A Proper Cream Tea

Cat 243 Doverby Mary Jo

Afternoon tea is a quintessential English custom, and one that has been discussed on the Word Wenches before when Anne Gracie wrote a delightful post on the subject.  (And if anything, Australians love their afternoon tea even more than Britons do.  And let us not forget the New Zealanders!)

This blog began at the Virginia Festival of the Book, where Joanna Bourne and I were part of a lovely event for romance readers and writers held at a local Barnes & Noble.  Two of the readers said they'd met Jo Beverley in England, and she'd showed them how to have a proper Devonshire cream tea with clotted cream.  They even showed me a nice picture of the three of them on an iPad.

I mentioned this to the Wenches, not all of whom knew the correct way to have clotted cream and scones because not everyone had experienced it.  And a delicious discussion was stimulated!  (Pun intended. <G>)  In fact, it became so complex that I decided I need to do TWO blogs: one on cream, clotted and otherwise, and one on scones.  (True or false: a scone is just a biscuit.  Stand by for fireworks!)  

ClottedCreamFirstly, what is clotted cream? Since fresh milk has a short shelf life, clotted cream is one of the ways developed to preserve cream longer–cheese and butter are other ways.  It's particularly associated with Southwest England, especially Cornwall and Devon.( Photo from Wikipedia.) 

It's made by being indirectly heated, like in a water bath, then slowly cooled.  The thick layer that forms on the top is the clotted cream.  It must have at least 55% butterfat, but averages around 64%.  In the US, that would be categorized as butter, but the flavor is different–rich and sweet with a consistency like soft cream cheese.

The whole purpose of clotted cream is to make cream teas possible.  It's simple, really.  Split a scone and top with fruit preserves (or lemon curd) and a thick layer of clotted cream.  Serve with hot tea.  Delicious!  But already the first controversy Cream_tea_Brightonappears: does one apply the cream first, or the preserves?  Opinions very and can become quite heated, but I believe that a proper Devonshire cream tea requires the clotted cream to go on first, as if it was butter, with the preserves on top.  Aussie Anne Gracie begs to differ.  <G>

Clotted cream still has a short shelf life so it's hard to find outside the UK, though the Devon Cream Company does produces a small bottle that can last for several months before it's opened.  It can be found in really good grocery stores, on Amazon, and sometimes in a little container served with a transatlantic meal on British Airways. <G>  It's not quite as good as fresh clotted cream consumed in Cornwall, but it's still a nice treat. 

Scone with cream and preservesHeaviest sales of clotted cream are during the Wimbledon tennis tournament since cream  teas with strawberry jam are very, very traditional.  It's enough to make one take up tennis watching!

But clotted cream is only the tip of the butterfat iceberg when it comes to the myriad kinds of British cream!  We Americans tend to regard fat with fear and loathing: hence the blue white abomination called skimmed milk.  About the richest cream we can buy is whipping cream, which at around 36% butterfat is about half the intensity of clotted cream, and isn't as easy to whip as a thicker cream would be.

Jersey cowsThe UK has many more kinds of cream.  Double cream has 48% butterfat content and it can be poured over a dessert like apple pie or a fruit crumble.  It also whips beautifully, and as Jo Beverley pointed out, it become the filling of an incredible range of cream cakes such as these made by this company, Darvell and Sons.  Breeds of cows like the Guernsey and Jersey from the Channel Isles have always been prized for the richness of their milk.  That's a Jersey cow to the left.

In the US, one is more likely to find artificial cream (Twinkies, anyone?) or custard, which are just not the same.  I suspect it's a matter of safety–the US is generally warmer than the UK, and we certainly heat our houses to higher temperatures, which risks cream turning bad.  In a cool English kitchen, this isn't as much of a problem because A) it's cool <g> and B) it isn't going to last long enough to spoil!  

There are a number of other grades of British cream, from extra thick double cream (lightly cooked and a bit like clotted cream but the same 48% butterfat content as regular double cream), single cream, and more.  We Americans must make do with half and half, light cream, and heavy whipping cream.  

When I was a kid, we had milk that was pasteurized but not homogenized and the cream would float to the top.  In theory, you'd shake the bottle to mix it before pouring, but if my father was having coffee, he'd pour some of the top milk into his cup since it was the equivalent of half and half.  Now we can buy boxes of half and half, including–light low-fat half and half.  Which really rather misses the point!

The Devon Cream company

Have you ever had a proper cream tea with clotted cream?  Does this blog make you want to try one, or does merely reading about it make your veins clog?  <G>  

Mary Jo, who thinks that every true Anglophile should try a cream tea at least once.

280 thoughts on “A Proper Cream Tea”

  1. I’m not a “sweet” person, and find scones too heavy BEFORE the cream is added, but if we’re talking Wimbledon, I definitely got into the awful-coloured Pimm’s when I lived in London!
    I do like my tea, though. It’s true, we drink a lot of it in Australia (and I have a fresh cup next to me as I type!).
    The link to Anne Gracie’s post isn’t working for me. 🙁

    Reply
  2. I’m not a “sweet” person, and find scones too heavy BEFORE the cream is added, but if we’re talking Wimbledon, I definitely got into the awful-coloured Pimm’s when I lived in London!
    I do like my tea, though. It’s true, we drink a lot of it in Australia (and I have a fresh cup next to me as I type!).
    The link to Anne Gracie’s post isn’t working for me. 🙁

    Reply
  3. I’m not a “sweet” person, and find scones too heavy BEFORE the cream is added, but if we’re talking Wimbledon, I definitely got into the awful-coloured Pimm’s when I lived in London!
    I do like my tea, though. It’s true, we drink a lot of it in Australia (and I have a fresh cup next to me as I type!).
    The link to Anne Gracie’s post isn’t working for me. 🙁

    Reply
  4. I’m not a “sweet” person, and find scones too heavy BEFORE the cream is added, but if we’re talking Wimbledon, I definitely got into the awful-coloured Pimm’s when I lived in London!
    I do like my tea, though. It’s true, we drink a lot of it in Australia (and I have a fresh cup next to me as I type!).
    The link to Anne Gracie’s post isn’t working for me. 🙁

    Reply
  5. I’m not a “sweet” person, and find scones too heavy BEFORE the cream is added, but if we’re talking Wimbledon, I definitely got into the awful-coloured Pimm’s when I lived in London!
    I do like my tea, though. It’s true, we drink a lot of it in Australia (and I have a fresh cup next to me as I type!).
    The link to Anne Gracie’s post isn’t working for me. 🙁

    Reply
  6. As a lifelong Wisconsin resident, I love my dairy fat. My husband and I fell in love with scones and clotted cream during our first visit to England, and now we always schedule at least one proper afternoon tea whenever we are in the UK (and sometimes on trips in other countries). I do not always add the fruit preserves to my scone, but I never skimp on the clotted cream.

    Reply
  7. As a lifelong Wisconsin resident, I love my dairy fat. My husband and I fell in love with scones and clotted cream during our first visit to England, and now we always schedule at least one proper afternoon tea whenever we are in the UK (and sometimes on trips in other countries). I do not always add the fruit preserves to my scone, but I never skimp on the clotted cream.

    Reply
  8. As a lifelong Wisconsin resident, I love my dairy fat. My husband and I fell in love with scones and clotted cream during our first visit to England, and now we always schedule at least one proper afternoon tea whenever we are in the UK (and sometimes on trips in other countries). I do not always add the fruit preserves to my scone, but I never skimp on the clotted cream.

    Reply
  9. As a lifelong Wisconsin resident, I love my dairy fat. My husband and I fell in love with scones and clotted cream during our first visit to England, and now we always schedule at least one proper afternoon tea whenever we are in the UK (and sometimes on trips in other countries). I do not always add the fruit preserves to my scone, but I never skimp on the clotted cream.

    Reply
  10. As a lifelong Wisconsin resident, I love my dairy fat. My husband and I fell in love with scones and clotted cream during our first visit to England, and now we always schedule at least one proper afternoon tea whenever we are in the UK (and sometimes on trips in other countries). I do not always add the fruit preserves to my scone, but I never skimp on the clotted cream.

    Reply
  11. I thank you for instructions on the clotted cream situation. I remember when milk was delivered and on cold days, the cream would freeze and raise the paper lid on the milk bottle. And I know it was always taken to become cream for parents’ coffee. I love the idea of a problem, which came first the cream or the preserves.

    Reply
  12. I thank you for instructions on the clotted cream situation. I remember when milk was delivered and on cold days, the cream would freeze and raise the paper lid on the milk bottle. And I know it was always taken to become cream for parents’ coffee. I love the idea of a problem, which came first the cream or the preserves.

    Reply
  13. I thank you for instructions on the clotted cream situation. I remember when milk was delivered and on cold days, the cream would freeze and raise the paper lid on the milk bottle. And I know it was always taken to become cream for parents’ coffee. I love the idea of a problem, which came first the cream or the preserves.

    Reply
  14. I thank you for instructions on the clotted cream situation. I remember when milk was delivered and on cold days, the cream would freeze and raise the paper lid on the milk bottle. And I know it was always taken to become cream for parents’ coffee. I love the idea of a problem, which came first the cream or the preserves.

    Reply
  15. I thank you for instructions on the clotted cream situation. I remember when milk was delivered and on cold days, the cream would freeze and raise the paper lid on the milk bottle. And I know it was always taken to become cream for parents’ coffee. I love the idea of a problem, which came first the cream or the preserves.

    Reply
  16. I would LOVE to taste, ahem, devour, a proper cream tea. I grew up drinking powdered “blue” milk because that was what we could afford but it hasn’t stopped me from enjoying scones and whipped cream when it was available.
    The best scone I’ve ever eaten was sitting in line at the ferry to leave Vancouver Island, BC last August. Oh my gosh was it good…. Fresh, hot out of the oven, full of berry goodness….anything on it would have been sacrilegious but I’m willing to try other scones with clotted cream.

    Reply
  17. I would LOVE to taste, ahem, devour, a proper cream tea. I grew up drinking powdered “blue” milk because that was what we could afford but it hasn’t stopped me from enjoying scones and whipped cream when it was available.
    The best scone I’ve ever eaten was sitting in line at the ferry to leave Vancouver Island, BC last August. Oh my gosh was it good…. Fresh, hot out of the oven, full of berry goodness….anything on it would have been sacrilegious but I’m willing to try other scones with clotted cream.

    Reply
  18. I would LOVE to taste, ahem, devour, a proper cream tea. I grew up drinking powdered “blue” milk because that was what we could afford but it hasn’t stopped me from enjoying scones and whipped cream when it was available.
    The best scone I’ve ever eaten was sitting in line at the ferry to leave Vancouver Island, BC last August. Oh my gosh was it good…. Fresh, hot out of the oven, full of berry goodness….anything on it would have been sacrilegious but I’m willing to try other scones with clotted cream.

    Reply
  19. I would LOVE to taste, ahem, devour, a proper cream tea. I grew up drinking powdered “blue” milk because that was what we could afford but it hasn’t stopped me from enjoying scones and whipped cream when it was available.
    The best scone I’ve ever eaten was sitting in line at the ferry to leave Vancouver Island, BC last August. Oh my gosh was it good…. Fresh, hot out of the oven, full of berry goodness….anything on it would have been sacrilegious but I’m willing to try other scones with clotted cream.

    Reply
  20. I would LOVE to taste, ahem, devour, a proper cream tea. I grew up drinking powdered “blue” milk because that was what we could afford but it hasn’t stopped me from enjoying scones and whipped cream when it was available.
    The best scone I’ve ever eaten was sitting in line at the ferry to leave Vancouver Island, BC last August. Oh my gosh was it good…. Fresh, hot out of the oven, full of berry goodness….anything on it would have been sacrilegious but I’m willing to try other scones with clotted cream.

    Reply
  21. I’ll never forget my first taste of real clotted cream. Sublime! It was fascinating to learn it’s made by the waterbath cooking and cooling to thicken the already divinely rich cream. It’s a good thing I don’t live in Devon or I’d weight about three tons! There is nothing more sinfully delicious than a fresh baked scone slathering in clotted cream and homemade strawberry jam. (Confession, I have been known to skip the scone and just dip my fingers in cream and jam. I know, I know—BAD GIRL! )

    Reply
  22. I’ll never forget my first taste of real clotted cream. Sublime! It was fascinating to learn it’s made by the waterbath cooking and cooling to thicken the already divinely rich cream. It’s a good thing I don’t live in Devon or I’d weight about three tons! There is nothing more sinfully delicious than a fresh baked scone slathering in clotted cream and homemade strawberry jam. (Confession, I have been known to skip the scone and just dip my fingers in cream and jam. I know, I know—BAD GIRL! )

    Reply
  23. I’ll never forget my first taste of real clotted cream. Sublime! It was fascinating to learn it’s made by the waterbath cooking and cooling to thicken the already divinely rich cream. It’s a good thing I don’t live in Devon or I’d weight about three tons! There is nothing more sinfully delicious than a fresh baked scone slathering in clotted cream and homemade strawberry jam. (Confession, I have been known to skip the scone and just dip my fingers in cream and jam. I know, I know—BAD GIRL! )

    Reply
  24. I’ll never forget my first taste of real clotted cream. Sublime! It was fascinating to learn it’s made by the waterbath cooking and cooling to thicken the already divinely rich cream. It’s a good thing I don’t live in Devon or I’d weight about three tons! There is nothing more sinfully delicious than a fresh baked scone slathering in clotted cream and homemade strawberry jam. (Confession, I have been known to skip the scone and just dip my fingers in cream and jam. I know, I know—BAD GIRL! )

    Reply
  25. I’ll never forget my first taste of real clotted cream. Sublime! It was fascinating to learn it’s made by the waterbath cooking and cooling to thicken the already divinely rich cream. It’s a good thing I don’t live in Devon or I’d weight about three tons! There is nothing more sinfully delicious than a fresh baked scone slathering in clotted cream and homemade strawberry jam. (Confession, I have been known to skip the scone and just dip my fingers in cream and jam. I know, I know—BAD GIRL! )

    Reply
  26. Annette, so true! If the milk was outside and it was freezing, the lids bulged. As to which comes first, the cream or the jam–I suspect that if one puts tradition aside, it become a matter of mouth feel since they would be a little different to bite into.

    Reply
  27. Annette, so true! If the milk was outside and it was freezing, the lids bulged. As to which comes first, the cream or the jam–I suspect that if one puts tradition aside, it become a matter of mouth feel since they would be a little different to bite into.

    Reply
  28. Annette, so true! If the milk was outside and it was freezing, the lids bulged. As to which comes first, the cream or the jam–I suspect that if one puts tradition aside, it become a matter of mouth feel since they would be a little different to bite into.

    Reply
  29. Annette, so true! If the milk was outside and it was freezing, the lids bulged. As to which comes first, the cream or the jam–I suspect that if one puts tradition aside, it become a matter of mouth feel since they would be a little different to bite into.

    Reply
  30. Annette, so true! If the milk was outside and it was freezing, the lids bulged. As to which comes first, the cream or the jam–I suspect that if one puts tradition aside, it become a matter of mouth feel since they would be a little different to bite into.

    Reply
  31. Vicki, that sounds lovely, especially on a cool, moist Pacific Northwest day! But if you’d had a second scone in hand, it might have been worth testing the clotted cream on it just to see. *G*

    Reply
  32. Vicki, that sounds lovely, especially on a cool, moist Pacific Northwest day! But if you’d had a second scone in hand, it might have been worth testing the clotted cream on it just to see. *G*

    Reply
  33. Vicki, that sounds lovely, especially on a cool, moist Pacific Northwest day! But if you’d had a second scone in hand, it might have been worth testing the clotted cream on it just to see. *G*

    Reply
  34. Vicki, that sounds lovely, especially on a cool, moist Pacific Northwest day! But if you’d had a second scone in hand, it might have been worth testing the clotted cream on it just to see. *G*

    Reply
  35. Vicki, that sounds lovely, especially on a cool, moist Pacific Northwest day! But if you’d had a second scone in hand, it might have been worth testing the clotted cream on it just to see. *G*

    Reply
  36. My grandfather owned a creamery and swore on the natural goodness of cream. I remember him holding a bottle of milk with the cream at the top, saying “This is the best part!”
    My first cream tea was in the Cameron Highlands of Malaysia and it was yummy. I definitely wouldn’t mind having tea every day of the week! Of course my arteries would be as bad as Grandpa’s! (His 7th heart attack killed him in 1966!)

    Reply
  37. My grandfather owned a creamery and swore on the natural goodness of cream. I remember him holding a bottle of milk with the cream at the top, saying “This is the best part!”
    My first cream tea was in the Cameron Highlands of Malaysia and it was yummy. I definitely wouldn’t mind having tea every day of the week! Of course my arteries would be as bad as Grandpa’s! (His 7th heart attack killed him in 1966!)

    Reply
  38. My grandfather owned a creamery and swore on the natural goodness of cream. I remember him holding a bottle of milk with the cream at the top, saying “This is the best part!”
    My first cream tea was in the Cameron Highlands of Malaysia and it was yummy. I definitely wouldn’t mind having tea every day of the week! Of course my arteries would be as bad as Grandpa’s! (His 7th heart attack killed him in 1966!)

    Reply
  39. My grandfather owned a creamery and swore on the natural goodness of cream. I remember him holding a bottle of milk with the cream at the top, saying “This is the best part!”
    My first cream tea was in the Cameron Highlands of Malaysia and it was yummy. I definitely wouldn’t mind having tea every day of the week! Of course my arteries would be as bad as Grandpa’s! (His 7th heart attack killed him in 1966!)

    Reply
  40. My grandfather owned a creamery and swore on the natural goodness of cream. I remember him holding a bottle of milk with the cream at the top, saying “This is the best part!”
    My first cream tea was in the Cameron Highlands of Malaysia and it was yummy. I definitely wouldn’t mind having tea every day of the week! Of course my arteries would be as bad as Grandpa’s! (His 7th heart attack killed him in 1966!)

    Reply
  41. On which should come first cream or jam -is that jelly in the states ? Here in Dorset it always was jam first then cream and the Cornish had to be different and do it the other way round !! But which ever way takes your fancy really – still fattening and still delicious !!

    Reply
  42. On which should come first cream or jam -is that jelly in the states ? Here in Dorset it always was jam first then cream and the Cornish had to be different and do it the other way round !! But which ever way takes your fancy really – still fattening and still delicious !!

    Reply
  43. On which should come first cream or jam -is that jelly in the states ? Here in Dorset it always was jam first then cream and the Cornish had to be different and do it the other way round !! But which ever way takes your fancy really – still fattening and still delicious !!

    Reply
  44. On which should come first cream or jam -is that jelly in the states ? Here in Dorset it always was jam first then cream and the Cornish had to be different and do it the other way round !! But which ever way takes your fancy really – still fattening and still delicious !!

    Reply
  45. On which should come first cream or jam -is that jelly in the states ? Here in Dorset it always was jam first then cream and the Cornish had to be different and do it the other way round !! But which ever way takes your fancy really – still fattening and still delicious !!

    Reply
  46. I prefer jam to jelly, but with true clotted cream either tastes wonderful. I think I gained 5 pounds just reading this blog and am now more eager than ever to return to the UK to try all of the different kinds of cream mentioned.

    Reply
  47. I prefer jam to jelly, but with true clotted cream either tastes wonderful. I think I gained 5 pounds just reading this blog and am now more eager than ever to return to the UK to try all of the different kinds of cream mentioned.

    Reply
  48. I prefer jam to jelly, but with true clotted cream either tastes wonderful. I think I gained 5 pounds just reading this blog and am now more eager than ever to return to the UK to try all of the different kinds of cream mentioned.

    Reply
  49. I prefer jam to jelly, but with true clotted cream either tastes wonderful. I think I gained 5 pounds just reading this blog and am now more eager than ever to return to the UK to try all of the different kinds of cream mentioned.

    Reply
  50. I prefer jam to jelly, but with true clotted cream either tastes wonderful. I think I gained 5 pounds just reading this blog and am now more eager than ever to return to the UK to try all of the different kinds of cream mentioned.

    Reply
  51. MJ–
    Is there any chance that the cream helped keep him going through the first six heart attacks? Probably not–no one would claim a cream tea is health food! But I believe one can eat anything in moderation, and that included clotted cream. *G*
    BYW, you inspired me to look up the Cameron Highlands. THe area looks wonderful, and with a beautiful mild climate, apparently. I envy you going there!

    Reply
  52. MJ–
    Is there any chance that the cream helped keep him going through the first six heart attacks? Probably not–no one would claim a cream tea is health food! But I believe one can eat anything in moderation, and that included clotted cream. *G*
    BYW, you inspired me to look up the Cameron Highlands. THe area looks wonderful, and with a beautiful mild climate, apparently. I envy you going there!

    Reply
  53. MJ–
    Is there any chance that the cream helped keep him going through the first six heart attacks? Probably not–no one would claim a cream tea is health food! But I believe one can eat anything in moderation, and that included clotted cream. *G*
    BYW, you inspired me to look up the Cameron Highlands. THe area looks wonderful, and with a beautiful mild climate, apparently. I envy you going there!

    Reply
  54. MJ–
    Is there any chance that the cream helped keep him going through the first six heart attacks? Probably not–no one would claim a cream tea is health food! But I believe one can eat anything in moderation, and that included clotted cream. *G*
    BYW, you inspired me to look up the Cameron Highlands. THe area looks wonderful, and with a beautiful mild climate, apparently. I envy you going there!

    Reply
  55. MJ–
    Is there any chance that the cream helped keep him going through the first six heart attacks? Probably not–no one would claim a cream tea is health food! But I believe one can eat anything in moderation, and that included clotted cream. *G*
    BYW, you inspired me to look up the Cameron Highlands. THe area looks wonderful, and with a beautiful mild climate, apparently. I envy you going there!

    Reply
  56. Jo–
    In the US,jelly is clear while jam has pieces of fruit in it. If there’s a lot of fruit, it would probably be considered fruit preserves.
    So it’s the Cornish that put the cream on first. One wouldn’t expect Cornwall and Devon to agree on such a thing!

    Reply
  57. Jo–
    In the US,jelly is clear while jam has pieces of fruit in it. If there’s a lot of fruit, it would probably be considered fruit preserves.
    So it’s the Cornish that put the cream on first. One wouldn’t expect Cornwall and Devon to agree on such a thing!

    Reply
  58. Jo–
    In the US,jelly is clear while jam has pieces of fruit in it. If there’s a lot of fruit, it would probably be considered fruit preserves.
    So it’s the Cornish that put the cream on first. One wouldn’t expect Cornwall and Devon to agree on such a thing!

    Reply
  59. Jo–
    In the US,jelly is clear while jam has pieces of fruit in it. If there’s a lot of fruit, it would probably be considered fruit preserves.
    So it’s the Cornish that put the cream on first. One wouldn’t expect Cornwall and Devon to agree on such a thing!

    Reply
  60. Jo–
    In the US,jelly is clear while jam has pieces of fruit in it. If there’s a lot of fruit, it would probably be considered fruit preserves.
    So it’s the Cornish that put the cream on first. One wouldn’t expect Cornwall and Devon to agree on such a thing!

    Reply
  61. I live in a cool climate part of Australia (the Blue Mountains about 105kms west of Sydney) and Devonshire Teas used to be a ‘thing’ if you visited the mountains. No one does a decent one anymore because of microwave ovens. Cafe owners think they can make a batch of scones for the day and then heat them up in the microwave before they serve them. The scone goes limp. Yuk. The best scones were served in a cafe in Blackheath by a woman who did drop scones and baked them as you ordered them. Thick cream and raspberry jam. I drool to think of them. Alas she is no longer there. Definitely jam first and then cream. Kiwi friend of mine says they get served with butter and jam and cream in New Zealand. But then, they don’t put jelly in their trifle which is just wrong. 🙂

    Reply
  62. I live in a cool climate part of Australia (the Blue Mountains about 105kms west of Sydney) and Devonshire Teas used to be a ‘thing’ if you visited the mountains. No one does a decent one anymore because of microwave ovens. Cafe owners think they can make a batch of scones for the day and then heat them up in the microwave before they serve them. The scone goes limp. Yuk. The best scones were served in a cafe in Blackheath by a woman who did drop scones and baked them as you ordered them. Thick cream and raspberry jam. I drool to think of them. Alas she is no longer there. Definitely jam first and then cream. Kiwi friend of mine says they get served with butter and jam and cream in New Zealand. But then, they don’t put jelly in their trifle which is just wrong. 🙂

    Reply
  63. I live in a cool climate part of Australia (the Blue Mountains about 105kms west of Sydney) and Devonshire Teas used to be a ‘thing’ if you visited the mountains. No one does a decent one anymore because of microwave ovens. Cafe owners think they can make a batch of scones for the day and then heat them up in the microwave before they serve them. The scone goes limp. Yuk. The best scones were served in a cafe in Blackheath by a woman who did drop scones and baked them as you ordered them. Thick cream and raspberry jam. I drool to think of them. Alas she is no longer there. Definitely jam first and then cream. Kiwi friend of mine says they get served with butter and jam and cream in New Zealand. But then, they don’t put jelly in their trifle which is just wrong. 🙂

    Reply
  64. I live in a cool climate part of Australia (the Blue Mountains about 105kms west of Sydney) and Devonshire Teas used to be a ‘thing’ if you visited the mountains. No one does a decent one anymore because of microwave ovens. Cafe owners think they can make a batch of scones for the day and then heat them up in the microwave before they serve them. The scone goes limp. Yuk. The best scones were served in a cafe in Blackheath by a woman who did drop scones and baked them as you ordered them. Thick cream and raspberry jam. I drool to think of them. Alas she is no longer there. Definitely jam first and then cream. Kiwi friend of mine says they get served with butter and jam and cream in New Zealand. But then, they don’t put jelly in their trifle which is just wrong. 🙂

    Reply
  65. I live in a cool climate part of Australia (the Blue Mountains about 105kms west of Sydney) and Devonshire Teas used to be a ‘thing’ if you visited the mountains. No one does a decent one anymore because of microwave ovens. Cafe owners think they can make a batch of scones for the day and then heat them up in the microwave before they serve them. The scone goes limp. Yuk. The best scones were served in a cafe in Blackheath by a woman who did drop scones and baked them as you ordered them. Thick cream and raspberry jam. I drool to think of them. Alas she is no longer there. Definitely jam first and then cream. Kiwi friend of mine says they get served with butter and jam and cream in New Zealand. But then, they don’t put jelly in their trifle which is just wrong. 🙂

    Reply
  66. Another person here who loves cream teas. My favorite activity is to go visit our favorite afternoon tea shop with my daughter. We go once a year in the summer, and it’s become our special thing to do.

    Reply
  67. Another person here who loves cream teas. My favorite activity is to go visit our favorite afternoon tea shop with my daughter. We go once a year in the summer, and it’s become our special thing to do.

    Reply
  68. Another person here who loves cream teas. My favorite activity is to go visit our favorite afternoon tea shop with my daughter. We go once a year in the summer, and it’s become our special thing to do.

    Reply
  69. Another person here who loves cream teas. My favorite activity is to go visit our favorite afternoon tea shop with my daughter. We go once a year in the summer, and it’s become our special thing to do.

    Reply
  70. Another person here who loves cream teas. My favorite activity is to go visit our favorite afternoon tea shop with my daughter. We go once a year in the summer, and it’s become our special thing to do.

    Reply
  71. I love a good cream tea .. & it’s more or less a Sunday regular for my family … as for the cream first (Devon) or jam first (Cornwall) war,as a Welsh woman living in Dorset who has a total passion for Channel Island extra thick double cream (thank you Marks & Spencer !!), I throw my raspberry jam (heresy I know ..but in my defence I’m Welsh!) on the bottom, so I can have oodles of that glorious Channel Island deliciousness on the top.
    As for making clotted cream.One of the great Rick Steins cookery progs ..Rick Stein’s Food Heroes, I think, has a lovely West Country lady making it in in her kitchen.
    Thanks Mary Jo for clearing up a confusion I’ve had for years .. the half & half thing (Why ???) At least now when I watch Ina Garten I’ll know what she means. I’ve been substituting single cream in her recipes for years !! 🙂

    Reply
  72. I love a good cream tea .. & it’s more or less a Sunday regular for my family … as for the cream first (Devon) or jam first (Cornwall) war,as a Welsh woman living in Dorset who has a total passion for Channel Island extra thick double cream (thank you Marks & Spencer !!), I throw my raspberry jam (heresy I know ..but in my defence I’m Welsh!) on the bottom, so I can have oodles of that glorious Channel Island deliciousness on the top.
    As for making clotted cream.One of the great Rick Steins cookery progs ..Rick Stein’s Food Heroes, I think, has a lovely West Country lady making it in in her kitchen.
    Thanks Mary Jo for clearing up a confusion I’ve had for years .. the half & half thing (Why ???) At least now when I watch Ina Garten I’ll know what she means. I’ve been substituting single cream in her recipes for years !! 🙂

    Reply
  73. I love a good cream tea .. & it’s more or less a Sunday regular for my family … as for the cream first (Devon) or jam first (Cornwall) war,as a Welsh woman living in Dorset who has a total passion for Channel Island extra thick double cream (thank you Marks & Spencer !!), I throw my raspberry jam (heresy I know ..but in my defence I’m Welsh!) on the bottom, so I can have oodles of that glorious Channel Island deliciousness on the top.
    As for making clotted cream.One of the great Rick Steins cookery progs ..Rick Stein’s Food Heroes, I think, has a lovely West Country lady making it in in her kitchen.
    Thanks Mary Jo for clearing up a confusion I’ve had for years .. the half & half thing (Why ???) At least now when I watch Ina Garten I’ll know what she means. I’ve been substituting single cream in her recipes for years !! 🙂

    Reply
  74. I love a good cream tea .. & it’s more or less a Sunday regular for my family … as for the cream first (Devon) or jam first (Cornwall) war,as a Welsh woman living in Dorset who has a total passion for Channel Island extra thick double cream (thank you Marks & Spencer !!), I throw my raspberry jam (heresy I know ..but in my defence I’m Welsh!) on the bottom, so I can have oodles of that glorious Channel Island deliciousness on the top.
    As for making clotted cream.One of the great Rick Steins cookery progs ..Rick Stein’s Food Heroes, I think, has a lovely West Country lady making it in in her kitchen.
    Thanks Mary Jo for clearing up a confusion I’ve had for years .. the half & half thing (Why ???) At least now when I watch Ina Garten I’ll know what she means. I’ve been substituting single cream in her recipes for years !! 🙂

    Reply
  75. I love a good cream tea .. & it’s more or less a Sunday regular for my family … as for the cream first (Devon) or jam first (Cornwall) war,as a Welsh woman living in Dorset who has a total passion for Channel Island extra thick double cream (thank you Marks & Spencer !!), I throw my raspberry jam (heresy I know ..but in my defence I’m Welsh!) on the bottom, so I can have oodles of that glorious Channel Island deliciousness on the top.
    As for making clotted cream.One of the great Rick Steins cookery progs ..Rick Stein’s Food Heroes, I think, has a lovely West Country lady making it in in her kitchen.
    Thanks Mary Jo for clearing up a confusion I’ve had for years .. the half & half thing (Why ???) At least now when I watch Ina Garten I’ll know what she means. I’ve been substituting single cream in her recipes for years !! 🙂

    Reply
  76. DB–I’ve been through the Blue Mountains and they’re gorgeous! But a microwaved scone is not the same as a fresh one. Raspberry jam, yes! A nice tart marmalade is also delicious, and a good sized slather of lemon curd will do nicely, too.
    Butter AND cream? That does sound redundant. *G*

    Reply
  77. DB–I’ve been through the Blue Mountains and they’re gorgeous! But a microwaved scone is not the same as a fresh one. Raspberry jam, yes! A nice tart marmalade is also delicious, and a good sized slather of lemon curd will do nicely, too.
    Butter AND cream? That does sound redundant. *G*

    Reply
  78. DB–I’ve been through the Blue Mountains and they’re gorgeous! But a microwaved scone is not the same as a fresh one. Raspberry jam, yes! A nice tart marmalade is also delicious, and a good sized slather of lemon curd will do nicely, too.
    Butter AND cream? That does sound redundant. *G*

    Reply
  79. DB–I’ve been through the Blue Mountains and they’re gorgeous! But a microwaved scone is not the same as a fresh one. Raspberry jam, yes! A nice tart marmalade is also delicious, and a good sized slather of lemon curd will do nicely, too.
    Butter AND cream? That does sound redundant. *G*

    Reply
  80. DB–I’ve been through the Blue Mountains and they’re gorgeous! But a microwaved scone is not the same as a fresh one. Raspberry jam, yes! A nice tart marmalade is also delicious, and a good sized slather of lemon curd will do nicely, too.
    Butter AND cream? That does sound redundant. *G*

    Reply
  81. Cate, single cream and half & half are pretty good equivalents. What Americans lack is the higher spectrum of creams!
    Nothing wrong with raspberry for your cream tea! I think the tang of raspberry would be perfect. (To be honest, I find most strawberry jams a bit sweet and bland. Give me a good marmalade any day!)

    Reply
  82. Cate, single cream and half & half are pretty good equivalents. What Americans lack is the higher spectrum of creams!
    Nothing wrong with raspberry for your cream tea! I think the tang of raspberry would be perfect. (To be honest, I find most strawberry jams a bit sweet and bland. Give me a good marmalade any day!)

    Reply
  83. Cate, single cream and half & half are pretty good equivalents. What Americans lack is the higher spectrum of creams!
    Nothing wrong with raspberry for your cream tea! I think the tang of raspberry would be perfect. (To be honest, I find most strawberry jams a bit sweet and bland. Give me a good marmalade any day!)

    Reply
  84. Cate, single cream and half & half are pretty good equivalents. What Americans lack is the higher spectrum of creams!
    Nothing wrong with raspberry for your cream tea! I think the tang of raspberry would be perfect. (To be honest, I find most strawberry jams a bit sweet and bland. Give me a good marmalade any day!)

    Reply
  85. Cate, single cream and half & half are pretty good equivalents. What Americans lack is the higher spectrum of creams!
    Nothing wrong with raspberry for your cream tea! I think the tang of raspberry would be perfect. (To be honest, I find most strawberry jams a bit sweet and bland. Give me a good marmalade any day!)

    Reply
  86. This is sacrilege to all you ladies but I don’t like tea. I still go out with friends to what in the US we call high tea so I love the scones, jams, sandwiches and pastries we get served. Mary Jo thanks for explaining the different creams. My question is What in the world is fat free half & half?

    Reply
  87. This is sacrilege to all you ladies but I don’t like tea. I still go out with friends to what in the US we call high tea so I love the scones, jams, sandwiches and pastries we get served. Mary Jo thanks for explaining the different creams. My question is What in the world is fat free half & half?

    Reply
  88. This is sacrilege to all you ladies but I don’t like tea. I still go out with friends to what in the US we call high tea so I love the scones, jams, sandwiches and pastries we get served. Mary Jo thanks for explaining the different creams. My question is What in the world is fat free half & half?

    Reply
  89. This is sacrilege to all you ladies but I don’t like tea. I still go out with friends to what in the US we call high tea so I love the scones, jams, sandwiches and pastries we get served. Mary Jo thanks for explaining the different creams. My question is What in the world is fat free half & half?

    Reply
  90. This is sacrilege to all you ladies but I don’t like tea. I still go out with friends to what in the US we call high tea so I love the scones, jams, sandwiches and pastries we get served. Mary Jo thanks for explaining the different creams. My question is What in the world is fat free half & half?

    Reply
  91. Should I have the chance to spend time in Devon and Cornwall, I shall be sure to anoint my scones in the preferred fashion of the County I’m in!

    Reply
  92. Should I have the chance to spend time in Devon and Cornwall, I shall be sure to anoint my scones in the preferred fashion of the County I’m in!

    Reply
  93. Should I have the chance to spend time in Devon and Cornwall, I shall be sure to anoint my scones in the preferred fashion of the County I’m in!

    Reply
  94. Should I have the chance to spend time in Devon and Cornwall, I shall be sure to anoint my scones in the preferred fashion of the County I’m in!

    Reply
  95. Should I have the chance to spend time in Devon and Cornwall, I shall be sure to anoint my scones in the preferred fashion of the County I’m in!

    Reply
  96. Oftentimes when we have a fresh baked fruity dessert, I eschew ice cream for poured cream. My teeth don’t scream that way from the temperature difference, either.

    Reply
  97. Oftentimes when we have a fresh baked fruity dessert, I eschew ice cream for poured cream. My teeth don’t scream that way from the temperature difference, either.

    Reply
  98. Oftentimes when we have a fresh baked fruity dessert, I eschew ice cream for poured cream. My teeth don’t scream that way from the temperature difference, either.

    Reply
  99. Oftentimes when we have a fresh baked fruity dessert, I eschew ice cream for poured cream. My teeth don’t scream that way from the temperature difference, either.

    Reply
  100. Oftentimes when we have a fresh baked fruity dessert, I eschew ice cream for poured cream. My teeth don’t scream that way from the temperature difference, either.

    Reply
  101. Fat free half & half is an abomination. It has things in it you will not find in your pantry, and your grandmother would not recognize it.
    I do not use fat free “sour cream” for much the same reason. Lowfat yogurt works well as a substitute for full-fat sour cream, without the weird ingredients, in dishes such as stroganoff. I was unable to taste any difference.
    I use 2% milk in my cold cereal and in my iced lattes because I couldn’t tell much of a difference between 2% and 4%. I refuse the blue milk! I know there are sources for full fat dried milk poweder–King Arthur Flour maybe?

    Reply
  102. Fat free half & half is an abomination. It has things in it you will not find in your pantry, and your grandmother would not recognize it.
    I do not use fat free “sour cream” for much the same reason. Lowfat yogurt works well as a substitute for full-fat sour cream, without the weird ingredients, in dishes such as stroganoff. I was unable to taste any difference.
    I use 2% milk in my cold cereal and in my iced lattes because I couldn’t tell much of a difference between 2% and 4%. I refuse the blue milk! I know there are sources for full fat dried milk poweder–King Arthur Flour maybe?

    Reply
  103. Fat free half & half is an abomination. It has things in it you will not find in your pantry, and your grandmother would not recognize it.
    I do not use fat free “sour cream” for much the same reason. Lowfat yogurt works well as a substitute for full-fat sour cream, without the weird ingredients, in dishes such as stroganoff. I was unable to taste any difference.
    I use 2% milk in my cold cereal and in my iced lattes because I couldn’t tell much of a difference between 2% and 4%. I refuse the blue milk! I know there are sources for full fat dried milk poweder–King Arthur Flour maybe?

    Reply
  104. Fat free half & half is an abomination. It has things in it you will not find in your pantry, and your grandmother would not recognize it.
    I do not use fat free “sour cream” for much the same reason. Lowfat yogurt works well as a substitute for full-fat sour cream, without the weird ingredients, in dishes such as stroganoff. I was unable to taste any difference.
    I use 2% milk in my cold cereal and in my iced lattes because I couldn’t tell much of a difference between 2% and 4%. I refuse the blue milk! I know there are sources for full fat dried milk poweder–King Arthur Flour maybe?

    Reply
  105. Fat free half & half is an abomination. It has things in it you will not find in your pantry, and your grandmother would not recognize it.
    I do not use fat free “sour cream” for much the same reason. Lowfat yogurt works well as a substitute for full-fat sour cream, without the weird ingredients, in dishes such as stroganoff. I was unable to taste any difference.
    I use 2% milk in my cold cereal and in my iced lattes because I couldn’t tell much of a difference between 2% and 4%. I refuse the blue milk! I know there are sources for full fat dried milk poweder–King Arthur Flour maybe?

    Reply
  106. I am one of those who will refuse to give up dairy entirely if ordered by the doctor, as it is a quality of life thing with me. Give up sodium, little problem, but I refuse to give up cheese, cream, and milk, or things made with them, especially custards. I do want the cows not to be fed corn (which they can’t digest) or “by products” from animals–they are herbivores! I have occasional lactose intolerance for fluid milk, but there’re remedies for that. I could restrict myself to la acto-ovo pescatarian diet, but I’d miss duck and lamb, and possibly ocassional bits of bacon.
    In 1987, in the three weeks I was in Scotland and England, I had (clotted) cream teas as often as I could manage–I’d happily skip lunch for it. Some were elegant, some just basic–as long as clotted cream, jam/preserves/marmalade/curd, and scones were available alongside a good pot of tea, I’d be there.
    For quite a while, I was able to buy whole (non-homogenised) milk in glass bottles (forget the plastic jugs for it), and I would extract the cream plug from the top, putting it in a small container for use on my toast or crumpet or scone. These days, the “heavy whipping cream” often solidifies in the pint container before I’ve finished it, without going bad, although sometimes there is still non-turned liquid beneath it. I take a knife to extract what I need. Sometimes other members of my household throw the carton away before checking for spoilage.
    When we lived in San Diego and my father was still in the USAF, we’d go to the PX to get some staples. My mother would buy several half-gallon cartons of perfectly good 4% homogenized milk and (shudder) freeze it. It did not reconstitute the texture when thawed. Bleah. Hated the stuff.
    Sally, do you drink coffee or chocolate, or sherry, at the teas where you don’t drink tea?

    Reply
  107. I am one of those who will refuse to give up dairy entirely if ordered by the doctor, as it is a quality of life thing with me. Give up sodium, little problem, but I refuse to give up cheese, cream, and milk, or things made with them, especially custards. I do want the cows not to be fed corn (which they can’t digest) or “by products” from animals–they are herbivores! I have occasional lactose intolerance for fluid milk, but there’re remedies for that. I could restrict myself to la acto-ovo pescatarian diet, but I’d miss duck and lamb, and possibly ocassional bits of bacon.
    In 1987, in the three weeks I was in Scotland and England, I had (clotted) cream teas as often as I could manage–I’d happily skip lunch for it. Some were elegant, some just basic–as long as clotted cream, jam/preserves/marmalade/curd, and scones were available alongside a good pot of tea, I’d be there.
    For quite a while, I was able to buy whole (non-homogenised) milk in glass bottles (forget the plastic jugs for it), and I would extract the cream plug from the top, putting it in a small container for use on my toast or crumpet or scone. These days, the “heavy whipping cream” often solidifies in the pint container before I’ve finished it, without going bad, although sometimes there is still non-turned liquid beneath it. I take a knife to extract what I need. Sometimes other members of my household throw the carton away before checking for spoilage.
    When we lived in San Diego and my father was still in the USAF, we’d go to the PX to get some staples. My mother would buy several half-gallon cartons of perfectly good 4% homogenized milk and (shudder) freeze it. It did not reconstitute the texture when thawed. Bleah. Hated the stuff.
    Sally, do you drink coffee or chocolate, or sherry, at the teas where you don’t drink tea?

    Reply
  108. I am one of those who will refuse to give up dairy entirely if ordered by the doctor, as it is a quality of life thing with me. Give up sodium, little problem, but I refuse to give up cheese, cream, and milk, or things made with them, especially custards. I do want the cows not to be fed corn (which they can’t digest) or “by products” from animals–they are herbivores! I have occasional lactose intolerance for fluid milk, but there’re remedies for that. I could restrict myself to la acto-ovo pescatarian diet, but I’d miss duck and lamb, and possibly ocassional bits of bacon.
    In 1987, in the three weeks I was in Scotland and England, I had (clotted) cream teas as often as I could manage–I’d happily skip lunch for it. Some were elegant, some just basic–as long as clotted cream, jam/preserves/marmalade/curd, and scones were available alongside a good pot of tea, I’d be there.
    For quite a while, I was able to buy whole (non-homogenised) milk in glass bottles (forget the plastic jugs for it), and I would extract the cream plug from the top, putting it in a small container for use on my toast or crumpet or scone. These days, the “heavy whipping cream” often solidifies in the pint container before I’ve finished it, without going bad, although sometimes there is still non-turned liquid beneath it. I take a knife to extract what I need. Sometimes other members of my household throw the carton away before checking for spoilage.
    When we lived in San Diego and my father was still in the USAF, we’d go to the PX to get some staples. My mother would buy several half-gallon cartons of perfectly good 4% homogenized milk and (shudder) freeze it. It did not reconstitute the texture when thawed. Bleah. Hated the stuff.
    Sally, do you drink coffee or chocolate, or sherry, at the teas where you don’t drink tea?

    Reply
  109. I am one of those who will refuse to give up dairy entirely if ordered by the doctor, as it is a quality of life thing with me. Give up sodium, little problem, but I refuse to give up cheese, cream, and milk, or things made with them, especially custards. I do want the cows not to be fed corn (which they can’t digest) or “by products” from animals–they are herbivores! I have occasional lactose intolerance for fluid milk, but there’re remedies for that. I could restrict myself to la acto-ovo pescatarian diet, but I’d miss duck and lamb, and possibly ocassional bits of bacon.
    In 1987, in the three weeks I was in Scotland and England, I had (clotted) cream teas as often as I could manage–I’d happily skip lunch for it. Some were elegant, some just basic–as long as clotted cream, jam/preserves/marmalade/curd, and scones were available alongside a good pot of tea, I’d be there.
    For quite a while, I was able to buy whole (non-homogenised) milk in glass bottles (forget the plastic jugs for it), and I would extract the cream plug from the top, putting it in a small container for use on my toast or crumpet or scone. These days, the “heavy whipping cream” often solidifies in the pint container before I’ve finished it, without going bad, although sometimes there is still non-turned liquid beneath it. I take a knife to extract what I need. Sometimes other members of my household throw the carton away before checking for spoilage.
    When we lived in San Diego and my father was still in the USAF, we’d go to the PX to get some staples. My mother would buy several half-gallon cartons of perfectly good 4% homogenized milk and (shudder) freeze it. It did not reconstitute the texture when thawed. Bleah. Hated the stuff.
    Sally, do you drink coffee or chocolate, or sherry, at the teas where you don’t drink tea?

    Reply
  110. I am one of those who will refuse to give up dairy entirely if ordered by the doctor, as it is a quality of life thing with me. Give up sodium, little problem, but I refuse to give up cheese, cream, and milk, or things made with them, especially custards. I do want the cows not to be fed corn (which they can’t digest) or “by products” from animals–they are herbivores! I have occasional lactose intolerance for fluid milk, but there’re remedies for that. I could restrict myself to la acto-ovo pescatarian diet, but I’d miss duck and lamb, and possibly ocassional bits of bacon.
    In 1987, in the three weeks I was in Scotland and England, I had (clotted) cream teas as often as I could manage–I’d happily skip lunch for it. Some were elegant, some just basic–as long as clotted cream, jam/preserves/marmalade/curd, and scones were available alongside a good pot of tea, I’d be there.
    For quite a while, I was able to buy whole (non-homogenised) milk in glass bottles (forget the plastic jugs for it), and I would extract the cream plug from the top, putting it in a small container for use on my toast or crumpet or scone. These days, the “heavy whipping cream” often solidifies in the pint container before I’ve finished it, without going bad, although sometimes there is still non-turned liquid beneath it. I take a knife to extract what I need. Sometimes other members of my household throw the carton away before checking for spoilage.
    When we lived in San Diego and my father was still in the USAF, we’d go to the PX to get some staples. My mother would buy several half-gallon cartons of perfectly good 4% homogenized milk and (shudder) freeze it. It did not reconstitute the texture when thawed. Bleah. Hated the stuff.
    Sally, do you drink coffee or chocolate, or sherry, at the teas where you don’t drink tea?

    Reply
  111. I had a proper cream tea on my last trip to England . We had it in a private home as well in the hotels where we stayed. I wish I could find those proper scones here instead of the wedge shaped ones .One year on my birthday my daughter bought me a small jar of clotted cream and one of lemon curd from an online source . She gave them to me along with a package of scone mix. I appreciated the effort though the mix was not for the sort of scones we had in Exmouth.

    Reply
  112. I had a proper cream tea on my last trip to England . We had it in a private home as well in the hotels where we stayed. I wish I could find those proper scones here instead of the wedge shaped ones .One year on my birthday my daughter bought me a small jar of clotted cream and one of lemon curd from an online source . She gave them to me along with a package of scone mix. I appreciated the effort though the mix was not for the sort of scones we had in Exmouth.

    Reply
  113. I had a proper cream tea on my last trip to England . We had it in a private home as well in the hotels where we stayed. I wish I could find those proper scones here instead of the wedge shaped ones .One year on my birthday my daughter bought me a small jar of clotted cream and one of lemon curd from an online source . She gave them to me along with a package of scone mix. I appreciated the effort though the mix was not for the sort of scones we had in Exmouth.

    Reply
  114. I had a proper cream tea on my last trip to England . We had it in a private home as well in the hotels where we stayed. I wish I could find those proper scones here instead of the wedge shaped ones .One year on my birthday my daughter bought me a small jar of clotted cream and one of lemon curd from an online source . She gave them to me along with a package of scone mix. I appreciated the effort though the mix was not for the sort of scones we had in Exmouth.

    Reply
  115. I had a proper cream tea on my last trip to England . We had it in a private home as well in the hotels where we stayed. I wish I could find those proper scones here instead of the wedge shaped ones .One year on my birthday my daughter bought me a small jar of clotted cream and one of lemon curd from an online source . She gave them to me along with a package of scone mix. I appreciated the effort though the mix was not for the sort of scones we had in Exmouth.

    Reply
  116. Sally, it’s just what it sounds like: something that looks like light cream (sorta), but has had the fat removed and a bunch of other gunk added back in. I once picked up a quart of it by acciden (it was right next to the regular half and half), and it was DISGUSTING. Had a nasty sweetish taste and a sort of oily feel. I dumped it and have been very careful about what I pick up in the dairy section.

    Reply
  117. Sally, it’s just what it sounds like: something that looks like light cream (sorta), but has had the fat removed and a bunch of other gunk added back in. I once picked up a quart of it by acciden (it was right next to the regular half and half), and it was DISGUSTING. Had a nasty sweetish taste and a sort of oily feel. I dumped it and have been very careful about what I pick up in the dairy section.

    Reply
  118. Sally, it’s just what it sounds like: something that looks like light cream (sorta), but has had the fat removed and a bunch of other gunk added back in. I once picked up a quart of it by acciden (it was right next to the regular half and half), and it was DISGUSTING. Had a nasty sweetish taste and a sort of oily feel. I dumped it and have been very careful about what I pick up in the dairy section.

    Reply
  119. Sally, it’s just what it sounds like: something that looks like light cream (sorta), but has had the fat removed and a bunch of other gunk added back in. I once picked up a quart of it by acciden (it was right next to the regular half and half), and it was DISGUSTING. Had a nasty sweetish taste and a sort of oily feel. I dumped it and have been very careful about what I pick up in the dairy section.

    Reply
  120. Sally, it’s just what it sounds like: something that looks like light cream (sorta), but has had the fat removed and a bunch of other gunk added back in. I once picked up a quart of it by acciden (it was right next to the regular half and half), and it was DISGUSTING. Had a nasty sweetish taste and a sort of oily feel. I dumped it and have been very careful about what I pick up in the dairy section.

    Reply
  121. Marina, you and I are very much on the same page when it comese to dairy! I like to say that I’m descended from centuries of dairy farmers and I need milk, cheese, et al.
    Like you, I’ve found that low fat dairy usually tastes fine. It’s taking out all the fat and adding substitutes that is dreadful.
    A good point that cream on a dessert doesn’t upset teeth the way ice cream can.
    Down with blue milk! Up with double cream!!!!

    Reply
  122. Marina, you and I are very much on the same page when it comese to dairy! I like to say that I’m descended from centuries of dairy farmers and I need milk, cheese, et al.
    Like you, I’ve found that low fat dairy usually tastes fine. It’s taking out all the fat and adding substitutes that is dreadful.
    A good point that cream on a dessert doesn’t upset teeth the way ice cream can.
    Down with blue milk! Up with double cream!!!!

    Reply
  123. Marina, you and I are very much on the same page when it comese to dairy! I like to say that I’m descended from centuries of dairy farmers and I need milk, cheese, et al.
    Like you, I’ve found that low fat dairy usually tastes fine. It’s taking out all the fat and adding substitutes that is dreadful.
    A good point that cream on a dessert doesn’t upset teeth the way ice cream can.
    Down with blue milk! Up with double cream!!!!

    Reply
  124. Marina, you and I are very much on the same page when it comese to dairy! I like to say that I’m descended from centuries of dairy farmers and I need milk, cheese, et al.
    Like you, I’ve found that low fat dairy usually tastes fine. It’s taking out all the fat and adding substitutes that is dreadful.
    A good point that cream on a dessert doesn’t upset teeth the way ice cream can.
    Down with blue milk! Up with double cream!!!!

    Reply
  125. Marina, you and I are very much on the same page when it comese to dairy! I like to say that I’m descended from centuries of dairy farmers and I need milk, cheese, et al.
    Like you, I’ve found that low fat dairy usually tastes fine. It’s taking out all the fat and adding substitutes that is dreadful.
    A good point that cream on a dessert doesn’t upset teeth the way ice cream can.
    Down with blue milk! Up with double cream!!!!

    Reply
  126. Nancy, in about a month I’ll do a post on scones, including recipes. They’re pretty simple to make, actually, though I suspect that subtle difference in flour and butter might give slightly different results.

    Reply
  127. Nancy, in about a month I’ll do a post on scones, including recipes. They’re pretty simple to make, actually, though I suspect that subtle difference in flour and butter might give slightly different results.

    Reply
  128. Nancy, in about a month I’ll do a post on scones, including recipes. They’re pretty simple to make, actually, though I suspect that subtle difference in flour and butter might give slightly different results.

    Reply
  129. Nancy, in about a month I’ll do a post on scones, including recipes. They’re pretty simple to make, actually, though I suspect that subtle difference in flour and butter might give slightly different results.

    Reply
  130. Nancy, in about a month I’ll do a post on scones, including recipes. They’re pretty simple to make, actually, though I suspect that subtle difference in flour and butter might give slightly different results.

    Reply
  131. My cousins treated a friend and I to a lovely Cream Tea in the Blue Mountains when we were visiting Australia several years ago. I could easily become addicted to clotted cream.

    Reply
  132. My cousins treated a friend and I to a lovely Cream Tea in the Blue Mountains when we were visiting Australia several years ago. I could easily become addicted to clotted cream.

    Reply
  133. My cousins treated a friend and I to a lovely Cream Tea in the Blue Mountains when we were visiting Australia several years ago. I could easily become addicted to clotted cream.

    Reply
  134. My cousins treated a friend and I to a lovely Cream Tea in the Blue Mountains when we were visiting Australia several years ago. I could easily become addicted to clotted cream.

    Reply
  135. My cousins treated a friend and I to a lovely Cream Tea in the Blue Mountains when we were visiting Australia several years ago. I could easily become addicted to clotted cream.

    Reply
  136. A lovely article about a lovely tradition. As a vegan, however, I won’t be indulging anytime soon! I know this sounds like heresy, but a nice cup of tea (my favorite is Yorkshire Gold) is still a nice cup of tea with a bit of soy milk added, and one can, indeed, make quite tasty scones without butter. They’re even better when one is given a few minutes peace and quiet to enjoy them and can fit in a bit of reading !

    Reply
  137. A lovely article about a lovely tradition. As a vegan, however, I won’t be indulging anytime soon! I know this sounds like heresy, but a nice cup of tea (my favorite is Yorkshire Gold) is still a nice cup of tea with a bit of soy milk added, and one can, indeed, make quite tasty scones without butter. They’re even better when one is given a few minutes peace and quiet to enjoy them and can fit in a bit of reading !

    Reply
  138. A lovely article about a lovely tradition. As a vegan, however, I won’t be indulging anytime soon! I know this sounds like heresy, but a nice cup of tea (my favorite is Yorkshire Gold) is still a nice cup of tea with a bit of soy milk added, and one can, indeed, make quite tasty scones without butter. They’re even better when one is given a few minutes peace and quiet to enjoy them and can fit in a bit of reading !

    Reply
  139. A lovely article about a lovely tradition. As a vegan, however, I won’t be indulging anytime soon! I know this sounds like heresy, but a nice cup of tea (my favorite is Yorkshire Gold) is still a nice cup of tea with a bit of soy milk added, and one can, indeed, make quite tasty scones without butter. They’re even better when one is given a few minutes peace and quiet to enjoy them and can fit in a bit of reading !

    Reply
  140. A lovely article about a lovely tradition. As a vegan, however, I won’t be indulging anytime soon! I know this sounds like heresy, but a nice cup of tea (my favorite is Yorkshire Gold) is still a nice cup of tea with a bit of soy milk added, and one can, indeed, make quite tasty scones without butter. They’re even better when one is given a few minutes peace and quiet to enjoy them and can fit in a bit of reading !

    Reply
  141. Mary Jo, this article was so interesting. Whenever I have seen mention of clotted cream I wondered just what it was, but got distracted before the opportunity to Google it came about. Thanks! I love all these blog entries.
    As to your question regarding whether this made me cringe at the thought of the artery-clogging fat content of clotted cream, or eager to try the experience: Yes, and Yes again (smile) I’m a lemon curd fan and knowing how bad that is for you I look at it longingly in the store and pass it by. But you know, every once in awhile…. My mouth was watering from the many comments others have made.
    I don’t know about the majority of people reading this but frankly I don’t think many Americans can claim to live their lives in moderation. Oh, some will. But then you get to know them and they are obsessed with something, usually edible or potable. I’m probably safer that clotted cream isn’t readily available. I think I’m going to have to go get some lemon curd and bake some scones. Sigh…..

    Reply
  142. Mary Jo, this article was so interesting. Whenever I have seen mention of clotted cream I wondered just what it was, but got distracted before the opportunity to Google it came about. Thanks! I love all these blog entries.
    As to your question regarding whether this made me cringe at the thought of the artery-clogging fat content of clotted cream, or eager to try the experience: Yes, and Yes again (smile) I’m a lemon curd fan and knowing how bad that is for you I look at it longingly in the store and pass it by. But you know, every once in awhile…. My mouth was watering from the many comments others have made.
    I don’t know about the majority of people reading this but frankly I don’t think many Americans can claim to live their lives in moderation. Oh, some will. But then you get to know them and they are obsessed with something, usually edible or potable. I’m probably safer that clotted cream isn’t readily available. I think I’m going to have to go get some lemon curd and bake some scones. Sigh…..

    Reply
  143. Mary Jo, this article was so interesting. Whenever I have seen mention of clotted cream I wondered just what it was, but got distracted before the opportunity to Google it came about. Thanks! I love all these blog entries.
    As to your question regarding whether this made me cringe at the thought of the artery-clogging fat content of clotted cream, or eager to try the experience: Yes, and Yes again (smile) I’m a lemon curd fan and knowing how bad that is for you I look at it longingly in the store and pass it by. But you know, every once in awhile…. My mouth was watering from the many comments others have made.
    I don’t know about the majority of people reading this but frankly I don’t think many Americans can claim to live their lives in moderation. Oh, some will. But then you get to know them and they are obsessed with something, usually edible or potable. I’m probably safer that clotted cream isn’t readily available. I think I’m going to have to go get some lemon curd and bake some scones. Sigh…..

    Reply
  144. Mary Jo, this article was so interesting. Whenever I have seen mention of clotted cream I wondered just what it was, but got distracted before the opportunity to Google it came about. Thanks! I love all these blog entries.
    As to your question regarding whether this made me cringe at the thought of the artery-clogging fat content of clotted cream, or eager to try the experience: Yes, and Yes again (smile) I’m a lemon curd fan and knowing how bad that is for you I look at it longingly in the store and pass it by. But you know, every once in awhile…. My mouth was watering from the many comments others have made.
    I don’t know about the majority of people reading this but frankly I don’t think many Americans can claim to live their lives in moderation. Oh, some will. But then you get to know them and they are obsessed with something, usually edible or potable. I’m probably safer that clotted cream isn’t readily available. I think I’m going to have to go get some lemon curd and bake some scones. Sigh…..

    Reply
  145. Mary Jo, this article was so interesting. Whenever I have seen mention of clotted cream I wondered just what it was, but got distracted before the opportunity to Google it came about. Thanks! I love all these blog entries.
    As to your question regarding whether this made me cringe at the thought of the artery-clogging fat content of clotted cream, or eager to try the experience: Yes, and Yes again (smile) I’m a lemon curd fan and knowing how bad that is for you I look at it longingly in the store and pass it by. But you know, every once in awhile…. My mouth was watering from the many comments others have made.
    I don’t know about the majority of people reading this but frankly I don’t think many Americans can claim to live their lives in moderation. Oh, some will. But then you get to know them and they are obsessed with something, usually edible or potable. I’m probably safer that clotted cream isn’t readily available. I think I’m going to have to go get some lemon curd and bake some scones. Sigh…..

    Reply
  146. One of my favourite parts of travelling to the UK is being able to have a real cream tea. We are lucky here in Nova Scotia that we can sometimes get the Devonshire cream. In fact, for my Sister’s 40th Birthday party we threw her a full on English high Cream tea with homemade scones, strawberry preserves, Devonshire clotted cream, sandwiches and a Victoria sponge. It was wonderful!! Now I need to start planning another trip back to London so I can enjoy another high tea!!

    Reply
  147. One of my favourite parts of travelling to the UK is being able to have a real cream tea. We are lucky here in Nova Scotia that we can sometimes get the Devonshire cream. In fact, for my Sister’s 40th Birthday party we threw her a full on English high Cream tea with homemade scones, strawberry preserves, Devonshire clotted cream, sandwiches and a Victoria sponge. It was wonderful!! Now I need to start planning another trip back to London so I can enjoy another high tea!!

    Reply
  148. One of my favourite parts of travelling to the UK is being able to have a real cream tea. We are lucky here in Nova Scotia that we can sometimes get the Devonshire cream. In fact, for my Sister’s 40th Birthday party we threw her a full on English high Cream tea with homemade scones, strawberry preserves, Devonshire clotted cream, sandwiches and a Victoria sponge. It was wonderful!! Now I need to start planning another trip back to London so I can enjoy another high tea!!

    Reply
  149. One of my favourite parts of travelling to the UK is being able to have a real cream tea. We are lucky here in Nova Scotia that we can sometimes get the Devonshire cream. In fact, for my Sister’s 40th Birthday party we threw her a full on English high Cream tea with homemade scones, strawberry preserves, Devonshire clotted cream, sandwiches and a Victoria sponge. It was wonderful!! Now I need to start planning another trip back to London so I can enjoy another high tea!!

    Reply
  150. One of my favourite parts of travelling to the UK is being able to have a real cream tea. We are lucky here in Nova Scotia that we can sometimes get the Devonshire cream. In fact, for my Sister’s 40th Birthday party we threw her a full on English high Cream tea with homemade scones, strawberry preserves, Devonshire clotted cream, sandwiches and a Victoria sponge. It was wonderful!! Now I need to start planning another trip back to London so I can enjoy another high tea!!

    Reply
  151. What a way to bring back memories! On our first visit to London, my travel buddy treated me to a delicious cream tea in the crypt of St. Paul’s. Half an hour later, we were enjoying an afternoon concert in the church when there came an announcement: “Ladies and gentlemen, there is a fire in the building. Please evacuate at once.” I was standing near the exit and quickly found out you can’t PUSH a revolving door. An exciting afternoon, in more ways than one. Clotted cream forever!

    Reply
  152. What a way to bring back memories! On our first visit to London, my travel buddy treated me to a delicious cream tea in the crypt of St. Paul’s. Half an hour later, we were enjoying an afternoon concert in the church when there came an announcement: “Ladies and gentlemen, there is a fire in the building. Please evacuate at once.” I was standing near the exit and quickly found out you can’t PUSH a revolving door. An exciting afternoon, in more ways than one. Clotted cream forever!

    Reply
  153. What a way to bring back memories! On our first visit to London, my travel buddy treated me to a delicious cream tea in the crypt of St. Paul’s. Half an hour later, we were enjoying an afternoon concert in the church when there came an announcement: “Ladies and gentlemen, there is a fire in the building. Please evacuate at once.” I was standing near the exit and quickly found out you can’t PUSH a revolving door. An exciting afternoon, in more ways than one. Clotted cream forever!

    Reply
  154. What a way to bring back memories! On our first visit to London, my travel buddy treated me to a delicious cream tea in the crypt of St. Paul’s. Half an hour later, we were enjoying an afternoon concert in the church when there came an announcement: “Ladies and gentlemen, there is a fire in the building. Please evacuate at once.” I was standing near the exit and quickly found out you can’t PUSH a revolving door. An exciting afternoon, in more ways than one. Clotted cream forever!

    Reply
  155. What a way to bring back memories! On our first visit to London, my travel buddy treated me to a delicious cream tea in the crypt of St. Paul’s. Half an hour later, we were enjoying an afternoon concert in the church when there came an announcement: “Ladies and gentlemen, there is a fire in the building. Please evacuate at once.” I was standing near the exit and quickly found out you can’t PUSH a revolving door. An exciting afternoon, in more ways than one. Clotted cream forever!

    Reply
  156. Oh Yum! Had a few when I visited England. Last one was twelve years ago. We had visited Salisbury and were driving west to see Tintagel – saw a sign for Devon Cream Tea aand made the stop at a lovely farm – had some yummy home made raspberry jam too!

    Reply
  157. Oh Yum! Had a few when I visited England. Last one was twelve years ago. We had visited Salisbury and were driving west to see Tintagel – saw a sign for Devon Cream Tea aand made the stop at a lovely farm – had some yummy home made raspberry jam too!

    Reply
  158. Oh Yum! Had a few when I visited England. Last one was twelve years ago. We had visited Salisbury and were driving west to see Tintagel – saw a sign for Devon Cream Tea aand made the stop at a lovely farm – had some yummy home made raspberry jam too!

    Reply
  159. Oh Yum! Had a few when I visited England. Last one was twelve years ago. We had visited Salisbury and were driving west to see Tintagel – saw a sign for Devon Cream Tea aand made the stop at a lovely farm – had some yummy home made raspberry jam too!

    Reply
  160. Oh Yum! Had a few when I visited England. Last one was twelve years ago. We had visited Salisbury and were driving west to see Tintagel – saw a sign for Devon Cream Tea aand made the stop at a lovely farm – had some yummy home made raspberry jam too!

    Reply
  161. Margaret–
    Being a vegan is very healthy, but sadly, there is no vegan substitute for clotted cream. I’m curious what you use to make your scones without butter, but what matters is the tea, the scone, the time, and the book!

    Reply
  162. Margaret–
    Being a vegan is very healthy, but sadly, there is no vegan substitute for clotted cream. I’m curious what you use to make your scones without butter, but what matters is the tea, the scone, the time, and the book!

    Reply
  163. Margaret–
    Being a vegan is very healthy, but sadly, there is no vegan substitute for clotted cream. I’m curious what you use to make your scones without butter, but what matters is the tea, the scone, the time, and the book!

    Reply
  164. Margaret–
    Being a vegan is very healthy, but sadly, there is no vegan substitute for clotted cream. I’m curious what you use to make your scones without butter, but what matters is the tea, the scone, the time, and the book!

    Reply
  165. Margaret–
    Being a vegan is very healthy, but sadly, there is no vegan substitute for clotted cream. I’m curious what you use to make your scones without butter, but what matters is the tea, the scone, the time, and the book!

    Reply
  166. Michelle–moderation isn’t always easy, but chronic deprivation is worse. Indulge in that lemon curd now and then! There are far worse indulgences. (Anything with artificial cream for starters. )

    Reply
  167. Michelle–moderation isn’t always easy, but chronic deprivation is worse. Indulge in that lemon curd now and then! There are far worse indulgences. (Anything with artificial cream for starters. )

    Reply
  168. Michelle–moderation isn’t always easy, but chronic deprivation is worse. Indulge in that lemon curd now and then! There are far worse indulgences. (Anything with artificial cream for starters. )

    Reply
  169. Michelle–moderation isn’t always easy, but chronic deprivation is worse. Indulge in that lemon curd now and then! There are far worse indulgences. (Anything with artificial cream for starters. )

    Reply
  170. Michelle–moderation isn’t always easy, but chronic deprivation is worse. Indulge in that lemon curd now and then! There are far worse indulgences. (Anything with artificial cream for starters. )

    Reply
  171. Most of you probably won’t believe me, but some people just naturally dislike cream — and I am one of them. I also disliked butter as a child. But I adore milk. I once made myself sick one summer day with a good book and an ever refilled glass of milk. (I wasn’t counting, but my mother wondered what happened to the gallon of milk she had had in the refrigerator. It was missing by supper time.) You must admit, a gallon of milk in about 90 minutes is probably too much of a good thing for a 12-year-old!. I am also a fan of cheeses. But cream has never “set well” with me.
    I will try some real clotted cream if a get a chance. But I may or may not like it. And yes I still like milk, and have gradually worked my way down to skim (for health reasons); but as initially stated, this wasn’t hard for me, because I don’t like cream.
    I am eager to read about the scones. I DO like them — and NO biscuits and scones are not equal — cousins? perhaps?

    Reply
  172. Most of you probably won’t believe me, but some people just naturally dislike cream — and I am one of them. I also disliked butter as a child. But I adore milk. I once made myself sick one summer day with a good book and an ever refilled glass of milk. (I wasn’t counting, but my mother wondered what happened to the gallon of milk she had had in the refrigerator. It was missing by supper time.) You must admit, a gallon of milk in about 90 minutes is probably too much of a good thing for a 12-year-old!. I am also a fan of cheeses. But cream has never “set well” with me.
    I will try some real clotted cream if a get a chance. But I may or may not like it. And yes I still like milk, and have gradually worked my way down to skim (for health reasons); but as initially stated, this wasn’t hard for me, because I don’t like cream.
    I am eager to read about the scones. I DO like them — and NO biscuits and scones are not equal — cousins? perhaps?

    Reply
  173. Most of you probably won’t believe me, but some people just naturally dislike cream — and I am one of them. I also disliked butter as a child. But I adore milk. I once made myself sick one summer day with a good book and an ever refilled glass of milk. (I wasn’t counting, but my mother wondered what happened to the gallon of milk she had had in the refrigerator. It was missing by supper time.) You must admit, a gallon of milk in about 90 minutes is probably too much of a good thing for a 12-year-old!. I am also a fan of cheeses. But cream has never “set well” with me.
    I will try some real clotted cream if a get a chance. But I may or may not like it. And yes I still like milk, and have gradually worked my way down to skim (for health reasons); but as initially stated, this wasn’t hard for me, because I don’t like cream.
    I am eager to read about the scones. I DO like them — and NO biscuits and scones are not equal — cousins? perhaps?

    Reply
  174. Most of you probably won’t believe me, but some people just naturally dislike cream — and I am one of them. I also disliked butter as a child. But I adore milk. I once made myself sick one summer day with a good book and an ever refilled glass of milk. (I wasn’t counting, but my mother wondered what happened to the gallon of milk she had had in the refrigerator. It was missing by supper time.) You must admit, a gallon of milk in about 90 minutes is probably too much of a good thing for a 12-year-old!. I am also a fan of cheeses. But cream has never “set well” with me.
    I will try some real clotted cream if a get a chance. But I may or may not like it. And yes I still like milk, and have gradually worked my way down to skim (for health reasons); but as initially stated, this wasn’t hard for me, because I don’t like cream.
    I am eager to read about the scones. I DO like them — and NO biscuits and scones are not equal — cousins? perhaps?

    Reply
  175. Most of you probably won’t believe me, but some people just naturally dislike cream — and I am one of them. I also disliked butter as a child. But I adore milk. I once made myself sick one summer day with a good book and an ever refilled glass of milk. (I wasn’t counting, but my mother wondered what happened to the gallon of milk she had had in the refrigerator. It was missing by supper time.) You must admit, a gallon of milk in about 90 minutes is probably too much of a good thing for a 12-year-old!. I am also a fan of cheeses. But cream has never “set well” with me.
    I will try some real clotted cream if a get a chance. But I may or may not like it. And yes I still like milk, and have gradually worked my way down to skim (for health reasons); but as initially stated, this wasn’t hard for me, because I don’t like cream.
    I am eager to read about the scones. I DO like them — and NO biscuits and scones are not equal — cousins? perhaps?

    Reply
  176. I’ve never had a proper cream tea, but I’d love to! I did notice when I visited Nova Scotia that the milk tasted much richer. That was a long time ago, I wonder if it’s all been homogenized by now.

    Reply
  177. I’ve never had a proper cream tea, but I’d love to! I did notice when I visited Nova Scotia that the milk tasted much richer. That was a long time ago, I wonder if it’s all been homogenized by now.

    Reply
  178. I’ve never had a proper cream tea, but I’d love to! I did notice when I visited Nova Scotia that the milk tasted much richer. That was a long time ago, I wonder if it’s all been homogenized by now.

    Reply
  179. I’ve never had a proper cream tea, but I’d love to! I did notice when I visited Nova Scotia that the milk tasted much richer. That was a long time ago, I wonder if it’s all been homogenized by now.

    Reply
  180. I’ve never had a proper cream tea, but I’d love to! I did notice when I visited Nova Scotia that the milk tasted much richer. That was a long time ago, I wonder if it’s all been homogenized by now.

    Reply
  181. Sue–you are certainly permitted not to like cream! There is no foodstuff that is universally loved. A gallon of milk in 90 minutes–now THAT is boggling! I think that scones and biscuits would qualify at cousins. Mor on that in a coupls of weeks.

    Reply
  182. Sue–you are certainly permitted not to like cream! There is no foodstuff that is universally loved. A gallon of milk in 90 minutes–now THAT is boggling! I think that scones and biscuits would qualify at cousins. Mor on that in a coupls of weeks.

    Reply
  183. Sue–you are certainly permitted not to like cream! There is no foodstuff that is universally loved. A gallon of milk in 90 minutes–now THAT is boggling! I think that scones and biscuits would qualify at cousins. Mor on that in a coupls of weeks.

    Reply
  184. Sue–you are certainly permitted not to like cream! There is no foodstuff that is universally loved. A gallon of milk in 90 minutes–now THAT is boggling! I think that scones and biscuits would qualify at cousins. Mor on that in a coupls of weeks.

    Reply
  185. Sue–you are certainly permitted not to like cream! There is no foodstuff that is universally loved. A gallon of milk in 90 minutes–now THAT is boggling! I think that scones and biscuits would qualify at cousins. Mor on that in a coupls of weeks.

    Reply
  186. Karin–
    I suspect that Nova Scotians and Canadians in general share a British acceptance of higher butterfat content. The best milk I ever drank (and I drink a lot!) was in western Ireland many years ago, in a village so remote that milk wasn’t pasteurized. It was raw milk, sold to me in a washed up whiskey bottle if I remember correctly–and delicious. *G*

    Reply
  187. Karin–
    I suspect that Nova Scotians and Canadians in general share a British acceptance of higher butterfat content. The best milk I ever drank (and I drink a lot!) was in western Ireland many years ago, in a village so remote that milk wasn’t pasteurized. It was raw milk, sold to me in a washed up whiskey bottle if I remember correctly–and delicious. *G*

    Reply
  188. Karin–
    I suspect that Nova Scotians and Canadians in general share a British acceptance of higher butterfat content. The best milk I ever drank (and I drink a lot!) was in western Ireland many years ago, in a village so remote that milk wasn’t pasteurized. It was raw milk, sold to me in a washed up whiskey bottle if I remember correctly–and delicious. *G*

    Reply
  189. Karin–
    I suspect that Nova Scotians and Canadians in general share a British acceptance of higher butterfat content. The best milk I ever drank (and I drink a lot!) was in western Ireland many years ago, in a village so remote that milk wasn’t pasteurized. It was raw milk, sold to me in a washed up whiskey bottle if I remember correctly–and delicious. *G*

    Reply
  190. Karin–
    I suspect that Nova Scotians and Canadians in general share a British acceptance of higher butterfat content. The best milk I ever drank (and I drink a lot!) was in western Ireland many years ago, in a village so remote that milk wasn’t pasteurized. It was raw milk, sold to me in a washed up whiskey bottle if I remember correctly–and delicious. *G*

    Reply
  191. I had a proper cream tea when I lived in England. It was fabulous! I do not remember which I put on first, the jam or the cream. I also remember having to shake the milk container and still do it. Shared.

    Reply
  192. I had a proper cream tea when I lived in England. It was fabulous! I do not remember which I put on first, the jam or the cream. I also remember having to shake the milk container and still do it. Shared.

    Reply
  193. I had a proper cream tea when I lived in England. It was fabulous! I do not remember which I put on first, the jam or the cream. I also remember having to shake the milk container and still do it. Shared.

    Reply
  194. I had a proper cream tea when I lived in England. It was fabulous! I do not remember which I put on first, the jam or the cream. I also remember having to shake the milk container and still do it. Shared.

    Reply
  195. I had a proper cream tea when I lived in England. It was fabulous! I do not remember which I put on first, the jam or the cream. I also remember having to shake the milk container and still do it. Shared.

    Reply
  196. You need a copy of Mary Berry’ s Baking Bible (the woman’s a National Treasure !) her recipe for scones is simplicity itself, & they always come out brilliantly. Her lemon curd recipe is lush too ( & mix the lemon curd through cream & you have a fantastic filling for a sponge cake )

    Reply
  197. You need a copy of Mary Berry’ s Baking Bible (the woman’s a National Treasure !) her recipe for scones is simplicity itself, & they always come out brilliantly. Her lemon curd recipe is lush too ( & mix the lemon curd through cream & you have a fantastic filling for a sponge cake )

    Reply
  198. You need a copy of Mary Berry’ s Baking Bible (the woman’s a National Treasure !) her recipe for scones is simplicity itself, & they always come out brilliantly. Her lemon curd recipe is lush too ( & mix the lemon curd through cream & you have a fantastic filling for a sponge cake )

    Reply
  199. You need a copy of Mary Berry’ s Baking Bible (the woman’s a National Treasure !) her recipe for scones is simplicity itself, & they always come out brilliantly. Her lemon curd recipe is lush too ( & mix the lemon curd through cream & you have a fantastic filling for a sponge cake )

    Reply
  200. You need a copy of Mary Berry’ s Baking Bible (the woman’s a National Treasure !) her recipe for scones is simplicity itself, & they always come out brilliantly. Her lemon curd recipe is lush too ( & mix the lemon curd through cream & you have a fantastic filling for a sponge cake )

    Reply
  201. I have such fond memories of my trip to the UK in 1985, which included time in Devon and Cornwall and many, many cream teas. I thought clotted cream was the food of the gods. (I had no idea, though, that Americans are missing out on so many other wonderful and higher fat kinds of cream.) These days, having embraced a low-carb way of eating, I could eat the clotted cream but would have to skip the scones and jam. Ah well. Thanks for the great post!

    Reply
  202. I have such fond memories of my trip to the UK in 1985, which included time in Devon and Cornwall and many, many cream teas. I thought clotted cream was the food of the gods. (I had no idea, though, that Americans are missing out on so many other wonderful and higher fat kinds of cream.) These days, having embraced a low-carb way of eating, I could eat the clotted cream but would have to skip the scones and jam. Ah well. Thanks for the great post!

    Reply
  203. I have such fond memories of my trip to the UK in 1985, which included time in Devon and Cornwall and many, many cream teas. I thought clotted cream was the food of the gods. (I had no idea, though, that Americans are missing out on so many other wonderful and higher fat kinds of cream.) These days, having embraced a low-carb way of eating, I could eat the clotted cream but would have to skip the scones and jam. Ah well. Thanks for the great post!

    Reply
  204. I have such fond memories of my trip to the UK in 1985, which included time in Devon and Cornwall and many, many cream teas. I thought clotted cream was the food of the gods. (I had no idea, though, that Americans are missing out on so many other wonderful and higher fat kinds of cream.) These days, having embraced a low-carb way of eating, I could eat the clotted cream but would have to skip the scones and jam. Ah well. Thanks for the great post!

    Reply
  205. I have such fond memories of my trip to the UK in 1985, which included time in Devon and Cornwall and many, many cream teas. I thought clotted cream was the food of the gods. (I had no idea, though, that Americans are missing out on so many other wonderful and higher fat kinds of cream.) These days, having embraced a low-carb way of eating, I could eat the clotted cream but would have to skip the scones and jam. Ah well. Thanks for the great post!

    Reply
  206. If you have a reasonable Hispanic population, the markets sell “crema”, which is very close to the French “creme fraiche”.

    Reply
  207. If you have a reasonable Hispanic population, the markets sell “crema”, which is very close to the French “creme fraiche”.

    Reply
  208. If you have a reasonable Hispanic population, the markets sell “crema”, which is very close to the French “creme fraiche”.

    Reply
  209. If you have a reasonable Hispanic population, the markets sell “crema”, which is very close to the French “creme fraiche”.

    Reply
  210. If you have a reasonable Hispanic population, the markets sell “crema”, which is very close to the French “creme fraiche”.

    Reply

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