A Quiet Evening In

Anne here. I'm heading towards a looming deadline, and so instead of a learned blog, I'm going to play a little game of let's pretend.

Fire-placeIt's a cold, wet Regency-era English evening. You're staying in for the night. There's no assembly to attend, no party, no play or concert or any other entertainment provided. You'll have to entertain yourself. Rain is spattering on the windows, and there's wind whistling through the chimneys, but inside the lanterns are lit and a cosy fire is crackling. Nevertheless, a long evening stretches before you. What are you going to do?

Reading?
What would you read? A witty Jane Austen novel, a dramatic tale by Mrs Radcliffe , Sir Walter Scott, an improving tale by Maria Edgeworth, a scary one by "Monk" Lewis or Wilkie Collins, or is poetry your choice tonight? Shelley? Byron's latest, or some classic Shakespeare?

Writing?
Or will you be quietly penning your own tale, or perhaps a letter? AustenQuilt

Handicrafts?
Sewing? Would you be doing fine embroidery, or sewing a garment, perhaps? Or maybe you'd be sewing a patchwork quilt like this one Jane Austen and her sister and mother sewed.

Knitting, tatting or knotting?
Or maybe you're a knitter, making mittens, or caps, or a warm woolen scarf or muffler. Or bootees or slippers or socks, perhaps. Or are you a tatter making pretty lace borders. Or a knotter. You might do hairwork, braiding and curling the hair of a loved one (or your own hair, or even your dog's hair) into jewellery or using it to create some kind of picturesque scene.

Paperscrolltcaddy1bWorking with paper
Perhaps you will pass the evening filigree work (paper quilling) or "Japanning" (papier-mΓ’chΓ©.) Both were very popular crafts for ladies in this period. Here's a box entirely decorated with paper filigree and varnished.

Maybe you have artistic leanings and will work on a painting or a drawing, and will sketch your companions as they read or sew. Or perhaps you prefer to sketch your dog or cat. Or does shell work, or feather work or straw work appeals to you more, decorating with, or making pictures and figures from them.

What about paper collage? Mary Delany was noted for her botanical collages.

Would you play music?
Gather around the piano for a happy group singalong?
Play an instrument for the listening pleasure of your companions?
Or just quietly hum to yourself?

Or are you more in the mood to play games? PlayingCards
There were lots of indoor games played in the Regency.
Word games abounded, charades, twenty questions, I spy, and Proverbs.

Card games, many of which are still played today, such as whist, vingt-et-un twenty-one or pontoon), piquet, and others we're not so familiar with, such as commerce or loo.

Then there are board games like Fox and Geese, solitaire, chess, and draughts (checkers), children's games like spillikins (or jackstraws or pick-up sticks) were still popular with adults.
And of course there are noisy group games such as charades or blind man's buff.  

Supper time
Around ten o'clock, you'll probably be wanting supper. Your last meal was probably around 4pm (unless you live in Town) so you'll be hungry. 
What are you going to eat and drink?
ToastingFireWill it be a casual nursery-type supper, toasting bread over the fire with a long toasting fork, or maybe toasting crumpets and spreading them with butter and honey or jam?

Or will it be something more elegant, like a cup of tea or a glass of wine. And supper set out on a tray, with some sliced cold chicken and ham, a few sandwiches or plain bread and butter, some cakes, cheese and dry biscuits(crackers) fruit or jam tarts, a salad, jelly, almond bread, maybe a biscuit (cookie) or two. It's up to you.

So there you have it. Your task, should you choose to accept it, is to describe how you will pass your evening — what you will do, with whom (real or imaginary) and what will you have for supper? I'll choose two commenters to win a copy of my upcoming book, THE SUMMER BRIDE.  **Note: Two winners have now been selected β€” Christina, and Karen, and I've emailed them. Thank you all for joinng in the conversation. It's been delightful and I feel so rested with all these lovely quiet evenings in. Anne.

325 thoughts on “A Quiet Evening In”

  1. Oh, so much fun to choose from!
    I’m not a crafty or artsy sort, so I’d refrain from those activities. Word games are always fun, and I am a fan of twenty questions. My sister and I are somewhat musical (she was always more talented than I), so an evening of piano might be in store. Most likely we would combine the two and try to guess the piece of music being played! Mom was always good at naming music and composers. It’d be a family affair. Though Dad would be reading the paper or something boring like that. πŸ˜‰
    Since we’re relaxed, dinner should be as well. Trays of cold meats, along with cheeses, jam and some nuts would be what we’d choose from. And wine to make it a more festive evening. Perhaps some fruit or cakes and tea for dessert.
    Oddly enough, it sounds like the kind of night my close friends and I have when we get together. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  2. Oh, so much fun to choose from!
    I’m not a crafty or artsy sort, so I’d refrain from those activities. Word games are always fun, and I am a fan of twenty questions. My sister and I are somewhat musical (she was always more talented than I), so an evening of piano might be in store. Most likely we would combine the two and try to guess the piece of music being played! Mom was always good at naming music and composers. It’d be a family affair. Though Dad would be reading the paper or something boring like that. πŸ˜‰
    Since we’re relaxed, dinner should be as well. Trays of cold meats, along with cheeses, jam and some nuts would be what we’d choose from. And wine to make it a more festive evening. Perhaps some fruit or cakes and tea for dessert.
    Oddly enough, it sounds like the kind of night my close friends and I have when we get together. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  3. Oh, so much fun to choose from!
    I’m not a crafty or artsy sort, so I’d refrain from those activities. Word games are always fun, and I am a fan of twenty questions. My sister and I are somewhat musical (she was always more talented than I), so an evening of piano might be in store. Most likely we would combine the two and try to guess the piece of music being played! Mom was always good at naming music and composers. It’d be a family affair. Though Dad would be reading the paper or something boring like that. πŸ˜‰
    Since we’re relaxed, dinner should be as well. Trays of cold meats, along with cheeses, jam and some nuts would be what we’d choose from. And wine to make it a more festive evening. Perhaps some fruit or cakes and tea for dessert.
    Oddly enough, it sounds like the kind of night my close friends and I have when we get together. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  4. Oh, so much fun to choose from!
    I’m not a crafty or artsy sort, so I’d refrain from those activities. Word games are always fun, and I am a fan of twenty questions. My sister and I are somewhat musical (she was always more talented than I), so an evening of piano might be in store. Most likely we would combine the two and try to guess the piece of music being played! Mom was always good at naming music and composers. It’d be a family affair. Though Dad would be reading the paper or something boring like that. πŸ˜‰
    Since we’re relaxed, dinner should be as well. Trays of cold meats, along with cheeses, jam and some nuts would be what we’d choose from. And wine to make it a more festive evening. Perhaps some fruit or cakes and tea for dessert.
    Oddly enough, it sounds like the kind of night my close friends and I have when we get together. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  5. Oh, so much fun to choose from!
    I’m not a crafty or artsy sort, so I’d refrain from those activities. Word games are always fun, and I am a fan of twenty questions. My sister and I are somewhat musical (she was always more talented than I), so an evening of piano might be in store. Most likely we would combine the two and try to guess the piece of music being played! Mom was always good at naming music and composers. It’d be a family affair. Though Dad would be reading the paper or something boring like that. πŸ˜‰
    Since we’re relaxed, dinner should be as well. Trays of cold meats, along with cheeses, jam and some nuts would be what we’d choose from. And wine to make it a more festive evening. Perhaps some fruit or cakes and tea for dessert.
    Oddly enough, it sounds like the kind of night my close friends and I have when we get together. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  6. In front of a fireplace, a good book by one of the word wenches, my dog by my chaise and a cup of tea. AHHHHHHHH’

    Reply
  7. In front of a fireplace, a good book by one of the word wenches, my dog by my chaise and a cup of tea. AHHHHHHHH’

    Reply
  8. In front of a fireplace, a good book by one of the word wenches, my dog by my chaise and a cup of tea. AHHHHHHHH’

    Reply
  9. In front of a fireplace, a good book by one of the word wenches, my dog by my chaise and a cup of tea. AHHHHHHHH’

    Reply
  10. In front of a fireplace, a good book by one of the word wenches, my dog by my chaise and a cup of tea. AHHHHHHHH’

    Reply
  11. Hmmm, interesting question. I think I would play cards with my husband, then have a cozy dinner of crumpets by the fire. Later, we would retire (need I elaborate?) I love the sound of rain pattering on the roof.

    Reply
  12. Hmmm, interesting question. I think I would play cards with my husband, then have a cozy dinner of crumpets by the fire. Later, we would retire (need I elaborate?) I love the sound of rain pattering on the roof.

    Reply
  13. Hmmm, interesting question. I think I would play cards with my husband, then have a cozy dinner of crumpets by the fire. Later, we would retire (need I elaborate?) I love the sound of rain pattering on the roof.

    Reply
  14. Hmmm, interesting question. I think I would play cards with my husband, then have a cozy dinner of crumpets by the fire. Later, we would retire (need I elaborate?) I love the sound of rain pattering on the roof.

    Reply
  15. Hmmm, interesting question. I think I would play cards with my husband, then have a cozy dinner of crumpets by the fire. Later, we would retire (need I elaborate?) I love the sound of rain pattering on the roof.

    Reply
  16. Well, this sounds like life out on the farm in the 1950s. I had two great uncles and a great aunt (siblings) who had a farm. They were like grandparents to me. Spent quite a few of my summer days there. Although TVs were around by then, they would’t own one for another 15 years. They did have radio, but seldom listened to it in the evening.
    Evenings were spent talking (about anything and everything) card games (pinochle) or dominoes. I preferred embroidery or reading or sitting on the porch watching the fireflies or (in August) meteor showers.
    My mothers family was different. She came from a large family (14 children). There evenings were spent singing during her youth in the 20s and 30s. Everytime there was a family reunion, out came whatever instruments they had and the singing started. I LOVED it.
    I don’t know about the meal at 10:00 thing. We might have a light snack … but no meal.

    Reply
  17. Well, this sounds like life out on the farm in the 1950s. I had two great uncles and a great aunt (siblings) who had a farm. They were like grandparents to me. Spent quite a few of my summer days there. Although TVs were around by then, they would’t own one for another 15 years. They did have radio, but seldom listened to it in the evening.
    Evenings were spent talking (about anything and everything) card games (pinochle) or dominoes. I preferred embroidery or reading or sitting on the porch watching the fireflies or (in August) meteor showers.
    My mothers family was different. She came from a large family (14 children). There evenings were spent singing during her youth in the 20s and 30s. Everytime there was a family reunion, out came whatever instruments they had and the singing started. I LOVED it.
    I don’t know about the meal at 10:00 thing. We might have a light snack … but no meal.

    Reply
  18. Well, this sounds like life out on the farm in the 1950s. I had two great uncles and a great aunt (siblings) who had a farm. They were like grandparents to me. Spent quite a few of my summer days there. Although TVs were around by then, they would’t own one for another 15 years. They did have radio, but seldom listened to it in the evening.
    Evenings were spent talking (about anything and everything) card games (pinochle) or dominoes. I preferred embroidery or reading or sitting on the porch watching the fireflies or (in August) meteor showers.
    My mothers family was different. She came from a large family (14 children). There evenings were spent singing during her youth in the 20s and 30s. Everytime there was a family reunion, out came whatever instruments they had and the singing started. I LOVED it.
    I don’t know about the meal at 10:00 thing. We might have a light snack … but no meal.

    Reply
  19. Well, this sounds like life out on the farm in the 1950s. I had two great uncles and a great aunt (siblings) who had a farm. They were like grandparents to me. Spent quite a few of my summer days there. Although TVs were around by then, they would’t own one for another 15 years. They did have radio, but seldom listened to it in the evening.
    Evenings were spent talking (about anything and everything) card games (pinochle) or dominoes. I preferred embroidery or reading or sitting on the porch watching the fireflies or (in August) meteor showers.
    My mothers family was different. She came from a large family (14 children). There evenings were spent singing during her youth in the 20s and 30s. Everytime there was a family reunion, out came whatever instruments they had and the singing started. I LOVED it.
    I don’t know about the meal at 10:00 thing. We might have a light snack … but no meal.

    Reply
  20. Well, this sounds like life out on the farm in the 1950s. I had two great uncles and a great aunt (siblings) who had a farm. They were like grandparents to me. Spent quite a few of my summer days there. Although TVs were around by then, they would’t own one for another 15 years. They did have radio, but seldom listened to it in the evening.
    Evenings were spent talking (about anything and everything) card games (pinochle) or dominoes. I preferred embroidery or reading or sitting on the porch watching the fireflies or (in August) meteor showers.
    My mothers family was different. She came from a large family (14 children). There evenings were spent singing during her youth in the 20s and 30s. Everytime there was a family reunion, out came whatever instruments they had and the singing started. I LOVED it.
    I don’t know about the meal at 10:00 thing. We might have a light snack … but no meal.

    Reply
  21. Right now my sister Edwina and I are warm and comfortable in front of our glowing fire and listening to a cold wind dragging tree branches across the window. I had bought a beautiful piece of material and now sat fashioning it into a purse to hang on Edwina’s wrist. She was sitting on the floor, drowsily staring into the fire and smoothing her hand over her dog Major’s furry head. We had requested a light meal – a creamy soup, some slices of a favourite quiche and just a few small tarts for dessert. Sheer contentment. What could be better on a chilly winter’s evening?

    Reply
  22. Right now my sister Edwina and I are warm and comfortable in front of our glowing fire and listening to a cold wind dragging tree branches across the window. I had bought a beautiful piece of material and now sat fashioning it into a purse to hang on Edwina’s wrist. She was sitting on the floor, drowsily staring into the fire and smoothing her hand over her dog Major’s furry head. We had requested a light meal – a creamy soup, some slices of a favourite quiche and just a few small tarts for dessert. Sheer contentment. What could be better on a chilly winter’s evening?

    Reply
  23. Right now my sister Edwina and I are warm and comfortable in front of our glowing fire and listening to a cold wind dragging tree branches across the window. I had bought a beautiful piece of material and now sat fashioning it into a purse to hang on Edwina’s wrist. She was sitting on the floor, drowsily staring into the fire and smoothing her hand over her dog Major’s furry head. We had requested a light meal – a creamy soup, some slices of a favourite quiche and just a few small tarts for dessert. Sheer contentment. What could be better on a chilly winter’s evening?

    Reply
  24. Right now my sister Edwina and I are warm and comfortable in front of our glowing fire and listening to a cold wind dragging tree branches across the window. I had bought a beautiful piece of material and now sat fashioning it into a purse to hang on Edwina’s wrist. She was sitting on the floor, drowsily staring into the fire and smoothing her hand over her dog Major’s furry head. We had requested a light meal – a creamy soup, some slices of a favourite quiche and just a few small tarts for dessert. Sheer contentment. What could be better on a chilly winter’s evening?

    Reply
  25. Right now my sister Edwina and I are warm and comfortable in front of our glowing fire and listening to a cold wind dragging tree branches across the window. I had bought a beautiful piece of material and now sat fashioning it into a purse to hang on Edwina’s wrist. She was sitting on the floor, drowsily staring into the fire and smoothing her hand over her dog Major’s furry head. We had requested a light meal – a creamy soup, some slices of a favourite quiche and just a few small tarts for dessert. Sheer contentment. What could be better on a chilly winter’s evening?

    Reply
  26. Luckily, we have some intimate friends of my sister and myself staying with us for a few days, so at least there will be congenial company and lively conversation. My husband has escaped to his library and will enjoy a glass or two of port while dozing in his favourite wing chair in front of the fire. His dogs will bake themselves comfortably on the hearth next to him. Meanwhile, in the cozy sitting room with our own glowing blaze warming us, we woman will entertain one another with delicious gossip about mutual acquaintances and the less likeable members of our families. I might half-heartedly stab at my embroidery, and my sister will most likely tinkle a country tune on the pianoforte. I’m sure Maria and Sophie will take it in turns to read to us – Byron’s new poem – they are vastly affected by his sensibility. At nine o’clock, Mrs Cuttle will bring in the tea tray, which will be very welcome. And then to bed.

    Reply
  27. Luckily, we have some intimate friends of my sister and myself staying with us for a few days, so at least there will be congenial company and lively conversation. My husband has escaped to his library and will enjoy a glass or two of port while dozing in his favourite wing chair in front of the fire. His dogs will bake themselves comfortably on the hearth next to him. Meanwhile, in the cozy sitting room with our own glowing blaze warming us, we woman will entertain one another with delicious gossip about mutual acquaintances and the less likeable members of our families. I might half-heartedly stab at my embroidery, and my sister will most likely tinkle a country tune on the pianoforte. I’m sure Maria and Sophie will take it in turns to read to us – Byron’s new poem – they are vastly affected by his sensibility. At nine o’clock, Mrs Cuttle will bring in the tea tray, which will be very welcome. And then to bed.

    Reply
  28. Luckily, we have some intimate friends of my sister and myself staying with us for a few days, so at least there will be congenial company and lively conversation. My husband has escaped to his library and will enjoy a glass or two of port while dozing in his favourite wing chair in front of the fire. His dogs will bake themselves comfortably on the hearth next to him. Meanwhile, in the cozy sitting room with our own glowing blaze warming us, we woman will entertain one another with delicious gossip about mutual acquaintances and the less likeable members of our families. I might half-heartedly stab at my embroidery, and my sister will most likely tinkle a country tune on the pianoforte. I’m sure Maria and Sophie will take it in turns to read to us – Byron’s new poem – they are vastly affected by his sensibility. At nine o’clock, Mrs Cuttle will bring in the tea tray, which will be very welcome. And then to bed.

    Reply
  29. Luckily, we have some intimate friends of my sister and myself staying with us for a few days, so at least there will be congenial company and lively conversation. My husband has escaped to his library and will enjoy a glass or two of port while dozing in his favourite wing chair in front of the fire. His dogs will bake themselves comfortably on the hearth next to him. Meanwhile, in the cozy sitting room with our own glowing blaze warming us, we woman will entertain one another with delicious gossip about mutual acquaintances and the less likeable members of our families. I might half-heartedly stab at my embroidery, and my sister will most likely tinkle a country tune on the pianoforte. I’m sure Maria and Sophie will take it in turns to read to us – Byron’s new poem – they are vastly affected by his sensibility. At nine o’clock, Mrs Cuttle will bring in the tea tray, which will be very welcome. And then to bed.

    Reply
  30. Luckily, we have some intimate friends of my sister and myself staying with us for a few days, so at least there will be congenial company and lively conversation. My husband has escaped to his library and will enjoy a glass or two of port while dozing in his favourite wing chair in front of the fire. His dogs will bake themselves comfortably on the hearth next to him. Meanwhile, in the cozy sitting room with our own glowing blaze warming us, we woman will entertain one another with delicious gossip about mutual acquaintances and the less likeable members of our families. I might half-heartedly stab at my embroidery, and my sister will most likely tinkle a country tune on the pianoforte. I’m sure Maria and Sophie will take it in turns to read to us – Byron’s new poem – they are vastly affected by his sensibility. At nine o’clock, Mrs Cuttle will bring in the tea tray, which will be very welcome. And then to bed.

    Reply
  31. I think not even the Regency era would prevent me from being the Farrah Fixit of the family, so I would no doubt be attempting to repair something — a book with its pages falling out, the buckle on my husband’s shoe, the broken clasp on my sister’s pearl brooch. I probably wouldn’t swear while doing it, however.
    My husband would be sitting by the fire rereading Pride and Prejudice for what must be the thirty-fifth time and occasionally quoting clever passages aloud to us. (In our circle of family and friends, he holds the all-time record for most viewings of the ’95 Firth/Ehle.)

    Reply
  32. I think not even the Regency era would prevent me from being the Farrah Fixit of the family, so I would no doubt be attempting to repair something — a book with its pages falling out, the buckle on my husband’s shoe, the broken clasp on my sister’s pearl brooch. I probably wouldn’t swear while doing it, however.
    My husband would be sitting by the fire rereading Pride and Prejudice for what must be the thirty-fifth time and occasionally quoting clever passages aloud to us. (In our circle of family and friends, he holds the all-time record for most viewings of the ’95 Firth/Ehle.)

    Reply
  33. I think not even the Regency era would prevent me from being the Farrah Fixit of the family, so I would no doubt be attempting to repair something — a book with its pages falling out, the buckle on my husband’s shoe, the broken clasp on my sister’s pearl brooch. I probably wouldn’t swear while doing it, however.
    My husband would be sitting by the fire rereading Pride and Prejudice for what must be the thirty-fifth time and occasionally quoting clever passages aloud to us. (In our circle of family and friends, he holds the all-time record for most viewings of the ’95 Firth/Ehle.)

    Reply
  34. I think not even the Regency era would prevent me from being the Farrah Fixit of the family, so I would no doubt be attempting to repair something — a book with its pages falling out, the buckle on my husband’s shoe, the broken clasp on my sister’s pearl brooch. I probably wouldn’t swear while doing it, however.
    My husband would be sitting by the fire rereading Pride and Prejudice for what must be the thirty-fifth time and occasionally quoting clever passages aloud to us. (In our circle of family and friends, he holds the all-time record for most viewings of the ’95 Firth/Ehle.)

    Reply
  35. I think not even the Regency era would prevent me from being the Farrah Fixit of the family, so I would no doubt be attempting to repair something — a book with its pages falling out, the buckle on my husband’s shoe, the broken clasp on my sister’s pearl brooch. I probably wouldn’t swear while doing it, however.
    My husband would be sitting by the fire rereading Pride and Prejudice for what must be the thirty-fifth time and occasionally quoting clever passages aloud to us. (In our circle of family and friends, he holds the all-time record for most viewings of the ’95 Firth/Ehle.)

    Reply
  36. I would be knitting and also some paiting (oil) but there are really so many fun choices. People today don’t know or remember all the fun things we can do without needing tv or internet. It is good to remember that we have many choices.

    Reply
  37. I would be knitting and also some paiting (oil) but there are really so many fun choices. People today don’t know or remember all the fun things we can do without needing tv or internet. It is good to remember that we have many choices.

    Reply
  38. I would be knitting and also some paiting (oil) but there are really so many fun choices. People today don’t know or remember all the fun things we can do without needing tv or internet. It is good to remember that we have many choices.

    Reply
  39. I would be knitting and also some paiting (oil) but there are really so many fun choices. People today don’t know or remember all the fun things we can do without needing tv or internet. It is good to remember that we have many choices.

    Reply
  40. I would be knitting and also some paiting (oil) but there are really so many fun choices. People today don’t know or remember all the fun things we can do without needing tv or internet. It is good to remember that we have many choices.

    Reply
  41. definitely card games like speculation or Loo with who ever is in the house and a few glasses of warm mulled wine or warm mead to make it more fun and at 10pm something sweet like banburys, boiled fruit cake, baby thumbprint shortbreads with the last of the summer raspberry jam and of course a samovar of lady grey tea, then back to cards and some cognac….dogs in front of the fire of course

    Reply
  42. definitely card games like speculation or Loo with who ever is in the house and a few glasses of warm mulled wine or warm mead to make it more fun and at 10pm something sweet like banburys, boiled fruit cake, baby thumbprint shortbreads with the last of the summer raspberry jam and of course a samovar of lady grey tea, then back to cards and some cognac….dogs in front of the fire of course

    Reply
  43. definitely card games like speculation or Loo with who ever is in the house and a few glasses of warm mulled wine or warm mead to make it more fun and at 10pm something sweet like banburys, boiled fruit cake, baby thumbprint shortbreads with the last of the summer raspberry jam and of course a samovar of lady grey tea, then back to cards and some cognac….dogs in front of the fire of course

    Reply
  44. definitely card games like speculation or Loo with who ever is in the house and a few glasses of warm mulled wine or warm mead to make it more fun and at 10pm something sweet like banburys, boiled fruit cake, baby thumbprint shortbreads with the last of the summer raspberry jam and of course a samovar of lady grey tea, then back to cards and some cognac….dogs in front of the fire of course

    Reply
  45. definitely card games like speculation or Loo with who ever is in the house and a few glasses of warm mulled wine or warm mead to make it more fun and at 10pm something sweet like banburys, boiled fruit cake, baby thumbprint shortbreads with the last of the summer raspberry jam and of course a samovar of lady grey tea, then back to cards and some cognac….dogs in front of the fire of course

    Reply
  46. Break out the cards. I want a cut-throat game of whist. It may go on into the wee small hours of the morning while the players sip a few glasses of wine (I’ll be careful to sip less than the other players) and nibble on some sandwiches. This is how I supplement my pin money.

    Reply
  47. Break out the cards. I want a cut-throat game of whist. It may go on into the wee small hours of the morning while the players sip a few glasses of wine (I’ll be careful to sip less than the other players) and nibble on some sandwiches. This is how I supplement my pin money.

    Reply
  48. Break out the cards. I want a cut-throat game of whist. It may go on into the wee small hours of the morning while the players sip a few glasses of wine (I’ll be careful to sip less than the other players) and nibble on some sandwiches. This is how I supplement my pin money.

    Reply
  49. Break out the cards. I want a cut-throat game of whist. It may go on into the wee small hours of the morning while the players sip a few glasses of wine (I’ll be careful to sip less than the other players) and nibble on some sandwiches. This is how I supplement my pin money.

    Reply
  50. Break out the cards. I want a cut-throat game of whist. It may go on into the wee small hours of the morning while the players sip a few glasses of wine (I’ll be careful to sip less than the other players) and nibble on some sandwiches. This is how I supplement my pin money.

    Reply
  51. I haven’t indulged in cross stitch in an age. Quilting is another long neglected hobby. If I’ve no company, then I’d more likely be reading the latest Jane Austen or rereading a favorite. No doubt some idea would pop into my head, and I’d write for a while. If I’d company, I enjoy good conversation about what’s going on in the world, working through personal struggles. Scones with butter and jam, hot chocolate, cheese. Mmmmmm… now I’m hungry.

    Reply
  52. I haven’t indulged in cross stitch in an age. Quilting is another long neglected hobby. If I’ve no company, then I’d more likely be reading the latest Jane Austen or rereading a favorite. No doubt some idea would pop into my head, and I’d write for a while. If I’d company, I enjoy good conversation about what’s going on in the world, working through personal struggles. Scones with butter and jam, hot chocolate, cheese. Mmmmmm… now I’m hungry.

    Reply
  53. I haven’t indulged in cross stitch in an age. Quilting is another long neglected hobby. If I’ve no company, then I’d more likely be reading the latest Jane Austen or rereading a favorite. No doubt some idea would pop into my head, and I’d write for a while. If I’d company, I enjoy good conversation about what’s going on in the world, working through personal struggles. Scones with butter and jam, hot chocolate, cheese. Mmmmmm… now I’m hungry.

    Reply
  54. I haven’t indulged in cross stitch in an age. Quilting is another long neglected hobby. If I’ve no company, then I’d more likely be reading the latest Jane Austen or rereading a favorite. No doubt some idea would pop into my head, and I’d write for a while. If I’d company, I enjoy good conversation about what’s going on in the world, working through personal struggles. Scones with butter and jam, hot chocolate, cheese. Mmmmmm… now I’m hungry.

    Reply
  55. I haven’t indulged in cross stitch in an age. Quilting is another long neglected hobby. If I’ve no company, then I’d more likely be reading the latest Jane Austen or rereading a favorite. No doubt some idea would pop into my head, and I’d write for a while. If I’d company, I enjoy good conversation about what’s going on in the world, working through personal struggles. Scones with butter and jam, hot chocolate, cheese. Mmmmmm… now I’m hungry.

    Reply
  56. A spirited game of charades followed by a cold supper consisting of chicken and ham and perhaps cold cucumber soup and some apple or quince tartlets would be delightful.

    Reply
  57. A spirited game of charades followed by a cold supper consisting of chicken and ham and perhaps cold cucumber soup and some apple or quince tartlets would be delightful.

    Reply
  58. A spirited game of charades followed by a cold supper consisting of chicken and ham and perhaps cold cucumber soup and some apple or quince tartlets would be delightful.

    Reply
  59. A spirited game of charades followed by a cold supper consisting of chicken and ham and perhaps cold cucumber soup and some apple or quince tartlets would be delightful.

    Reply
  60. A spirited game of charades followed by a cold supper consisting of chicken and ham and perhaps cold cucumber soup and some apple or quince tartlets would be delightful.

    Reply
  61. I’m reading in front of the fire. Or, and here I’ll have to do some research, I’m working on a crossword puzzle and annoying my husband as I ask for help with spelling. I don’t feel too bad because he reads much faster than I do. I, however, remember the details and the words!

    Reply
  62. I’m reading in front of the fire. Or, and here I’ll have to do some research, I’m working on a crossword puzzle and annoying my husband as I ask for help with spelling. I don’t feel too bad because he reads much faster than I do. I, however, remember the details and the words!

    Reply
  63. I’m reading in front of the fire. Or, and here I’ll have to do some research, I’m working on a crossword puzzle and annoying my husband as I ask for help with spelling. I don’t feel too bad because he reads much faster than I do. I, however, remember the details and the words!

    Reply
  64. I’m reading in front of the fire. Or, and here I’ll have to do some research, I’m working on a crossword puzzle and annoying my husband as I ask for help with spelling. I don’t feel too bad because he reads much faster than I do. I, however, remember the details and the words!

    Reply
  65. I’m reading in front of the fire. Or, and here I’ll have to do some research, I’m working on a crossword puzzle and annoying my husband as I ask for help with spelling. I don’t feel too bad because he reads much faster than I do. I, however, remember the details and the words!

    Reply
  66. Perhaps games and cards – maybe chess if it’s an evening for two. Tea and food (chicken, etc) with nuts, cheese and fruit to follow.

    Reply
  67. Perhaps games and cards – maybe chess if it’s an evening for two. Tea and food (chicken, etc) with nuts, cheese and fruit to follow.

    Reply
  68. Perhaps games and cards – maybe chess if it’s an evening for two. Tea and food (chicken, etc) with nuts, cheese and fruit to follow.

    Reply
  69. Perhaps games and cards – maybe chess if it’s an evening for two. Tea and food (chicken, etc) with nuts, cheese and fruit to follow.

    Reply
  70. Perhaps games and cards – maybe chess if it’s an evening for two. Tea and food (chicken, etc) with nuts, cheese and fruit to follow.

    Reply
  71. Hmmmm — I don’t think I’d spend it much differently than I do now. I’d cuddle up by the fire with a nice warm lap-robe and a wonderful Jane Austen novel — and maybe even do a little crochet first (did they do crochet back then – I never see it mentioned?). My supper would be a nice glass of wine with some cold chicken with fruit and cheese.

    Reply
  72. Hmmmm — I don’t think I’d spend it much differently than I do now. I’d cuddle up by the fire with a nice warm lap-robe and a wonderful Jane Austen novel — and maybe even do a little crochet first (did they do crochet back then – I never see it mentioned?). My supper would be a nice glass of wine with some cold chicken with fruit and cheese.

    Reply
  73. Hmmmm — I don’t think I’d spend it much differently than I do now. I’d cuddle up by the fire with a nice warm lap-robe and a wonderful Jane Austen novel — and maybe even do a little crochet first (did they do crochet back then – I never see it mentioned?). My supper would be a nice glass of wine with some cold chicken with fruit and cheese.

    Reply
  74. Hmmmm — I don’t think I’d spend it much differently than I do now. I’d cuddle up by the fire with a nice warm lap-robe and a wonderful Jane Austen novel — and maybe even do a little crochet first (did they do crochet back then – I never see it mentioned?). My supper would be a nice glass of wine with some cold chicken with fruit and cheese.

    Reply
  75. Hmmmm — I don’t think I’d spend it much differently than I do now. I’d cuddle up by the fire with a nice warm lap-robe and a wonderful Jane Austen novel — and maybe even do a little crochet first (did they do crochet back then – I never see it mentioned?). My supper would be a nice glass of wine with some cold chicken with fruit and cheese.

    Reply
  76. If I’m by myself, I’d probably read or paint. I would choose something light for supper such as fruit, cheers, & bread along with either tea or a little wine. Oh heck, who am I kidding, I’d be asleep before supper, so I’m likely not living in tow!

    Reply
  77. If I’m by myself, I’d probably read or paint. I would choose something light for supper such as fruit, cheers, & bread along with either tea or a little wine. Oh heck, who am I kidding, I’d be asleep before supper, so I’m likely not living in tow!

    Reply
  78. If I’m by myself, I’d probably read or paint. I would choose something light for supper such as fruit, cheers, & bread along with either tea or a little wine. Oh heck, who am I kidding, I’d be asleep before supper, so I’m likely not living in tow!

    Reply
  79. If I’m by myself, I’d probably read or paint. I would choose something light for supper such as fruit, cheers, & bread along with either tea or a little wine. Oh heck, who am I kidding, I’d be asleep before supper, so I’m likely not living in tow!

    Reply
  80. If I’m by myself, I’d probably read or paint. I would choose something light for supper such as fruit, cheers, & bread along with either tea or a little wine. Oh heck, who am I kidding, I’d be asleep before supper, so I’m likely not living in tow!

    Reply
  81. It sounds delightful, Christina. My family had singalongs around the piano when I was a kid, especially when my grandmother visited β€” she was an excellent pianist and also liked everyone to dance to her tune — literally AND metaphorically. πŸ™‚ As for 20 queastions, I’m also a fan of the game called Michaelangelo (and other names, I’m sure) where you have to earn the right to ask a direct question (to which the answer is either yes or no.) Lots of fun.

    Reply
  82. It sounds delightful, Christina. My family had singalongs around the piano when I was a kid, especially when my grandmother visited β€” she was an excellent pianist and also liked everyone to dance to her tune — literally AND metaphorically. πŸ™‚ As for 20 queastions, I’m also a fan of the game called Michaelangelo (and other names, I’m sure) where you have to earn the right to ask a direct question (to which the answer is either yes or no.) Lots of fun.

    Reply
  83. It sounds delightful, Christina. My family had singalongs around the piano when I was a kid, especially when my grandmother visited β€” she was an excellent pianist and also liked everyone to dance to her tune — literally AND metaphorically. πŸ™‚ As for 20 queastions, I’m also a fan of the game called Michaelangelo (and other names, I’m sure) where you have to earn the right to ask a direct question (to which the answer is either yes or no.) Lots of fun.

    Reply
  84. It sounds delightful, Christina. My family had singalongs around the piano when I was a kid, especially when my grandmother visited β€” she was an excellent pianist and also liked everyone to dance to her tune — literally AND metaphorically. πŸ™‚ As for 20 queastions, I’m also a fan of the game called Michaelangelo (and other names, I’m sure) where you have to earn the right to ask a direct question (to which the answer is either yes or no.) Lots of fun.

    Reply
  85. It sounds delightful, Christina. My family had singalongs around the piano when I was a kid, especially when my grandmother visited β€” she was an excellent pianist and also liked everyone to dance to her tune — literally AND metaphorically. πŸ™‚ As for 20 queastions, I’m also a fan of the game called Michaelangelo (and other names, I’m sure) where you have to earn the right to ask a direct question (to which the answer is either yes or no.) Lots of fun.

    Reply
  86. Thanks, Mary — yes the meal times were a bit different in those days, especially for the non-working classes.I grew up without TV — my father didn’t approve of it — so many of these activities are very familiar to me.

    Reply
  87. Thanks, Mary — yes the meal times were a bit different in those days, especially for the non-working classes.I grew up without TV — my father didn’t approve of it — so many of these activities are very familiar to me.

    Reply
  88. Thanks, Mary — yes the meal times were a bit different in those days, especially for the non-working classes.I grew up without TV — my father didn’t approve of it — so many of these activities are very familiar to me.

    Reply
  89. Thanks, Mary — yes the meal times were a bit different in those days, especially for the non-working classes.I grew up without TV — my father didn’t approve of it — so many of these activities are very familiar to me.

    Reply
  90. Thanks, Mary — yes the meal times were a bit different in those days, especially for the non-working classes.I grew up without TV — my father didn’t approve of it — so many of these activities are very familiar to me.

    Reply
  91. Beryl, yes, you’ve reminded me of an important choice that I left out — lovely and congenial conversation. The art of conversation was even taught (to girls) in those days. I don’t think gossip needed to be taught, but it sure was popular — then and now πŸ™‚ Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  92. Beryl, yes, you’ve reminded me of an important choice that I left out — lovely and congenial conversation. The art of conversation was even taught (to girls) in those days. I don’t think gossip needed to be taught, but it sure was popular — then and now πŸ™‚ Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  93. Beryl, yes, you’ve reminded me of an important choice that I left out — lovely and congenial conversation. The art of conversation was even taught (to girls) in those days. I don’t think gossip needed to be taught, but it sure was popular — then and now πŸ™‚ Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  94. Beryl, yes, you’ve reminded me of an important choice that I left out — lovely and congenial conversation. The art of conversation was even taught (to girls) in those days. I don’t think gossip needed to be taught, but it sure was popular — then and now πŸ™‚ Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  95. Beryl, yes, you’ve reminded me of an important choice that I left out — lovely and congenial conversation. The art of conversation was even taught (to girls) in those days. I don’t think gossip needed to be taught, but it sure was popular — then and now πŸ™‚ Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  96. Dana, I think repairing things would be VERY Regency — at least unless you were top of the trees and had masses of servants. From my reading, it seems people spent a lot of time refurbishing hats, mending clothes and repairing all sorts of things. And how nice to have a husband who enjoys Jane Austen.

    Reply
  97. Dana, I think repairing things would be VERY Regency — at least unless you were top of the trees and had masses of servants. From my reading, it seems people spent a lot of time refurbishing hats, mending clothes and repairing all sorts of things. And how nice to have a husband who enjoys Jane Austen.

    Reply
  98. Dana, I think repairing things would be VERY Regency — at least unless you were top of the trees and had masses of servants. From my reading, it seems people spent a lot of time refurbishing hats, mending clothes and repairing all sorts of things. And how nice to have a husband who enjoys Jane Austen.

    Reply
  99. Dana, I think repairing things would be VERY Regency — at least unless you were top of the trees and had masses of servants. From my reading, it seems people spent a lot of time refurbishing hats, mending clothes and repairing all sorts of things. And how nice to have a husband who enjoys Jane Austen.

    Reply
  100. Dana, I think repairing things would be VERY Regency — at least unless you were top of the trees and had masses of servants. From my reading, it seems people spent a lot of time refurbishing hats, mending clothes and repairing all sorts of things. And how nice to have a husband who enjoys Jane Austen.

    Reply
  101. Dogs are also heat-seeking missiles, Mary Jo. My dog is even now lying on my feet, and it’s not fondness for my feet, but their proximity to the strip heater in the footwell of my desk. πŸ™‚

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  102. Dogs are also heat-seeking missiles, Mary Jo. My dog is even now lying on my feet, and it’s not fondness for my feet, but their proximity to the strip heater in the footwell of my desk. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  103. Dogs are also heat-seeking missiles, Mary Jo. My dog is even now lying on my feet, and it’s not fondness for my feet, but their proximity to the strip heater in the footwell of my desk. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  104. Dogs are also heat-seeking missiles, Mary Jo. My dog is even now lying on my feet, and it’s not fondness for my feet, but their proximity to the strip heater in the footwell of my desk. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  105. Dogs are also heat-seeking missiles, Mary Jo. My dog is even now lying on my feet, and it’s not fondness for my feet, but their proximity to the strip heater in the footwell of my desk. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  106. My mother was a big quilter, Laurel. Sadly, I don’t think scones will be on your menu β€” bicarb soda (which makes them rise) didn’t come in until after the Regency. But there are plenty of other delicious treats you can have. I can recommend hot toasted crumpets dripping with butter and honey. Though not while you’re sewing. It’s deliciously messy πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  107. My mother was a big quilter, Laurel. Sadly, I don’t think scones will be on your menu β€” bicarb soda (which makes them rise) didn’t come in until after the Regency. But there are plenty of other delicious treats you can have. I can recommend hot toasted crumpets dripping with butter and honey. Though not while you’re sewing. It’s deliciously messy πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  108. My mother was a big quilter, Laurel. Sadly, I don’t think scones will be on your menu β€” bicarb soda (which makes them rise) didn’t come in until after the Regency. But there are plenty of other delicious treats you can have. I can recommend hot toasted crumpets dripping with butter and honey. Though not while you’re sewing. It’s deliciously messy πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  109. My mother was a big quilter, Laurel. Sadly, I don’t think scones will be on your menu β€” bicarb soda (which makes them rise) didn’t come in until after the Regency. But there are plenty of other delicious treats you can have. I can recommend hot toasted crumpets dripping with butter and honey. Though not while you’re sewing. It’s deliciously messy πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  110. My mother was a big quilter, Laurel. Sadly, I don’t think scones will be on your menu β€” bicarb soda (which makes them rise) didn’t come in until after the Regency. But there are plenty of other delicious treats you can have. I can recommend hot toasted crumpets dripping with butter and honey. Though not while you’re sewing. It’s deliciously messy πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  111. Solitaire is addictive, isn’t it, Michele? I have a set (using marbles) and whenever I dust it I end up playing for a bit (distractible? moi? ) and as for solitaire with cards, as a kid I used to play all kinds of games of Patience, even playing Chinese Patience right hand against left.

    Reply
  112. Solitaire is addictive, isn’t it, Michele? I have a set (using marbles) and whenever I dust it I end up playing for a bit (distractible? moi? ) and as for solitaire with cards, as a kid I used to play all kinds of games of Patience, even playing Chinese Patience right hand against left.

    Reply
  113. Solitaire is addictive, isn’t it, Michele? I have a set (using marbles) and whenever I dust it I end up playing for a bit (distractible? moi? ) and as for solitaire with cards, as a kid I used to play all kinds of games of Patience, even playing Chinese Patience right hand against left.

    Reply
  114. Solitaire is addictive, isn’t it, Michele? I have a set (using marbles) and whenever I dust it I end up playing for a bit (distractible? moi? ) and as for solitaire with cards, as a kid I used to play all kinds of games of Patience, even playing Chinese Patience right hand against left.

    Reply
  115. Solitaire is addictive, isn’t it, Michele? I have a set (using marbles) and whenever I dust it I end up playing for a bit (distractible? moi? ) and as for solitaire with cards, as a kid I used to play all kinds of games of Patience, even playing Chinese Patience right hand against left.

    Reply
  116. Quietly sitting by the fire with my sweety. He’d be reading, as he is now. I like my hands to be busy, so I’d be stitching something and occasionally gazing meditatively into the fire, listening to the wind and rain outside the window. The sounds muffled by the heavy curtains but the wind occasionally drifting down the chimney. And some lovely hot steak and kidney pies for supper. A warm mug of blueberry tea ( the alchohlic kind) to give you a warm glow. Every once in a while my love would share something he read and we’d laugh about it or discuss it. But the whole evening just overlaid with the warm glow of being together. Of our busy schedules being on hold for one precious evening. And when we grew tired of the reading and the light grew too dim to see the colours of the threads, we would snuggle on the settee and watch the pictures form in the flames in the hearth. Ahhh bliss….

    Reply
  117. Quietly sitting by the fire with my sweety. He’d be reading, as he is now. I like my hands to be busy, so I’d be stitching something and occasionally gazing meditatively into the fire, listening to the wind and rain outside the window. The sounds muffled by the heavy curtains but the wind occasionally drifting down the chimney. And some lovely hot steak and kidney pies for supper. A warm mug of blueberry tea ( the alchohlic kind) to give you a warm glow. Every once in a while my love would share something he read and we’d laugh about it or discuss it. But the whole evening just overlaid with the warm glow of being together. Of our busy schedules being on hold for one precious evening. And when we grew tired of the reading and the light grew too dim to see the colours of the threads, we would snuggle on the settee and watch the pictures form in the flames in the hearth. Ahhh bliss….

    Reply
  118. Quietly sitting by the fire with my sweety. He’d be reading, as he is now. I like my hands to be busy, so I’d be stitching something and occasionally gazing meditatively into the fire, listening to the wind and rain outside the window. The sounds muffled by the heavy curtains but the wind occasionally drifting down the chimney. And some lovely hot steak and kidney pies for supper. A warm mug of blueberry tea ( the alchohlic kind) to give you a warm glow. Every once in a while my love would share something he read and we’d laugh about it or discuss it. But the whole evening just overlaid with the warm glow of being together. Of our busy schedules being on hold for one precious evening. And when we grew tired of the reading and the light grew too dim to see the colours of the threads, we would snuggle on the settee and watch the pictures form in the flames in the hearth. Ahhh bliss….

    Reply
  119. Quietly sitting by the fire with my sweety. He’d be reading, as he is now. I like my hands to be busy, so I’d be stitching something and occasionally gazing meditatively into the fire, listening to the wind and rain outside the window. The sounds muffled by the heavy curtains but the wind occasionally drifting down the chimney. And some lovely hot steak and kidney pies for supper. A warm mug of blueberry tea ( the alchohlic kind) to give you a warm glow. Every once in a while my love would share something he read and we’d laugh about it or discuss it. But the whole evening just overlaid with the warm glow of being together. Of our busy schedules being on hold for one precious evening. And when we grew tired of the reading and the light grew too dim to see the colours of the threads, we would snuggle on the settee and watch the pictures form in the flames in the hearth. Ahhh bliss….

    Reply
  120. Quietly sitting by the fire with my sweety. He’d be reading, as he is now. I like my hands to be busy, so I’d be stitching something and occasionally gazing meditatively into the fire, listening to the wind and rain outside the window. The sounds muffled by the heavy curtains but the wind occasionally drifting down the chimney. And some lovely hot steak and kidney pies for supper. A warm mug of blueberry tea ( the alchohlic kind) to give you a warm glow. Every once in a while my love would share something he read and we’d laugh about it or discuss it. But the whole evening just overlaid with the warm glow of being together. Of our busy schedules being on hold for one precious evening. And when we grew tired of the reading and the light grew too dim to see the colours of the threads, we would snuggle on the settee and watch the pictures form in the flames in the hearth. Ahhh bliss….

    Reply
  121. I’m rubbish at all those handcrafts. Mending? I’d give a good seamstress my food and say here, you fix that, and take it in a bit cuz you’re eating my share of the food. Quilling? Decoupage? Please. I lived through the 1970s when otherwise sensible people filled their houses with handmade craft junk which their children are now clearing out and sending to charity or donating straight to the dumpster. And the stuff they used for lacquer – indoors! – would rot out anybody’s lungs. No, it’s not my thing πŸ™‚
    Card games are okay, I guess, if they’re not too complicated like bridge or too boring like gin. (Regency had equivalents, I’m sure)
    Most likely I’d either be reading a book myself (probably Jane Austen again), or possibly writing notes (limited to 140 characters) on strips of paper to throw into the wind at dawn πŸ™‚

    Reply
  122. I’m rubbish at all those handcrafts. Mending? I’d give a good seamstress my food and say here, you fix that, and take it in a bit cuz you’re eating my share of the food. Quilling? Decoupage? Please. I lived through the 1970s when otherwise sensible people filled their houses with handmade craft junk which their children are now clearing out and sending to charity or donating straight to the dumpster. And the stuff they used for lacquer – indoors! – would rot out anybody’s lungs. No, it’s not my thing πŸ™‚
    Card games are okay, I guess, if they’re not too complicated like bridge or too boring like gin. (Regency had equivalents, I’m sure)
    Most likely I’d either be reading a book myself (probably Jane Austen again), or possibly writing notes (limited to 140 characters) on strips of paper to throw into the wind at dawn πŸ™‚

    Reply
  123. I’m rubbish at all those handcrafts. Mending? I’d give a good seamstress my food and say here, you fix that, and take it in a bit cuz you’re eating my share of the food. Quilling? Decoupage? Please. I lived through the 1970s when otherwise sensible people filled their houses with handmade craft junk which their children are now clearing out and sending to charity or donating straight to the dumpster. And the stuff they used for lacquer – indoors! – would rot out anybody’s lungs. No, it’s not my thing πŸ™‚
    Card games are okay, I guess, if they’re not too complicated like bridge or too boring like gin. (Regency had equivalents, I’m sure)
    Most likely I’d either be reading a book myself (probably Jane Austen again), or possibly writing notes (limited to 140 characters) on strips of paper to throw into the wind at dawn πŸ™‚

    Reply
  124. I’m rubbish at all those handcrafts. Mending? I’d give a good seamstress my food and say here, you fix that, and take it in a bit cuz you’re eating my share of the food. Quilling? Decoupage? Please. I lived through the 1970s when otherwise sensible people filled their houses with handmade craft junk which their children are now clearing out and sending to charity or donating straight to the dumpster. And the stuff they used for lacquer – indoors! – would rot out anybody’s lungs. No, it’s not my thing πŸ™‚
    Card games are okay, I guess, if they’re not too complicated like bridge or too boring like gin. (Regency had equivalents, I’m sure)
    Most likely I’d either be reading a book myself (probably Jane Austen again), or possibly writing notes (limited to 140 characters) on strips of paper to throw into the wind at dawn πŸ™‚

    Reply
  125. I’m rubbish at all those handcrafts. Mending? I’d give a good seamstress my food and say here, you fix that, and take it in a bit cuz you’re eating my share of the food. Quilling? Decoupage? Please. I lived through the 1970s when otherwise sensible people filled their houses with handmade craft junk which their children are now clearing out and sending to charity or donating straight to the dumpster. And the stuff they used for lacquer – indoors! – would rot out anybody’s lungs. No, it’s not my thing πŸ™‚
    Card games are okay, I guess, if they’re not too complicated like bridge or too boring like gin. (Regency had equivalents, I’m sure)
    Most likely I’d either be reading a book myself (probably Jane Austen again), or possibly writing notes (limited to 140 characters) on strips of paper to throw into the wind at dawn πŸ™‚

    Reply
  126. Thanks, Janice. Not everyone can be a craft goddess πŸ˜‰ but some of the things people made — like that tea caddy in the pic — were amazing. But reading and writing notes sounds just right — though I don’t know about scattering your notes to the winds.

    Reply
  127. Thanks, Janice. Not everyone can be a craft goddess πŸ˜‰ but some of the things people made — like that tea caddy in the pic — were amazing. But reading and writing notes sounds just right — though I don’t know about scattering your notes to the winds.

    Reply
  128. Thanks, Janice. Not everyone can be a craft goddess πŸ˜‰ but some of the things people made — like that tea caddy in the pic — were amazing. But reading and writing notes sounds just right — though I don’t know about scattering your notes to the winds.

    Reply
  129. Thanks, Janice. Not everyone can be a craft goddess πŸ˜‰ but some of the things people made — like that tea caddy in the pic — were amazing. But reading and writing notes sounds just right — though I don’t know about scattering your notes to the winds.

    Reply
  130. Thanks, Janice. Not everyone can be a craft goddess πŸ˜‰ but some of the things people made — like that tea caddy in the pic — were amazing. But reading and writing notes sounds just right — though I don’t know about scattering your notes to the winds.

    Reply
  131. Add Grand Marnier and Amaretto to a pot of really good black tea made properly…. Then doctor it the way you uusually like your tea and enjoy.

    Reply
  132. Add Grand Marnier and Amaretto to a pot of really good black tea made properly…. Then doctor it the way you uusually like your tea and enjoy.

    Reply
  133. Add Grand Marnier and Amaretto to a pot of really good black tea made properly…. Then doctor it the way you uusually like your tea and enjoy.

    Reply
  134. Add Grand Marnier and Amaretto to a pot of really good black tea made properly…. Then doctor it the way you uusually like your tea and enjoy.

    Reply
  135. Add Grand Marnier and Amaretto to a pot of really good black tea made properly…. Then doctor it the way you uusually like your tea and enjoy.

    Reply
  136. I would be sitting as close to the brightest lantern as possible, reading my favourite Wilkie Collins’ novel ‘The Moonstone’. In all likelihood, I would be constantly interrupted by my two pesty younger sisters, the older of whom wants me to read ‘Pride and Prejudice’ out loud for everyone. I really don’t want to. I’ve already read it and – dare I say it? – Jane Austen is not one of my favourite authors. She’s okay but I find her just a little bit boring. Everything takes soo long to happen! So I don’t like to reread them. However, the alternative is helping my baby sister with her embroidery which is even worse, so in the end I will read Pride and Prejudice; just as soon as I finish this chapter, I tell my sister.

    Reply
  137. I would be sitting as close to the brightest lantern as possible, reading my favourite Wilkie Collins’ novel ‘The Moonstone’. In all likelihood, I would be constantly interrupted by my two pesty younger sisters, the older of whom wants me to read ‘Pride and Prejudice’ out loud for everyone. I really don’t want to. I’ve already read it and – dare I say it? – Jane Austen is not one of my favourite authors. She’s okay but I find her just a little bit boring. Everything takes soo long to happen! So I don’t like to reread them. However, the alternative is helping my baby sister with her embroidery which is even worse, so in the end I will read Pride and Prejudice; just as soon as I finish this chapter, I tell my sister.

    Reply
  138. I would be sitting as close to the brightest lantern as possible, reading my favourite Wilkie Collins’ novel ‘The Moonstone’. In all likelihood, I would be constantly interrupted by my two pesty younger sisters, the older of whom wants me to read ‘Pride and Prejudice’ out loud for everyone. I really don’t want to. I’ve already read it and – dare I say it? – Jane Austen is not one of my favourite authors. She’s okay but I find her just a little bit boring. Everything takes soo long to happen! So I don’t like to reread them. However, the alternative is helping my baby sister with her embroidery which is even worse, so in the end I will read Pride and Prejudice; just as soon as I finish this chapter, I tell my sister.

    Reply
  139. I would be sitting as close to the brightest lantern as possible, reading my favourite Wilkie Collins’ novel ‘The Moonstone’. In all likelihood, I would be constantly interrupted by my two pesty younger sisters, the older of whom wants me to read ‘Pride and Prejudice’ out loud for everyone. I really don’t want to. I’ve already read it and – dare I say it? – Jane Austen is not one of my favourite authors. She’s okay but I find her just a little bit boring. Everything takes soo long to happen! So I don’t like to reread them. However, the alternative is helping my baby sister with her embroidery which is even worse, so in the end I will read Pride and Prejudice; just as soon as I finish this chapter, I tell my sister.

    Reply
  140. I would be sitting as close to the brightest lantern as possible, reading my favourite Wilkie Collins’ novel ‘The Moonstone’. In all likelihood, I would be constantly interrupted by my two pesty younger sisters, the older of whom wants me to read ‘Pride and Prejudice’ out loud for everyone. I really don’t want to. I’ve already read it and – dare I say it? – Jane Austen is not one of my favourite authors. She’s okay but I find her just a little bit boring. Everything takes soo long to happen! So I don’t like to reread them. However, the alternative is helping my baby sister with her embroidery which is even worse, so in the end I will read Pride and Prejudice; just as soon as I finish this chapter, I tell my sister.

    Reply
  141. Ooh, Laura, thanks — I haven’t read The Moonstone.Must look it up. I’m not much of a fan of anyone reading aloud to me, not unless I’m busy with my hands. It always feels a bit slow to me as I read much faster to myself than anyone reading aloud. But give me a job to do, especially a dreary one, and having a book read aloud makes the work fly.

    Reply
  142. Ooh, Laura, thanks — I haven’t read The Moonstone.Must look it up. I’m not much of a fan of anyone reading aloud to me, not unless I’m busy with my hands. It always feels a bit slow to me as I read much faster to myself than anyone reading aloud. But give me a job to do, especially a dreary one, and having a book read aloud makes the work fly.

    Reply
  143. Ooh, Laura, thanks — I haven’t read The Moonstone.Must look it up. I’m not much of a fan of anyone reading aloud to me, not unless I’m busy with my hands. It always feels a bit slow to me as I read much faster to myself than anyone reading aloud. But give me a job to do, especially a dreary one, and having a book read aloud makes the work fly.

    Reply
  144. Ooh, Laura, thanks — I haven’t read The Moonstone.Must look it up. I’m not much of a fan of anyone reading aloud to me, not unless I’m busy with my hands. It always feels a bit slow to me as I read much faster to myself than anyone reading aloud. But give me a job to do, especially a dreary one, and having a book read aloud makes the work fly.

    Reply
  145. Ooh, Laura, thanks — I haven’t read The Moonstone.Must look it up. I’m not much of a fan of anyone reading aloud to me, not unless I’m busy with my hands. It always feels a bit slow to me as I read much faster to myself than anyone reading aloud. But give me a job to do, especially a dreary one, and having a book read aloud makes the work fly.

    Reply
  146. I think the game Fox and Geese is the same one I learned from my grandfather, using a homemade board, but he called it Wolf and Sheep. So that would be fun to play again.
    I don’t think I’d like to try most of those crafts by firelight, so I would probably be knitting. And then some cold sliced chicken or cheese sandwiches, a bit of reading, and so to bed!

    Reply
  147. I think the game Fox and Geese is the same one I learned from my grandfather, using a homemade board, but he called it Wolf and Sheep. So that would be fun to play again.
    I don’t think I’d like to try most of those crafts by firelight, so I would probably be knitting. And then some cold sliced chicken or cheese sandwiches, a bit of reading, and so to bed!

    Reply
  148. I think the game Fox and Geese is the same one I learned from my grandfather, using a homemade board, but he called it Wolf and Sheep. So that would be fun to play again.
    I don’t think I’d like to try most of those crafts by firelight, so I would probably be knitting. And then some cold sliced chicken or cheese sandwiches, a bit of reading, and so to bed!

    Reply
  149. I think the game Fox and Geese is the same one I learned from my grandfather, using a homemade board, but he called it Wolf and Sheep. So that would be fun to play again.
    I don’t think I’d like to try most of those crafts by firelight, so I would probably be knitting. And then some cold sliced chicken or cheese sandwiches, a bit of reading, and so to bed!

    Reply
  150. I think the game Fox and Geese is the same one I learned from my grandfather, using a homemade board, but he called it Wolf and Sheep. So that would be fun to play again.
    I don’t think I’d like to try most of those crafts by firelight, so I would probably be knitting. And then some cold sliced chicken or cheese sandwiches, a bit of reading, and so to bed!

    Reply
  151. Im sure it is probably the same game, Karin — my research indicated there were many variations of the game. I found it interesting and have downloaded the instructions to teach myself how to play it.

    Reply
  152. Im sure it is probably the same game, Karin — my research indicated there were many variations of the game. I found it interesting and have downloaded the instructions to teach myself how to play it.

    Reply
  153. Im sure it is probably the same game, Karin — my research indicated there were many variations of the game. I found it interesting and have downloaded the instructions to teach myself how to play it.

    Reply
  154. Im sure it is probably the same game, Karin — my research indicated there were many variations of the game. I found it interesting and have downloaded the instructions to teach myself how to play it.

    Reply
  155. Im sure it is probably the same game, Karin — my research indicated there were many variations of the game. I found it interesting and have downloaded the instructions to teach myself how to play it.

    Reply
  156. I’ll be reading reading reading. It’s just what I do. Sometimes when I’m watching a tv programme with hubby, I’m actually reading as well. And I can still follow the programme better than him lol!
    I still have a son and daughter in their twenties living at home so Saturday night is Family Movie Night. We each get a turn to pick a film and then everyone has to watch it. I’ve discovered many new movies this way that I would otherwise have passed over. So no real Regency activities there I suppose although I knit as well.

    Reply
  157. I’ll be reading reading reading. It’s just what I do. Sometimes when I’m watching a tv programme with hubby, I’m actually reading as well. And I can still follow the programme better than him lol!
    I still have a son and daughter in their twenties living at home so Saturday night is Family Movie Night. We each get a turn to pick a film and then everyone has to watch it. I’ve discovered many new movies this way that I would otherwise have passed over. So no real Regency activities there I suppose although I knit as well.

    Reply
  158. I’ll be reading reading reading. It’s just what I do. Sometimes when I’m watching a tv programme with hubby, I’m actually reading as well. And I can still follow the programme better than him lol!
    I still have a son and daughter in their twenties living at home so Saturday night is Family Movie Night. We each get a turn to pick a film and then everyone has to watch it. I’ve discovered many new movies this way that I would otherwise have passed over. So no real Regency activities there I suppose although I knit as well.

    Reply
  159. I’ll be reading reading reading. It’s just what I do. Sometimes when I’m watching a tv programme with hubby, I’m actually reading as well. And I can still follow the programme better than him lol!
    I still have a son and daughter in their twenties living at home so Saturday night is Family Movie Night. We each get a turn to pick a film and then everyone has to watch it. I’ve discovered many new movies this way that I would otherwise have passed over. So no real Regency activities there I suppose although I knit as well.

    Reply
  160. I’ll be reading reading reading. It’s just what I do. Sometimes when I’m watching a tv programme with hubby, I’m actually reading as well. And I can still follow the programme better than him lol!
    I still have a son and daughter in their twenties living at home so Saturday night is Family Movie Night. We each get a turn to pick a film and then everyone has to watch it. I’ve discovered many new movies this way that I would otherwise have passed over. So no real Regency activities there I suppose although I knit as well.

    Reply
  161. Your scenario sounds absolutely lovely. However, since I’m bad at handiwork (I’d probably struggle for years over a simple embroidery) and avoid games like the plague (at heart I’m competitive, but I don’t like the “Must WIN” spirit that sometimes overtakes me or my . . . BELOVED family members!), I’d probably settle in with a good book. Assuming I had children, I’d read to them as long as possible before bedtime or encourage them to make up stories with me and my husband if there weren’t enough children’s tales to keep us going. Of course I’m assuming this perfect scenario includes staff, so I wouldn’t have to be worrying about laundry, dishes, or tomorrow’s meals! And speaking of curling up with a good book, I can’t wait for The Summer Bride to come out!

    Reply
  162. Your scenario sounds absolutely lovely. However, since I’m bad at handiwork (I’d probably struggle for years over a simple embroidery) and avoid games like the plague (at heart I’m competitive, but I don’t like the “Must WIN” spirit that sometimes overtakes me or my . . . BELOVED family members!), I’d probably settle in with a good book. Assuming I had children, I’d read to them as long as possible before bedtime or encourage them to make up stories with me and my husband if there weren’t enough children’s tales to keep us going. Of course I’m assuming this perfect scenario includes staff, so I wouldn’t have to be worrying about laundry, dishes, or tomorrow’s meals! And speaking of curling up with a good book, I can’t wait for The Summer Bride to come out!

    Reply
  163. Your scenario sounds absolutely lovely. However, since I’m bad at handiwork (I’d probably struggle for years over a simple embroidery) and avoid games like the plague (at heart I’m competitive, but I don’t like the “Must WIN” spirit that sometimes overtakes me or my . . . BELOVED family members!), I’d probably settle in with a good book. Assuming I had children, I’d read to them as long as possible before bedtime or encourage them to make up stories with me and my husband if there weren’t enough children’s tales to keep us going. Of course I’m assuming this perfect scenario includes staff, so I wouldn’t have to be worrying about laundry, dishes, or tomorrow’s meals! And speaking of curling up with a good book, I can’t wait for The Summer Bride to come out!

    Reply
  164. Your scenario sounds absolutely lovely. However, since I’m bad at handiwork (I’d probably struggle for years over a simple embroidery) and avoid games like the plague (at heart I’m competitive, but I don’t like the “Must WIN” spirit that sometimes overtakes me or my . . . BELOVED family members!), I’d probably settle in with a good book. Assuming I had children, I’d read to them as long as possible before bedtime or encourage them to make up stories with me and my husband if there weren’t enough children’s tales to keep us going. Of course I’m assuming this perfect scenario includes staff, so I wouldn’t have to be worrying about laundry, dishes, or tomorrow’s meals! And speaking of curling up with a good book, I can’t wait for The Summer Bride to come out!

    Reply
  165. Your scenario sounds absolutely lovely. However, since I’m bad at handiwork (I’d probably struggle for years over a simple embroidery) and avoid games like the plague (at heart I’m competitive, but I don’t like the “Must WIN” spirit that sometimes overtakes me or my . . . BELOVED family members!), I’d probably settle in with a good book. Assuming I had children, I’d read to them as long as possible before bedtime or encourage them to make up stories with me and my husband if there weren’t enough children’s tales to keep us going. Of course I’m assuming this perfect scenario includes staff, so I wouldn’t have to be worrying about laundry, dishes, or tomorrow’s meals! And speaking of curling up with a good book, I can’t wait for The Summer Bride to come out!

    Reply
  166. I’d be curled up on a chair as near to the heat as possible with my nose in a book and probably a cat on my lap . A nice glass of whisky liqueur (Drambuie) within reach and maybe some cold meat and pickle. Not a lot different to today really ! The husband is glued to the European Cup Football so I have retreated to the office with the laptop the dog and a glass of tonic water ! The dog will undoubtedly climb onto my lap as soon as I move onto an easy chair and with a bit of luck himself will make coffee at half time and my latest read is just waiting to be picked up !

    Reply
  167. I’d be curled up on a chair as near to the heat as possible with my nose in a book and probably a cat on my lap . A nice glass of whisky liqueur (Drambuie) within reach and maybe some cold meat and pickle. Not a lot different to today really ! The husband is glued to the European Cup Football so I have retreated to the office with the laptop the dog and a glass of tonic water ! The dog will undoubtedly climb onto my lap as soon as I move onto an easy chair and with a bit of luck himself will make coffee at half time and my latest read is just waiting to be picked up !

    Reply
  168. I’d be curled up on a chair as near to the heat as possible with my nose in a book and probably a cat on my lap . A nice glass of whisky liqueur (Drambuie) within reach and maybe some cold meat and pickle. Not a lot different to today really ! The husband is glued to the European Cup Football so I have retreated to the office with the laptop the dog and a glass of tonic water ! The dog will undoubtedly climb onto my lap as soon as I move onto an easy chair and with a bit of luck himself will make coffee at half time and my latest read is just waiting to be picked up !

    Reply
  169. I’d be curled up on a chair as near to the heat as possible with my nose in a book and probably a cat on my lap . A nice glass of whisky liqueur (Drambuie) within reach and maybe some cold meat and pickle. Not a lot different to today really ! The husband is glued to the European Cup Football so I have retreated to the office with the laptop the dog and a glass of tonic water ! The dog will undoubtedly climb onto my lap as soon as I move onto an easy chair and with a bit of luck himself will make coffee at half time and my latest read is just waiting to be picked up !

    Reply
  170. I’d be curled up on a chair as near to the heat as possible with my nose in a book and probably a cat on my lap . A nice glass of whisky liqueur (Drambuie) within reach and maybe some cold meat and pickle. Not a lot different to today really ! The husband is glued to the European Cup Football so I have retreated to the office with the laptop the dog and a glass of tonic water ! The dog will undoubtedly climb onto my lap as soon as I move onto an easy chair and with a bit of luck himself will make coffee at half time and my latest read is just waiting to be picked up !

    Reply
  171. If I lived in the regency era, I’d likely be the scullery maid in which case my rare evening off might be when all the lords and ladies are out at the theater. In that case, I’d probably be happy to get to bed early after a few flirtatious words with the youngest footman.
    If I were the lady of the house, however, enjoying a rare evening at home, I’d enjoy sitting in front of the fire and reading Byron’s The Corsair to my husband. He’d be sipping some madeira while I’d be drinking tea.

    Reply
  172. If I lived in the regency era, I’d likely be the scullery maid in which case my rare evening off might be when all the lords and ladies are out at the theater. In that case, I’d probably be happy to get to bed early after a few flirtatious words with the youngest footman.
    If I were the lady of the house, however, enjoying a rare evening at home, I’d enjoy sitting in front of the fire and reading Byron’s The Corsair to my husband. He’d be sipping some madeira while I’d be drinking tea.

    Reply
  173. If I lived in the regency era, I’d likely be the scullery maid in which case my rare evening off might be when all the lords and ladies are out at the theater. In that case, I’d probably be happy to get to bed early after a few flirtatious words with the youngest footman.
    If I were the lady of the house, however, enjoying a rare evening at home, I’d enjoy sitting in front of the fire and reading Byron’s The Corsair to my husband. He’d be sipping some madeira while I’d be drinking tea.

    Reply
  174. If I lived in the regency era, I’d likely be the scullery maid in which case my rare evening off might be when all the lords and ladies are out at the theater. In that case, I’d probably be happy to get to bed early after a few flirtatious words with the youngest footman.
    If I were the lady of the house, however, enjoying a rare evening at home, I’d enjoy sitting in front of the fire and reading Byron’s The Corsair to my husband. He’d be sipping some madeira while I’d be drinking tea.

    Reply
  175. If I lived in the regency era, I’d likely be the scullery maid in which case my rare evening off might be when all the lords and ladies are out at the theater. In that case, I’d probably be happy to get to bed early after a few flirtatious words with the youngest footman.
    If I were the lady of the house, however, enjoying a rare evening at home, I’d enjoy sitting in front of the fire and reading Byron’s The Corsair to my husband. He’d be sipping some madeira while I’d be drinking tea.

    Reply
  176. Margaret, the must win spirit is amazing, isnt it? It can completely overtake and change a persons personality, so the extent that there are some people I wont play games with, because they become so cut-throat and serious about it that all fun and enjoyment is driven out.

    Reply
  177. Margaret, the must win spirit is amazing, isnt it? It can completely overtake and change a persons personality, so the extent that there are some people I wont play games with, because they become so cut-throat and serious about it that all fun and enjoyment is driven out.

    Reply
  178. Margaret, the must win spirit is amazing, isnt it? It can completely overtake and change a persons personality, so the extent that there are some people I wont play games with, because they become so cut-throat and serious about it that all fun and enjoyment is driven out.

    Reply
  179. Margaret, the must win spirit is amazing, isnt it? It can completely overtake and change a persons personality, so the extent that there are some people I wont play games with, because they become so cut-throat and serious about it that all fun and enjoyment is driven out.

    Reply
  180. Margaret, the must win spirit is amazing, isnt it? It can completely overtake and change a persons personality, so the extent that there are some people I wont play games with, because they become so cut-throat and serious about it that all fun and enjoyment is driven out.

    Reply
  181. Possibly not the youngest footman, Kareni — he could be 16. πŸ™‚ And since this is your fantasy, you are not the scullery maid, so a cup of tea and The Corsair sounds delightful.

    Reply
  182. Possibly not the youngest footman, Kareni — he could be 16. πŸ™‚ And since this is your fantasy, you are not the scullery maid, so a cup of tea and The Corsair sounds delightful.

    Reply
  183. Possibly not the youngest footman, Kareni — he could be 16. πŸ™‚ And since this is your fantasy, you are not the scullery maid, so a cup of tea and The Corsair sounds delightful.

    Reply
  184. Possibly not the youngest footman, Kareni — he could be 16. πŸ™‚ And since this is your fantasy, you are not the scullery maid, so a cup of tea and The Corsair sounds delightful.

    Reply
  185. Possibly not the youngest footman, Kareni — he could be 16. πŸ™‚ And since this is your fantasy, you are not the scullery maid, so a cup of tea and The Corsair sounds delightful.

    Reply
  186. I’d probably read and play solitaire. For supper I think tea, toast with cheese on it, and maybe some fruit. Not a lot or I wouldn’t be able to sleep well if at all.

    Reply
  187. I’d probably read and play solitaire. For supper I think tea, toast with cheese on it, and maybe some fruit. Not a lot or I wouldn’t be able to sleep well if at all.

    Reply
  188. I’d probably read and play solitaire. For supper I think tea, toast with cheese on it, and maybe some fruit. Not a lot or I wouldn’t be able to sleep well if at all.

    Reply
  189. I’d probably read and play solitaire. For supper I think tea, toast with cheese on it, and maybe some fruit. Not a lot or I wouldn’t be able to sleep well if at all.

    Reply
  190. I’d probably read and play solitaire. For supper I think tea, toast with cheese on it, and maybe some fruit. Not a lot or I wouldn’t be able to sleep well if at all.

    Reply
  191. Toasted chess is such a comfort food, isnt it, Molly? I have a friend who travels a lot, and the first meal she has when she gets home — breakfast, kunch or dinner, is cheese on toast made exactly how she likes it.

    Reply
  192. Toasted chess is such a comfort food, isnt it, Molly? I have a friend who travels a lot, and the first meal she has when she gets home — breakfast, kunch or dinner, is cheese on toast made exactly how she likes it.

    Reply
  193. Toasted chess is such a comfort food, isnt it, Molly? I have a friend who travels a lot, and the first meal she has when she gets home — breakfast, kunch or dinner, is cheese on toast made exactly how she likes it.

    Reply
  194. Toasted chess is such a comfort food, isnt it, Molly? I have a friend who travels a lot, and the first meal she has when she gets home — breakfast, kunch or dinner, is cheese on toast made exactly how she likes it.

    Reply
  195. Toasted chess is such a comfort food, isnt it, Molly? I have a friend who travels a lot, and the first meal she has when she gets home — breakfast, kunch or dinner, is cheese on toast made exactly how she likes it.

    Reply
  196. I would be doing some embroidery/needle work with some friends and meanwhile each of us would be telling stories: true stories, stories we’d have come up with on the spot or perhaps something recently read. We’d stop from time to time to have some grog and crumb pudding – and, once slightly tipsy, we would go to our bedrooms. Were I to sober up and be unable to sleep afterwards, I’d read Wilkie Collins’s Woman In White or I’d write my own novel, surrounded by my cats.

    Reply
  197. I would be doing some embroidery/needle work with some friends and meanwhile each of us would be telling stories: true stories, stories we’d have come up with on the spot or perhaps something recently read. We’d stop from time to time to have some grog and crumb pudding – and, once slightly tipsy, we would go to our bedrooms. Were I to sober up and be unable to sleep afterwards, I’d read Wilkie Collins’s Woman In White or I’d write my own novel, surrounded by my cats.

    Reply
  198. I would be doing some embroidery/needle work with some friends and meanwhile each of us would be telling stories: true stories, stories we’d have come up with on the spot or perhaps something recently read. We’d stop from time to time to have some grog and crumb pudding – and, once slightly tipsy, we would go to our bedrooms. Were I to sober up and be unable to sleep afterwards, I’d read Wilkie Collins’s Woman In White or I’d write my own novel, surrounded by my cats.

    Reply
  199. I would be doing some embroidery/needle work with some friends and meanwhile each of us would be telling stories: true stories, stories we’d have come up with on the spot or perhaps something recently read. We’d stop from time to time to have some grog and crumb pudding – and, once slightly tipsy, we would go to our bedrooms. Were I to sober up and be unable to sleep afterwards, I’d read Wilkie Collins’s Woman In White or I’d write my own novel, surrounded by my cats.

    Reply
  200. I would be doing some embroidery/needle work with some friends and meanwhile each of us would be telling stories: true stories, stories we’d have come up with on the spot or perhaps something recently read. We’d stop from time to time to have some grog and crumb pudding – and, once slightly tipsy, we would go to our bedrooms. Were I to sober up and be unable to sleep afterwards, I’d read Wilkie Collins’s Woman In White or I’d write my own novel, surrounded by my cats.

    Reply

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