go to her website, she’s got a section with letters sent to/from the characters in the book. It’s a clever way of adding depth and insight and just plain fun.
    Happy reading!

    Reply
  63. Very different, very poignant, and simply very, very good: “The Book Thief” by Markus Zukas. It takes place in Munich in WWII and is narrated by Death. It’s a difficult book to describe but it’s quite wonderful, and the characters and incidents will stay with me a very long time.
    I second the rec for Tracy Grant’s “Secrets of a Lady”, which I read when it was published as “Daughter of the Game” (a title I preferred) and then again recently in its new incarnation. If you go to her website, she’s got a section with letters sent to/from the characters in the book. It’s a clever way of adding depth and insight and just plain fun.
    Happy reading!

    Reply
  64. Very different, very poignant, and simply very, very good: “The Book Thief” by Markus Zukas. It takes place in Munich in WWII and is narrated by Death. It’s a difficult book to describe but it’s quite wonderful, and the characters and incidents will stay with me a very long time.
    I second the rec for Tracy Grant’s “Secrets of a Lady”, which I read when it was published as “Daughter of the Game” (a title I preferred) and then again recently in its new incarnation. If you go to her website, she’s got a section with letters sent to/from the characters in the book. It’s a clever way of adding depth and insight and just plain fun.
    Happy reading!

    Reply
  65. Very different, very poignant, and simply very, very good: “The Book Thief” by Markus Zukas. It takes place in Munich in WWII and is narrated by Death. It’s a difficult book to describe but it’s quite wonderful, and the characters and incidents will stay with me a very long time.
    I second the rec for Tracy Grant’s “Secrets of a Lady”, which I read when it was published as “Daughter of the Game” (a title I preferred) and then again recently in its new incarnation. If you go to her website, she’s got a section with letters sent to/from the characters in the book. It’s a clever way of adding depth and insight and just plain fun.
    Happy reading!

    Reply
  66. I just read And Only to Deceive by Tasha Alexander, which is a sort of Victorian coming of age story about (among other things) a young widow who doesn’t begin to know and appreciate her dead husband until after he’s gone — but does appreciate the freedom her new status gives her. Cleverly written and emotionally engaging. I am about to start the sequel, A Poisoned Season.

    Reply
  67. I just read And Only to Deceive by Tasha Alexander, which is a sort of Victorian coming of age story about (among other things) a young widow who doesn’t begin to know and appreciate her dead husband until after he’s gone — but does appreciate the freedom her new status gives her. Cleverly written and emotionally engaging. I am about to start the sequel, A Poisoned Season.

    Reply
  68. I just read And Only to Deceive by Tasha Alexander, which is a sort of Victorian coming of age story about (among other things) a young widow who doesn’t begin to know and appreciate her dead husband until after he’s gone — but does appreciate the freedom her new status gives her. Cleverly written and emotionally engaging. I am about to start the sequel, A Poisoned Season.

    Reply
  69. I just read And Only to Deceive by Tasha Alexander, which is a sort of Victorian coming of age story about (among other things) a young widow who doesn’t begin to know and appreciate her dead husband until after he’s gone — but does appreciate the freedom her new status gives her. Cleverly written and emotionally engaging. I am about to start the sequel, A Poisoned Season.

    Reply
  70. I just read And Only to Deceive by Tasha Alexander, which is a sort of Victorian coming of age story about (among other things) a young widow who doesn’t begin to know and appreciate her dead husband until after he’s gone — but does appreciate the freedom her new status gives her. Cleverly written and emotionally engaging. I am about to start the sequel, A Poisoned Season.

    Reply
  71. Oh, my, I second The Spymaster’s Lady by Bourne, and Untouched by Campbell. Both were excellent and, to quote Georgette, “out of the common way.”
    My favorite recommendation to anyone these days is Deanna Raybourn’s “Silent in the Grave.” I guess you’d call it an historical mystery with romantic elements (it’s been nominated for Agatha and Rita awards). Somehow it just hit my sweet spot and I even dreamed about the hero. It has, in my opinion, one of the best first paragraphs ever written:
    “To say that I met Nicholas Brisbane over my husband’s dead body is not entirely accurate.
    Edward, it should be noted, was still twitching upon the floor.”

    Reply
  72. Oh, my, I second The Spymaster’s Lady by Bourne, and Untouched by Campbell. Both were excellent and, to quote Georgette, “out of the common way.”
    My favorite recommendation to anyone these days is Deanna Raybourn’s “Silent in the Grave.” I guess you’d call it an historical mystery with romantic elements (it’s been nominated for Agatha and Rita awards). Somehow it just hit my sweet spot and I even dreamed about the hero. It has, in my opinion, one of the best first paragraphs ever written:
    “To say that I met Nicholas Brisbane over my husband’s dead body is not entirely accurate.
    Edward, it should be noted, was still twitching upon the floor.”

    Reply
  73. Oh, my, I second The Spymaster’s Lady by Bourne, and Untouched by Campbell. Both were excellent and, to quote Georgette, “out of the common way.”
    My favorite recommendation to anyone these days is Deanna Raybourn’s “Silent in the Grave.” I guess you’d call it an historical mystery with romantic elements (it’s been nominated for Agatha and Rita awards). Somehow it just hit my sweet spot and I even dreamed about the hero. It has, in my opinion, one of the best first paragraphs ever written:
    “To say that I met Nicholas Brisbane over my husband’s dead body is not entirely accurate.
    Edward, it should be noted, was still twitching upon the floor.”

    Reply
  74. Oh, my, I second The Spymaster’s Lady by Bourne, and Untouched by Campbell. Both were excellent and, to quote Georgette, “out of the common way.”
    My favorite recommendation to anyone these days is Deanna Raybourn’s “Silent in the Grave.” I guess you’d call it an historical mystery with romantic elements (it’s been nominated for Agatha and Rita awards). Somehow it just hit my sweet spot and I even dreamed about the hero. It has, in my opinion, one of the best first paragraphs ever written:
    “To say that I met Nicholas Brisbane over my husband’s dead body is not entirely accurate.
    Edward, it should be noted, was still twitching upon the floor.”

    Reply
  75. Oh, my, I second The Spymaster’s Lady by Bourne, and Untouched by Campbell. Both were excellent and, to quote Georgette, “out of the common way.”
    My favorite recommendation to anyone these days is Deanna Raybourn’s “Silent in the Grave.” I guess you’d call it an historical mystery with romantic elements (it’s been nominated for Agatha and Rita awards). Somehow it just hit my sweet spot and I even dreamed about the hero. It has, in my opinion, one of the best first paragraphs ever written:
    “To say that I met Nicholas Brisbane over my husband’s dead body is not entirely accurate.
    Edward, it should be noted, was still twitching upon the floor.”

    Reply
  76. NOTE: The person who posted as “tal” above is not me.
    I always recommend Anne Bishop’s Black Jewels Trilogy (dark fantasy) and Sharon Lee and Steve Miller’s Liaden saga (PARTNERS IN NECESSITY is an omnibus of the first three books). Just reread Tanya Huff’s The Keeper Chronicles (funny/scary contemporary urban fantasy, with talking cats) and Beatrice Brandon’s THE CLIFFS OF NIGHT (like Mary Stewar–from 1973–with a spirited American heroine in Ireland, a clandestine search for ancient treasure, drug smuggling, murder, and possibly a pterodactyl.
    I can always reread Roberts/Robb, Krentz/Quick/Castle, Lowell’s mysteries and romantic suspense, and Mercedes Lackey.
    Really good recent discoveries:
    Michele Sagara’s CAST IN series–fantasy police procedurals
    C.E. Murphy’s URBAN SHAMAN and its sequels
    Moira J. Moore’s RESENTING THE HERO, THE HERO STRIKES BACK, and HEROES ADRIFT (fantasy)
    Shanna Swendson’s Katie Chandler series, starting with ENCHANTED, INC.–chick lit meets urban fantasy, with a sexy hero

    Reply
  77. NOTE: The person who posted as “tal” above is not me.
    I always recommend Anne Bishop’s Black Jewels Trilogy (dark fantasy) and Sharon Lee and Steve Miller’s Liaden saga (PARTNERS IN NECESSITY is an omnibus of the first three books). Just reread Tanya Huff’s The Keeper Chronicles (funny/scary contemporary urban fantasy, with talking cats) and Beatrice Brandon’s THE CLIFFS OF NIGHT (like Mary Stewar–from 1973–with a spirited American heroine in Ireland, a clandestine search for ancient treasure, drug smuggling, murder, and possibly a pterodactyl.
    I can always reread Roberts/Robb, Krentz/Quick/Castle, Lowell’s mysteries and romantic suspense, and Mercedes Lackey.
    Really good recent discoveries:
    Michele Sagara’s CAST IN series–fantasy police procedurals
    C.E. Murphy’s URBAN SHAMAN and its sequels
    Moira J. Moore’s RESENTING THE HERO, THE HERO STRIKES BACK, and HEROES ADRIFT (fantasy)
    Shanna Swendson’s Katie Chandler series, starting with ENCHANTED, INC.–chick lit meets urban fantasy, with a sexy hero

    Reply
  78. NOTE: The person who posted as “tal” above is not me.
    I always recommend Anne Bishop’s Black Jewels Trilogy (dark fantasy) and Sharon Lee and Steve Miller’s Liaden saga (PARTNERS IN NECESSITY is an omnibus of the first three books). Just reread Tanya Huff’s The Keeper Chronicles (funny/scary contemporary urban fantasy, with talking cats) and Beatrice Brandon’s THE CLIFFS OF NIGHT (like Mary Stewar–from 1973–with a spirited American heroine in Ireland, a clandestine search for ancient treasure, drug smuggling, murder, and possibly a pterodactyl.
    I can always reread Roberts/Robb, Krentz/Quick/Castle, Lowell’s mysteries and romantic suspense, and Mercedes Lackey.
    Really good recent discoveries:
    Michele Sagara’s CAST IN series–fantasy police procedurals
    C.E. Murphy’s URBAN SHAMAN and its sequels
    Moira J. Moore’s RESENTING THE HERO, THE HERO STRIKES BACK, and HEROES ADRIFT (fantasy)
    Shanna Swendson’s Katie Chandler series, starting with ENCHANTED, INC.–chick lit meets urban fantasy, with a sexy hero

    Reply
  79. NOTE: The person who posted as “tal” above is not me.
    I always recommend Anne Bishop’s Black Jewels Trilogy (dark fantasy) and Sharon Lee and Steve Miller’s Liaden saga (PARTNERS IN NECESSITY is an omnibus of the first three books). Just reread Tanya Huff’s The Keeper Chronicles (funny/scary contemporary urban fantasy, with talking cats) and Beatrice Brandon’s THE CLIFFS OF NIGHT (like Mary Stewar–from 1973–with a spirited American heroine in Ireland, a clandestine search for ancient treasure, drug smuggling, murder, and possibly a pterodactyl.
    I can always reread Roberts/Robb, Krentz/Quick/Castle, Lowell’s mysteries and romantic suspense, and Mercedes Lackey.
    Really good recent discoveries:
    Michele Sagara’s CAST IN series–fantasy police procedurals
    C.E. Murphy’s URBAN SHAMAN and its sequels
    Moira J. Moore’s RESENTING THE HERO, THE HERO STRIKES BACK, and HEROES ADRIFT (fantasy)
    Shanna Swendson’s Katie Chandler series, starting with ENCHANTED, INC.–chick lit meets urban fantasy, with a sexy hero

    Reply
  80. NOTE: The person who posted as “tal” above is not me.
    I always recommend Anne Bishop’s Black Jewels Trilogy (dark fantasy) and Sharon Lee and Steve Miller’s Liaden saga (PARTNERS IN NECESSITY is an omnibus of the first three books). Just reread Tanya Huff’s The Keeper Chronicles (funny/scary contemporary urban fantasy, with talking cats) and Beatrice Brandon’s THE CLIFFS OF NIGHT (like Mary Stewar–from 1973–with a spirited American heroine in Ireland, a clandestine search for ancient treasure, drug smuggling, murder, and possibly a pterodactyl.
    I can always reread Roberts/Robb, Krentz/Quick/Castle, Lowell’s mysteries and romantic suspense, and Mercedes Lackey.
    Really good recent discoveries:
    Michele Sagara’s CAST IN series–fantasy police procedurals
    C.E. Murphy’s URBAN SHAMAN and its sequels
    Moira J. Moore’s RESENTING THE HERO, THE HERO STRIKES BACK, and HEROES ADRIFT (fantasy)
    Shanna Swendson’s Katie Chandler series, starting with ENCHANTED, INC.–chick lit meets urban fantasy, with a sexy hero

    Reply
  81. Chiming in to recommend The Spymaster’s Lady, one of the best ever, I’d put it up top. Also, Untouched was very good, and one more on my top reads last year was Jo Goodman’s If His Kiss is Wicked – a great hero who’s not an alpha yet strong-minded and protective, but willing to stand back and step in only if needed, willing to let his heroine be in charge of herself.

    Reply
  82. Chiming in to recommend The Spymaster’s Lady, one of the best ever, I’d put it up top. Also, Untouched was very good, and one more on my top reads last year was Jo Goodman’s If His Kiss is Wicked – a great hero who’s not an alpha yet strong-minded and protective, but willing to stand back and step in only if needed, willing to let his heroine be in charge of herself.

    Reply
  83. Chiming in to recommend The Spymaster’s Lady, one of the best ever, I’d put it up top. Also, Untouched was very good, and one more on my top reads last year was Jo Goodman’s If His Kiss is Wicked – a great hero who’s not an alpha yet strong-minded and protective, but willing to stand back and step in only if needed, willing to let his heroine be in charge of herself.

    Reply
  84. Chiming in to recommend The Spymaster’s Lady, one of the best ever, I’d put it up top. Also, Untouched was very good, and one more on my top reads last year was Jo Goodman’s If His Kiss is Wicked – a great hero who’s not an alpha yet strong-minded and protective, but willing to stand back and step in only if needed, willing to let his heroine be in charge of herself.

    Reply
  85. Chiming in to recommend The Spymaster’s Lady, one of the best ever, I’d put it up top. Also, Untouched was very good, and one more on my top reads last year was Jo Goodman’s If His Kiss is Wicked – a great hero who’s not an alpha yet strong-minded and protective, but willing to stand back and step in only if needed, willing to let his heroine be in charge of herself.

    Reply
  86. This brings up a question, how do authors, with (perhaps multiple) deadlines, change gears upon completion of a current project? How do you shut off “writer-brain” and give yourselves that necessary, regenerative break? After switching gears, how do you “gear up” again?
    Any special activities or methods?
    I’m not even published, and I can’t seem to turn off writer brain.

    Reply
  87. This brings up a question, how do authors, with (perhaps multiple) deadlines, change gears upon completion of a current project? How do you shut off “writer-brain” and give yourselves that necessary, regenerative break? After switching gears, how do you “gear up” again?
    Any special activities or methods?
    I’m not even published, and I can’t seem to turn off writer brain.

    Reply
  88. This brings up a question, how do authors, with (perhaps multiple) deadlines, change gears upon completion of a current project? How do you shut off “writer-brain” and give yourselves that necessary, regenerative break? After switching gears, how do you “gear up” again?
    Any special activities or methods?
    I’m not even published, and I can’t seem to turn off writer brain.

    Reply
  89. This brings up a question, how do authors, with (perhaps multiple) deadlines, change gears upon completion of a current project? How do you shut off “writer-brain” and give yourselves that necessary, regenerative break? After switching gears, how do you “gear up” again?
    Any special activities or methods?
    I’m not even published, and I can’t seem to turn off writer brain.

    Reply
  90. This brings up a question, how do authors, with (perhaps multiple) deadlines, change gears upon completion of a current project? How do you shut off “writer-brain” and give yourselves that necessary, regenerative break? After switching gears, how do you “gear up” again?
    Any special activities or methods?
    I’m not even published, and I can’t seem to turn off writer brain.

    Reply
  91. I fifth or sixth or seventh The Spymaster’s Lady. Just wonderful. Also, I really enjoyed The Perils of Pleasure by Julie Ann Long.
    For more serious historicals, I like anything by Diana Norman. She is VERY hard on her characters, though, so you have to be in the mood to feel somewhat battered, in a satisfying way.

    Reply
  92. I fifth or sixth or seventh The Spymaster’s Lady. Just wonderful. Also, I really enjoyed The Perils of Pleasure by Julie Ann Long.
    For more serious historicals, I like anything by Diana Norman. She is VERY hard on her characters, though, so you have to be in the mood to feel somewhat battered, in a satisfying way.

    Reply
  93. I fifth or sixth or seventh The Spymaster’s Lady. Just wonderful. Also, I really enjoyed The Perils of Pleasure by Julie Ann Long.
    For more serious historicals, I like anything by Diana Norman. She is VERY hard on her characters, though, so you have to be in the mood to feel somewhat battered, in a satisfying way.

    Reply
  94. I fifth or sixth or seventh The Spymaster’s Lady. Just wonderful. Also, I really enjoyed The Perils of Pleasure by Julie Ann Long.
    For more serious historicals, I like anything by Diana Norman. She is VERY hard on her characters, though, so you have to be in the mood to feel somewhat battered, in a satisfying way.

    Reply
  95. I fifth or sixth or seventh The Spymaster’s Lady. Just wonderful. Also, I really enjoyed The Perils of Pleasure by Julie Ann Long.
    For more serious historicals, I like anything by Diana Norman. She is VERY hard on her characters, though, so you have to be in the mood to feel somewhat battered, in a satisfying way.

    Reply
  96. In nonfiction, Nancy Goldstone’s Four Queens was a breeze to read, full of interesting politicking and medieval color.

    Reply
  97. In nonfiction, Nancy Goldstone’s Four Queens was a breeze to read, full of interesting politicking and medieval color.

    Reply
  98. In nonfiction, Nancy Goldstone’s Four Queens was a breeze to read, full of interesting politicking and medieval color.

    Reply
  99. In nonfiction, Nancy Goldstone’s Four Queens was a breeze to read, full of interesting politicking and medieval color.

    Reply
  100. In nonfiction, Nancy Goldstone’s Four Queens was a breeze to read, full of interesting politicking and medieval color.

    Reply
  101. The problem is trying to figure out what you have already read– and to try to find something a little different. In the “probably already read” category (and excluding works by wenches themselves) I love Mary Balogh’s Slightly series- especially Scandalous, wicked, dangerous. In the world of Austen extenders (which I have found somewhat disappointing) I like “An assembly such as this”, and the two books that follow. In my reading mystery days (again probably already read) my favorites were of course, Dorothy Sayers, Laurie King, Elizabeth Peters, and Amanda Cross. Joanne Dobson is less well known, and fun if you like mysteries that are quite obviously written by a literature professor.
    In addition to Jane Austen, the books that I re-read most often these days are the Balogh books above, and Mary Jo’s the Diabolical Baron, The Rake, and The Marriage Spell. I used to re-read Sayers Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon, the Beekeeper’s Apprentice, and the Crocodile on the Sandbank. Iain Pears has some interesting mysteries with an art history base.
    Merry

    Reply
  102. The problem is trying to figure out what you have already read– and to try to find something a little different. In the “probably already read” category (and excluding works by wenches themselves) I love Mary Balogh’s Slightly series- especially Scandalous, wicked, dangerous. In the world of Austen extenders (which I have found somewhat disappointing) I like “An assembly such as this”, and the two books that follow. In my reading mystery days (again probably already read) my favorites were of course, Dorothy Sayers, Laurie King, Elizabeth Peters, and Amanda Cross. Joanne Dobson is less well known, and fun if you like mysteries that are quite obviously written by a literature professor.
    In addition to Jane Austen, the books that I re-read most often these days are the Balogh books above, and Mary Jo’s the Diabolical Baron, The Rake, and The Marriage Spell. I used to re-read Sayers Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon, the Beekeeper’s Apprentice, and the Crocodile on the Sandbank. Iain Pears has some interesting mysteries with an art history base.
    Merry

    Reply
  103. The problem is trying to figure out what you have already read– and to try to find something a little different. In the “probably already read” category (and excluding works by wenches themselves) I love Mary Balogh’s Slightly series- especially Scandalous, wicked, dangerous. In the world of Austen extenders (which I have found somewhat disappointing) I like “An assembly such as this”, and the two books that follow. In my reading mystery days (again probably already read) my favorites were of course, Dorothy Sayers, Laurie King, Elizabeth Peters, and Amanda Cross. Joanne Dobson is less well known, and fun if you like mysteries that are quite obviously written by a literature professor.
    In addition to Jane Austen, the books that I re-read most often these days are the Balogh books above, and Mary Jo’s the Diabolical Baron, The Rake, and The Marriage Spell. I used to re-read Sayers Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon, the Beekeeper’s Apprentice, and the Crocodile on the Sandbank. Iain Pears has some interesting mysteries with an art history base.
    Merry

    Reply
  104. The problem is trying to figure out what you have already read– and to try to find something a little different. In the “probably already read” category (and excluding works by wenches themselves) I love Mary Balogh’s Slightly series- especially Scandalous, wicked, dangerous. In the world of Austen extenders (which I have found somewhat disappointing) I like “An assembly such as this”, and the two books that follow. In my reading mystery days (again probably already read) my favorites were of course, Dorothy Sayers, Laurie King, Elizabeth Peters, and Amanda Cross. Joanne Dobson is less well known, and fun if you like mysteries that are quite obviously written by a literature professor.
    In addition to Jane Austen, the books that I re-read most often these days are the Balogh books above, and Mary Jo’s the Diabolical Baron, The Rake, and The Marriage Spell. I used to re-read Sayers Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon, the Beekeeper’s Apprentice, and the Crocodile on the Sandbank. Iain Pears has some interesting mysteries with an art history base.
    Merry

    Reply
  105. The problem is trying to figure out what you have already read– and to try to find something a little different. In the “probably already read” category (and excluding works by wenches themselves) I love Mary Balogh’s Slightly series- especially Scandalous, wicked, dangerous. In the world of Austen extenders (which I have found somewhat disappointing) I like “An assembly such as this”, and the two books that follow. In my reading mystery days (again probably already read) my favorites were of course, Dorothy Sayers, Laurie King, Elizabeth Peters, and Amanda Cross. Joanne Dobson is less well known, and fun if you like mysteries that are quite obviously written by a literature professor.
    In addition to Jane Austen, the books that I re-read most often these days are the Balogh books above, and Mary Jo’s the Diabolical Baron, The Rake, and The Marriage Spell. I used to re-read Sayers Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon, the Beekeeper’s Apprentice, and the Crocodile on the Sandbank. Iain Pears has some interesting mysteries with an art history base.
    Merry

    Reply
  106. These are fabulous suggestions!
    Thanks for so many great reminders of books I have been wanting to read. I’ll make a list and go out searching … several of these I own, so I’d better look around here first. 😉
    Jane, that’s a great question. The short answer is, it’s not easy to turn off writer’s brain at any stage, but there are ways to get around the fact that it’s constantly on. The deeper I get into writing a book, the less I can read outside the manuscript and research. I stay away from reading historical romance while writing it, and the same for the mainstream historicals, too. During the writing of a book, I tend to read outside my own area at that stage — contemporaries, mysteries, kids’ books, and nonfiction.
    Once the book is in, then it’s time to clear the brain before I can start reading again (and before I can start, or go back to, another WIP). First I need some kind of three-dimensional, short-term project — housecleaning HAS to be done, but at that point I actually enjoy it (a little). And then I try to blow through something like painting walls or stripping wallpaper. I’ll take a break, get some sun, hang out with friends, make up for lost time…so for a week or two I don’t use my writer’s brain much.
    Though I will say it seems pretty impossible to turn off the writer’s voice in the head entirely.
    Then I get that hankerin’ to READ, and the urge to WRITE builds up again. So a reading holiday, along with non-reading creative stuff (especially 3D-physical instead of the 2D-mental work of writing) helps fill the well.
    And I really need to paint my kitchen anyway, so I’m going out to look at paint chips…
    Susan

    Reply
  107. These are fabulous suggestions!
    Thanks for so many great reminders of books I have been wanting to read. I’ll make a list and go out searching … several of these I own, so I’d better look around here first. 😉
    Jane, that’s a great question. The short answer is, it’s not easy to turn off writer’s brain at any stage, but there are ways to get around the fact that it’s constantly on. The deeper I get into writing a book, the less I can read outside the manuscript and research. I stay away from reading historical romance while writing it, and the same for the mainstream historicals, too. During the writing of a book, I tend to read outside my own area at that stage — contemporaries, mysteries, kids’ books, and nonfiction.
    Once the book is in, then it’s time to clear the brain before I can start reading again (and before I can start, or go back to, another WIP). First I need some kind of three-dimensional, short-term project — housecleaning HAS to be done, but at that point I actually enjoy it (a little). And then I try to blow through something like painting walls or stripping wallpaper. I’ll take a break, get some sun, hang out with friends, make up for lost time…so for a week or two I don’t use my writer’s brain much.
    Though I will say it seems pretty impossible to turn off the writer’s voice in the head entirely.
    Then I get that hankerin’ to READ, and the urge to WRITE builds up again. So a reading holiday, along with non-reading creative stuff (especially 3D-physical instead of the 2D-mental work of writing) helps fill the well.
    And I really need to paint my kitchen anyway, so I’m going out to look at paint chips…
    Susan

    Reply
  108. These are fabulous suggestions!
    Thanks for so many great reminders of books I have been wanting to read. I’ll make a list and go out searching … several of these I own, so I’d better look around here first. 😉
    Jane, that’s a great question. The short answer is, it’s not easy to turn off writer’s brain at any stage, but there are ways to get around the fact that it’s constantly on. The deeper I get into writing a book, the less I can read outside the manuscript and research. I stay away from reading historical romance while writing it, and the same for the mainstream historicals, too. During the writing of a book, I tend to read outside my own area at that stage — contemporaries, mysteries, kids’ books, and nonfiction.
    Once the book is in, then it’s time to clear the brain before I can start reading again (and before I can start, or go back to, another WIP). First I need some kind of three-dimensional, short-term project — housecleaning HAS to be done, but at that point I actually enjoy it (a little). And then I try to blow through something like painting walls or stripping wallpaper. I’ll take a break, get some sun, hang out with friends, make up for lost time…so for a week or two I don’t use my writer’s brain much.
    Though I will say it seems pretty impossible to turn off the writer’s voice in the head entirely.
    Then I get that hankerin’ to READ, and the urge to WRITE builds up again. So a reading holiday, along with non-reading creative stuff (especially 3D-physical instead of the 2D-mental work of writing) helps fill the well.
    And I really need to paint my kitchen anyway, so I’m going out to look at paint chips…
    Susan

    Reply
  109. These are fabulous suggestions!
    Thanks for so many great reminders of books I have been wanting to read. I’ll make a list and go out searching … several of these I own, so I’d better look around here first. 😉
    Jane, that’s a great question. The short answer is, it’s not easy to turn off writer’s brain at any stage, but there are ways to get around the fact that it’s constantly on. The deeper I get into writing a book, the less I can read outside the manuscript and research. I stay away from reading historical romance while writing it, and the same for the mainstream historicals, too. During the writing of a book, I tend to read outside my own area at that stage — contemporaries, mysteries, kids’ books, and nonfiction.
    Once the book is in, then it’s time to clear the brain before I can start reading again (and before I can start, or go back to, another WIP). First I need some kind of three-dimensional, short-term project — housecleaning HAS to be done, but at that point I actually enjoy it (a little). And then I try to blow through something like painting walls or stripping wallpaper. I’ll take a break, get some sun, hang out with friends, make up for lost time…so for a week or two I don’t use my writer’s brain much.
    Though I will say it seems pretty impossible to turn off the writer’s voice in the head entirely.
    Then I get that hankerin’ to READ, and the urge to WRITE builds up again. So a reading holiday, along with non-reading creative stuff (especially 3D-physical instead of the 2D-mental work of writing) helps fill the well.
    And I really need to paint my kitchen anyway, so I’m going out to look at paint chips…
    Susan

    Reply
  110. These are fabulous suggestions!
    Thanks for so many great reminders of books I have been wanting to read. I’ll make a list and go out searching … several of these I own, so I’d better look around here first. 😉
    Jane, that’s a great question. The short answer is, it’s not easy to turn off writer’s brain at any stage, but there are ways to get around the fact that it’s constantly on. The deeper I get into writing a book, the less I can read outside the manuscript and research. I stay away from reading historical romance while writing it, and the same for the mainstream historicals, too. During the writing of a book, I tend to read outside my own area at that stage — contemporaries, mysteries, kids’ books, and nonfiction.
    Once the book is in, then it’s time to clear the brain before I can start reading again (and before I can start, or go back to, another WIP). First I need some kind of three-dimensional, short-term project — housecleaning HAS to be done, but at that point I actually enjoy it (a little). And then I try to blow through something like painting walls or stripping wallpaper. I’ll take a break, get some sun, hang out with friends, make up for lost time…so for a week or two I don’t use my writer’s brain much.
    Though I will say it seems pretty impossible to turn off the writer’s voice in the head entirely.
    Then I get that hankerin’ to READ, and the urge to WRITE builds up again. So a reading holiday, along with non-reading creative stuff (especially 3D-physical instead of the 2D-mental work of writing) helps fill the well.
    And I really need to paint my kitchen anyway, so I’m going out to look at paint chips…
    Susan

    Reply
  111. I just finished Jo’s A Lady’s Secret, and it was all that I expect a Jo Beverley book to be–engaging, intelligent, and a delight to read.
    I echo the recommendations of Joanna Bourne, Diana Rayborne, Anna Campbell, and Tracy Grant. To those I add Sherry Thomas’s Private Arrangements, another debut historical that is left me eager for the author’s second book, and Lisa Kleypas’s Blue-Eyed Devil, LK’s second contemporary. If you have not read Connie Brockway’s Skinny Dipping and Deborah Smith’s Rita-nominated A Gentle Rain, both are extraordinary stories that I finished and immediately put on my special reread shelf.

    Reply
  112. I just finished Jo’s A Lady’s Secret, and it was all that I expect a Jo Beverley book to be–engaging, intelligent, and a delight to read.
    I echo the recommendations of Joanna Bourne, Diana Rayborne, Anna Campbell, and Tracy Grant. To those I add Sherry Thomas’s Private Arrangements, another debut historical that is left me eager for the author’s second book, and Lisa Kleypas’s Blue-Eyed Devil, LK’s second contemporary. If you have not read Connie Brockway’s Skinny Dipping and Deborah Smith’s Rita-nominated A Gentle Rain, both are extraordinary stories that I finished and immediately put on my special reread shelf.

    Reply
  113. I just finished Jo’s A Lady’s Secret, and it was all that I expect a Jo Beverley book to be–engaging, intelligent, and a delight to read.
    I echo the recommendations of Joanna Bourne, Diana Rayborne, Anna Campbell, and Tracy Grant. To those I add Sherry Thomas’s Private Arrangements, another debut historical that is left me eager for the author’s second book, and Lisa Kleypas’s Blue-Eyed Devil, LK’s second contemporary. If you have not read Connie Brockway’s Skinny Dipping and Deborah Smith’s Rita-nominated A Gentle Rain, both are extraordinary stories that I finished and immediately put on my special reread shelf.

    Reply
  114. I just finished Jo’s A Lady’s Secret, and it was all that I expect a Jo Beverley book to be–engaging, intelligent, and a delight to read.
    I echo the recommendations of Joanna Bourne, Diana Rayborne, Anna Campbell, and Tracy Grant. To those I add Sherry Thomas’s Private Arrangements, another debut historical that is left me eager for the author’s second book, and Lisa Kleypas’s Blue-Eyed Devil, LK’s second contemporary. If you have not read Connie Brockway’s Skinny Dipping and Deborah Smith’s Rita-nominated A Gentle Rain, both are extraordinary stories that I finished and immediately put on my special reread shelf.

    Reply
  115. I just finished Jo’s A Lady’s Secret, and it was all that I expect a Jo Beverley book to be–engaging, intelligent, and a delight to read.
    I echo the recommendations of Joanna Bourne, Diana Rayborne, Anna Campbell, and Tracy Grant. To those I add Sherry Thomas’s Private Arrangements, another debut historical that is left me eager for the author’s second book, and Lisa Kleypas’s Blue-Eyed Devil, LK’s second contemporary. If you have not read Connie Brockway’s Skinny Dipping and Deborah Smith’s Rita-nominated A Gentle Rain, both are extraordinary stories that I finished and immediately put on my special reread shelf.

    Reply
  116. Hi, I just finished up Rowena Cherry’s book Forced MAte. It was quite good and now I am reading an historical by Anne Herries. Another good one with suspense thrown in.

    Reply
  117. Hi, I just finished up Rowena Cherry’s book Forced MAte. It was quite good and now I am reading an historical by Anne Herries. Another good one with suspense thrown in.

    Reply
  118. Hi, I just finished up Rowena Cherry’s book Forced MAte. It was quite good and now I am reading an historical by Anne Herries. Another good one with suspense thrown in.

    Reply
  119. Hi, I just finished up Rowena Cherry’s book Forced MAte. It was quite good and now I am reading an historical by Anne Herries. Another good one with suspense thrown in.

    Reply
  120. Hi, I just finished up Rowena Cherry’s book Forced MAte. It was quite good and now I am reading an historical by Anne Herries. Another good one with suspense thrown in.

    Reply
  121. You could try a good murder mystery; I just finished the Stranger In Death by J.D Robb or the Darkness Chosen series (2 books so far) by Christina Dodd. If you are really in the mood for romance, I suggest anything by Stephanie Laurens. If you are looking for inspiration I would suggest any classics.(Such as Jane Austen or Louisa May Alcott, even some Shakespeare) Even if you have read them I still had to say so. Oh and I really love your novels. They are beautifully written!

    Reply
  122. You could try a good murder mystery; I just finished the Stranger In Death by J.D Robb or the Darkness Chosen series (2 books so far) by Christina Dodd. If you are really in the mood for romance, I suggest anything by Stephanie Laurens. If you are looking for inspiration I would suggest any classics.(Such as Jane Austen or Louisa May Alcott, even some Shakespeare) Even if you have read them I still had to say so. Oh and I really love your novels. They are beautifully written!

    Reply
  123. You could try a good murder mystery; I just finished the Stranger In Death by J.D Robb or the Darkness Chosen series (2 books so far) by Christina Dodd. If you are really in the mood for romance, I suggest anything by Stephanie Laurens. If you are looking for inspiration I would suggest any classics.(Such as Jane Austen or Louisa May Alcott, even some Shakespeare) Even if you have read them I still had to say so. Oh and I really love your novels. They are beautifully written!

    Reply
  124. You could try a good murder mystery; I just finished the Stranger In Death by J.D Robb or the Darkness Chosen series (2 books so far) by Christina Dodd. If you are really in the mood for romance, I suggest anything by Stephanie Laurens. If you are looking for inspiration I would suggest any classics.(Such as Jane Austen or Louisa May Alcott, even some Shakespeare) Even if you have read them I still had to say so. Oh and I really love your novels. They are beautifully written!

    Reply
  125. You could try a good murder mystery; I just finished the Stranger In Death by J.D Robb or the Darkness Chosen series (2 books so far) by Christina Dodd. If you are really in the mood for romance, I suggest anything by Stephanie Laurens. If you are looking for inspiration I would suggest any classics.(Such as Jane Austen or Louisa May Alcott, even some Shakespeare) Even if you have read them I still had to say so. Oh and I really love your novels. They are beautifully written!

    Reply
  126. great list! I’ll toss in ‘What’s So Funny?’ by Donald. E. Westlake, and ‘Thud!’ by Terry Pratchett. Two great doses of funny.

    Reply
  127. great list! I’ll toss in ‘What’s So Funny?’ by Donald. E. Westlake, and ‘Thud!’ by Terry Pratchett. Two great doses of funny.

    Reply
  128. great list! I’ll toss in ‘What’s So Funny?’ by Donald. E. Westlake, and ‘Thud!’ by Terry Pratchett. Two great doses of funny.

    Reply
  129. great list! I’ll toss in ‘What’s So Funny?’ by Donald. E. Westlake, and ‘Thud!’ by Terry Pratchett. Two great doses of funny.

    Reply
  130. great list! I’ll toss in ‘What’s So Funny?’ by Donald. E. Westlake, and ‘Thud!’ by Terry Pratchett. Two great doses of funny.

    Reply
  131. For me my comfort reads are Jenny Crusie’s “Welcome to Temptation”, Georgette Heyer’s “The Grand Sophy”, Loretta Chase’s “Lord of Scoundrels”, Jayne Ann Krentz’s “The Golden Chance”, Shanna Swendson’s “Enchanted Inc.” and Julie Garwood’s “The Secret”. I read each of these at least twice a year, sometimes more than that. In fact, I picked up Temptation today to read my favorite scene (when Sophie beats Phin at pool) and wound up finishing the book. It wouldn’t let go. 🙂
    I’d highly recommend all of these titles to any and everyone.

    Reply
  132. For me my comfort reads are Jenny Crusie’s “Welcome to Temptation”, Georgette Heyer’s “The Grand Sophy”, Loretta Chase’s “Lord of Scoundrels”, Jayne Ann Krentz’s “The Golden Chance”, Shanna Swendson’s “Enchanted Inc.” and Julie Garwood’s “The Secret”. I read each of these at least twice a year, sometimes more than that. In fact, I picked up Temptation today to read my favorite scene (when Sophie beats Phin at pool) and wound up finishing the book. It wouldn’t let go. 🙂
    I’d highly recommend all of these titles to any and everyone.

    Reply
  133. For me my comfort reads are Jenny Crusie’s “Welcome to Temptation”, Georgette Heyer’s “The Grand Sophy”, Loretta Chase’s “Lord of Scoundrels”, Jayne Ann Krentz’s “The Golden Chance”, Shanna Swendson’s “Enchanted Inc.” and Julie Garwood’s “The Secret”. I read each of these at least twice a year, sometimes more than that. In fact, I picked up Temptation today to read my favorite scene (when Sophie beats Phin at pool) and wound up finishing the book. It wouldn’t let go. 🙂
    I’d highly recommend all of these titles to any and everyone.

    Reply
  134. For me my comfort reads are Jenny Crusie’s “Welcome to Temptation”, Georgette Heyer’s “The Grand Sophy”, Loretta Chase’s “Lord of Scoundrels”, Jayne Ann Krentz’s “The Golden Chance”, Shanna Swendson’s “Enchanted Inc.” and Julie Garwood’s “The Secret”. I read each of these at least twice a year, sometimes more than that. In fact, I picked up Temptation today to read my favorite scene (when Sophie beats Phin at pool) and wound up finishing the book. It wouldn’t let go. 🙂
    I’d highly recommend all of these titles to any and everyone.

    Reply
  135. For me my comfort reads are Jenny Crusie’s “Welcome to Temptation”, Georgette Heyer’s “The Grand Sophy”, Loretta Chase’s “Lord of Scoundrels”, Jayne Ann Krentz’s “The Golden Chance”, Shanna Swendson’s “Enchanted Inc.” and Julie Garwood’s “The Secret”. I read each of these at least twice a year, sometimes more than that. In fact, I picked up Temptation today to read my favorite scene (when Sophie beats Phin at pool) and wound up finishing the book. It wouldn’t let go. 🙂
    I’d highly recommend all of these titles to any and everyone.

    Reply
  136. Just to be a little different, if you haven’t looked at Patricia Briggs’ Mercy Thompson series, then I recommend Moon Called, Blood Bound, and Iron Kissed.
    A series that started out strong is Laura Anne Gilman with Staying Dead and Curse the Dark. The two most recent have sort of floundered.
    A delightful traditional mystery series, set in the context of a long-running daytime soap opera, is by Linda Palmer, starting with Love is Murder.
    Charlaine Harris has stretched herself with Grave Sight, Grave Surprise, and An Ice Cold Grave.
    Carole Nelson Douglas has done a wonderful hybrid of her romance and detective selves, adding in paranormal and setting up a new series, in Dancing with Werewolves.
    In addition to Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan series, she has two others. The Curse of Chalion and Paladin of Souls are fantastic — wonderful worldbuilding with echoes of an Iberian peninsula at the time of Ferdinand and Isabella, but turned upside down and with a totally non-Christian polytheist religion she invented.
    The other new series by her includes Legacy and The Sharing Knife.

    Reply
  137. Just to be a little different, if you haven’t looked at Patricia Briggs’ Mercy Thompson series, then I recommend Moon Called, Blood Bound, and Iron Kissed.
    A series that started out strong is Laura Anne Gilman with Staying Dead and Curse the Dark. The two most recent have sort of floundered.
    A delightful traditional mystery series, set in the context of a long-running daytime soap opera, is by Linda Palmer, starting with Love is Murder.
    Charlaine Harris has stretched herself with Grave Sight, Grave Surprise, and An Ice Cold Grave.
    Carole Nelson Douglas has done a wonderful hybrid of her romance and detective selves, adding in paranormal and setting up a new series, in Dancing with Werewolves.
    In addition to Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan series, she has two others. The Curse of Chalion and Paladin of Souls are fantastic — wonderful worldbuilding with echoes of an Iberian peninsula at the time of Ferdinand and Isabella, but turned upside down and with a totally non-Christian polytheist religion she invented.
    The other new series by her includes Legacy and The Sharing Knife.

    Reply
  138. Just to be a little different, if you haven’t looked at Patricia Briggs’ Mercy Thompson series, then I recommend Moon Called, Blood Bound, and Iron Kissed.
    A series that started out strong is Laura Anne Gilman with Staying Dead and Curse the Dark. The two most recent have sort of floundered.
    A delightful traditional mystery series, set in the context of a long-running daytime soap opera, is by Linda Palmer, starting with Love is Murder.
    Charlaine Harris has stretched herself with Grave Sight, Grave Surprise, and An Ice Cold Grave.
    Carole Nelson Douglas has done a wonderful hybrid of her romance and detective selves, adding in paranormal and setting up a new series, in Dancing with Werewolves.
    In addition to Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan series, she has two others. The Curse of Chalion and Paladin of Souls are fantastic — wonderful worldbuilding with echoes of an Iberian peninsula at the time of Ferdinand and Isabella, but turned upside down and with a totally non-Christian polytheist religion she invented.
    The other new series by her includes Legacy and The Sharing Knife.

    Reply
  139. Just to be a little different, if you haven’t looked at Patricia Briggs’ Mercy Thompson series, then I recommend Moon Called, Blood Bound, and Iron Kissed.
    A series that started out strong is Laura Anne Gilman with Staying Dead and Curse the Dark. The two most recent have sort of floundered.
    A delightful traditional mystery series, set in the context of a long-running daytime soap opera, is by Linda Palmer, starting with Love is Murder.
    Charlaine Harris has stretched herself with Grave Sight, Grave Surprise, and An Ice Cold Grave.
    Carole Nelson Douglas has done a wonderful hybrid of her romance and detective selves, adding in paranormal and setting up a new series, in Dancing with Werewolves.
    In addition to Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan series, she has two others. The Curse of Chalion and Paladin of Souls are fantastic — wonderful worldbuilding with echoes of an Iberian peninsula at the time of Ferdinand and Isabella, but turned upside down and with a totally non-Christian polytheist religion she invented.
    The other new series by her includes Legacy and The Sharing Knife.

    Reply
  140. Just to be a little different, if you haven’t looked at Patricia Briggs’ Mercy Thompson series, then I recommend Moon Called, Blood Bound, and Iron Kissed.
    A series that started out strong is Laura Anne Gilman with Staying Dead and Curse the Dark. The two most recent have sort of floundered.
    A delightful traditional mystery series, set in the context of a long-running daytime soap opera, is by Linda Palmer, starting with Love is Murder.
    Charlaine Harris has stretched herself with Grave Sight, Grave Surprise, and An Ice Cold Grave.
    Carole Nelson Douglas has done a wonderful hybrid of her romance and detective selves, adding in paranormal and setting up a new series, in Dancing with Werewolves.
    In addition to Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan series, she has two others. The Curse of Chalion and Paladin of Souls are fantastic — wonderful worldbuilding with echoes of an Iberian peninsula at the time of Ferdinand and Isabella, but turned upside down and with a totally non-Christian polytheist religion she invented.
    The other new series by her includes Legacy and The Sharing Knife.

    Reply
  141. For something a little grittier, Illona Haus — Blue Valor, Blue Justice, and Blue Mercy.
    They are police procedurals set in Baltimore. The h/h are mature and do not have an easy relationship.

    Reply
  142. For something a little grittier, Illona Haus — Blue Valor, Blue Justice, and Blue Mercy.
    They are police procedurals set in Baltimore. The h/h are mature and do not have an easy relationship.

    Reply
  143. For something a little grittier, Illona Haus — Blue Valor, Blue Justice, and Blue Mercy.
    They are police procedurals set in Baltimore. The h/h are mature and do not have an easy relationship.

    Reply
  144. For something a little grittier, Illona Haus — Blue Valor, Blue Justice, and Blue Mercy.
    They are police procedurals set in Baltimore. The h/h are mature and do not have an easy relationship.

    Reply
  145. For something a little grittier, Illona Haus — Blue Valor, Blue Justice, and Blue Mercy.
    They are police procedurals set in Baltimore. The h/h are mature and do not have an easy relationship.

    Reply
  146. WHEN DEMONS WALK is my favorite Patricia Briggs book. The heroine is a mage and thief impersonating a courtesan to solve a series of supernatural murders. Great h/h interplay.

    Reply
  147. WHEN DEMONS WALK is my favorite Patricia Briggs book. The heroine is a mage and thief impersonating a courtesan to solve a series of supernatural murders. Great h/h interplay.

    Reply
  148. WHEN DEMONS WALK is my favorite Patricia Briggs book. The heroine is a mage and thief impersonating a courtesan to solve a series of supernatural murders. Great h/h interplay.

    Reply
  149. WHEN DEMONS WALK is my favorite Patricia Briggs book. The heroine is a mage and thief impersonating a courtesan to solve a series of supernatural murders. Great h/h interplay.

    Reply
  150. WHEN DEMONS WALK is my favorite Patricia Briggs book. The heroine is a mage and thief impersonating a courtesan to solve a series of supernatural murders. Great h/h interplay.

    Reply
  151. I loved, loved. LOVED The Spymaster’s Lady. Recently I’ve also fallen for Meljean Brook’s Guardian series (Demon Angel, Demon Moon, Demon Night) and Susan Elizabeth Phillips’ Chicago Stars books, especially This Heart of Mine. I’ve been trying to find a list of the best secret baby romance novels of all time, but I don’t know if one exists. I seem to go through phases in my reading choices, and right now I have babies on the brain.

    Reply
  152. I loved, loved. LOVED The Spymaster’s Lady. Recently I’ve also fallen for Meljean Brook’s Guardian series (Demon Angel, Demon Moon, Demon Night) and Susan Elizabeth Phillips’ Chicago Stars books, especially This Heart of Mine. I’ve been trying to find a list of the best secret baby romance novels of all time, but I don’t know if one exists. I seem to go through phases in my reading choices, and right now I have babies on the brain.

    Reply
  153. I loved, loved. LOVED The Spymaster’s Lady. Recently I’ve also fallen for Meljean Brook’s Guardian series (Demon Angel, Demon Moon, Demon Night) and Susan Elizabeth Phillips’ Chicago Stars books, especially This Heart of Mine. I’ve been trying to find a list of the best secret baby romance novels of all time, but I don’t know if one exists. I seem to go through phases in my reading choices, and right now I have babies on the brain.

    Reply
  154. I loved, loved. LOVED The Spymaster’s Lady. Recently I’ve also fallen for Meljean Brook’s Guardian series (Demon Angel, Demon Moon, Demon Night) and Susan Elizabeth Phillips’ Chicago Stars books, especially This Heart of Mine. I’ve been trying to find a list of the best secret baby romance novels of all time, but I don’t know if one exists. I seem to go through phases in my reading choices, and right now I have babies on the brain.

    Reply
  155. I loved, loved. LOVED The Spymaster’s Lady. Recently I’ve also fallen for Meljean Brook’s Guardian series (Demon Angel, Demon Moon, Demon Night) and Susan Elizabeth Phillips’ Chicago Stars books, especially This Heart of Mine. I’ve been trying to find a list of the best secret baby romance novels of all time, but I don’t know if one exists. I seem to go through phases in my reading choices, and right now I have babies on the brain.

    Reply
  156. Since the above I’ve read Silent in the Grave by Deanna Raybourn, which I believe someone else mentioned, and I found myself really caught up in despite all the Victorian doom & gloom. I have now started the Sebastian St. Cyr series of regency mysteries by C. S. Harris; I’m aware that there are historical errors in them but it has the one irreplaceable quality in a leisure book: it’s holding my interest. I have read so many romances that I think I’m actually getting tired of them, and a slightly different focus is welcome.

    Reply
  157. Since the above I’ve read Silent in the Grave by Deanna Raybourn, which I believe someone else mentioned, and I found myself really caught up in despite all the Victorian doom & gloom. I have now started the Sebastian St. Cyr series of regency mysteries by C. S. Harris; I’m aware that there are historical errors in them but it has the one irreplaceable quality in a leisure book: it’s holding my interest. I have read so many romances that I think I’m actually getting tired of them, and a slightly different focus is welcome.

    Reply
  158. Since the above I’ve read Silent in the Grave by Deanna Raybourn, which I believe someone else mentioned, and I found myself really caught up in despite all the Victorian doom & gloom. I have now started the Sebastian St. Cyr series of regency mysteries by C. S. Harris; I’m aware that there are historical errors in them but it has the one irreplaceable quality in a leisure book: it’s holding my interest. I have read so many romances that I think I’m actually getting tired of them, and a slightly different focus is welcome.

    Reply
  159. Since the above I’ve read Silent in the Grave by Deanna Raybourn, which I believe someone else mentioned, and I found myself really caught up in despite all the Victorian doom & gloom. I have now started the Sebastian St. Cyr series of regency mysteries by C. S. Harris; I’m aware that there are historical errors in them but it has the one irreplaceable quality in a leisure book: it’s holding my interest. I have read so many romances that I think I’m actually getting tired of them, and a slightly different focus is welcome.

    Reply
  160. Since the above I’ve read Silent in the Grave by Deanna Raybourn, which I believe someone else mentioned, and I found myself really caught up in despite all the Victorian doom & gloom. I have now started the Sebastian St. Cyr series of regency mysteries by C. S. Harris; I’m aware that there are historical errors in them but it has the one irreplaceable quality in a leisure book: it’s holding my interest. I have read so many romances that I think I’m actually getting tired of them, and a slightly different focus is welcome.

    Reply

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