A Love letter to Jane Austen

CE-avatar Hi all, Cara/Andrea here,

As spring fever begins to waft through the air, bringing with it beguiling hints that the long, cold winter is finally waving goodbye, I decided it was high time to take off my fuzzy synchilla sweatpants and venture outside of my cozy little writing room. I love sitting for hours on end at my computer, tapping out my stories with my patented two-fingered hunt-and-peck technique. But I also love research forays, which I find are like a breath of fresh air to the creative process.

Whether it’s a museum exhibit, a history lecture, a library talk—I always find something new and exciting to get my heart thumping. Imagination is a wondrous thing, and it’s fascinating to see how each of us has a unique perspective on the world around us.  

JA-letter My foray this week was to the Morgan Library in New York, where they were featuring an exhibit entitled: “A Woman’s Wit: Jane Austen’s Life and Legacy. A small but fabulous show, it consisted mainly of her personal letters to family and friends, along with related prints from the era and early editions of her books. (The Morgan owns the largest collection of Austen’s correspondence, and much of it not been shown for over twenty five years.)

It was an incredible experience to see her actual handwriting, and read her astute observations and pithy comments! She becomes so very real as a person, and at times I was almost laughing aloud at her tart humor and acerbic wit. Not that it was any surprise, but it highlighted how much of her own personality is in her books. Here’s one of my favorite examples: in writing about a new acquaintance, Jane comments, “I do not perceive any Wit or Genius in her . . . She seems to like people rather too easily.”

JA-snippet Her brother Henry notes that Jane loved party-going and was very fond of dancing. (It is noted in the exhibition that most of her heroines and heroes were excellent dancers—Jane and Elizabeth Bennett included.) Indeed, one of Jane’s letters says, “I believe I drank too much wine last night at Hurstbourne.” Not that I think she would give Paris Hilton a run for her money, but apparently Jane liked to cut loose on occasion!

Just to give you all a bit more of the flavor, I’m going to share some more actual quotes, as listed in the Morgan’s exhibit notes:

JAPortrait Austen's niece Caroline recollected: "As to my aunt's personal appearance, hers was the first face I can remember thinking pretty. Her face was rather round than long, she had a bright, but not a pink colour—a clear brown complexion, and very good hazel eyes. Her hair, a darkish brown, curled naturally, it was in short curls around her face. She always wore a cap." (Note, this painting on the right is an idealized portrait of Jane, taken from the unfinished sketch done by her sister Cassandra.)

Jane-bennett In her letter dated 24 May, 1813, Austen reports seeing a painting of how she imagines Jane Bennet, who marries Mr. Bingley at the conclusion of Pride and Prejudice. "Mrs Bingley is exactly herself, size, shaped face, features & sweetness; there never was a greater likeness. She is dressed in a white gown, with green ornaments, which convinces me of what I had always supposed, that green was a favourite colour with her." Scholars suspect that the painting she refers to is the Portrait of Mrs Q by the French portrait painter François Huet-Villiers. (shown at left) Harriet Quentin was a mistress to George IV when he was prince regent. William Blake's 1820 engraving reproduces the portrait. In the same letter, Austen suspects that Elizabeth Bennet, later Mrs. Darcy, would have different preferences: "I dare say Mrs D. will be in Yellow."

Gillray In Austen's letter to Cassandra, written from Bath on 2 June 1799, she commented on the style of contemporary hat decorations with evident amusement: "Flowers are very much worn, & Fruit is still more the thing.—Eliz: has a bunch of Strawberries, & I have seen Grapes, Cherries, Plumbs & Apricots—There are likewise Almonds & raisins, french plums & Tamarinds at the Grocers, but I have never seen any of them in hats." (The image at right is a detail from one of the Gillray prints that are part of the exhibit.)

I adore Jane Austen, and found this exhibit gave me an even deeper appreciation of her as a person and an author. How about you? Are you an Austen fan? Do you have a favorite book or character? (I love Lizzie Bennett and Anne Elliot.)

115 thoughts on “A Love letter to Jane Austen”

  1. I love all Austen’s books. I’m not going to try to go into the reasons why I love her writing; I’d be preaching to the choir if I did.
    I can’t say I have a favorite; it varies from moment to moment. At this moment, it’s probably Emma. Half an hour from now it might be Mansfield Park again. Of all of them, the most I can say is that Northanger Abbey and Lady Susan have been the favorite less often than the others.
    As a good citizen of earthquake country, I keep some emergency supplies in the car – a jacket, a change of clothes, water, almonds, meds and an Austen paperback. You never know.

    Reply
  2. I love all Austen’s books. I’m not going to try to go into the reasons why I love her writing; I’d be preaching to the choir if I did.
    I can’t say I have a favorite; it varies from moment to moment. At this moment, it’s probably Emma. Half an hour from now it might be Mansfield Park again. Of all of them, the most I can say is that Northanger Abbey and Lady Susan have been the favorite less often than the others.
    As a good citizen of earthquake country, I keep some emergency supplies in the car – a jacket, a change of clothes, water, almonds, meds and an Austen paperback. You never know.

    Reply
  3. I love all Austen’s books. I’m not going to try to go into the reasons why I love her writing; I’d be preaching to the choir if I did.
    I can’t say I have a favorite; it varies from moment to moment. At this moment, it’s probably Emma. Half an hour from now it might be Mansfield Park again. Of all of them, the most I can say is that Northanger Abbey and Lady Susan have been the favorite less often than the others.
    As a good citizen of earthquake country, I keep some emergency supplies in the car – a jacket, a change of clothes, water, almonds, meds and an Austen paperback. You never know.

    Reply
  4. I love all Austen’s books. I’m not going to try to go into the reasons why I love her writing; I’d be preaching to the choir if I did.
    I can’t say I have a favorite; it varies from moment to moment. At this moment, it’s probably Emma. Half an hour from now it might be Mansfield Park again. Of all of them, the most I can say is that Northanger Abbey and Lady Susan have been the favorite less often than the others.
    As a good citizen of earthquake country, I keep some emergency supplies in the car – a jacket, a change of clothes, water, almonds, meds and an Austen paperback. You never know.

    Reply
  5. I love all Austen’s books. I’m not going to try to go into the reasons why I love her writing; I’d be preaching to the choir if I did.
    I can’t say I have a favorite; it varies from moment to moment. At this moment, it’s probably Emma. Half an hour from now it might be Mansfield Park again. Of all of them, the most I can say is that Northanger Abbey and Lady Susan have been the favorite less often than the others.
    As a good citizen of earthquake country, I keep some emergency supplies in the car – a jacket, a change of clothes, water, almonds, meds and an Austen paperback. You never know.

    Reply
  6. I think the reason PRIDE AND PREJUDUCE has been a favorite for so long is because of Lizzie. She stood up to the ogre, Lady Catherine, and won. We all like an epic quest where the heroine slays the dragon. **grins**

    Reply
  7. I think the reason PRIDE AND PREJUDUCE has been a favorite for so long is because of Lizzie. She stood up to the ogre, Lady Catherine, and won. We all like an epic quest where the heroine slays the dragon. **grins**

    Reply
  8. I think the reason PRIDE AND PREJUDUCE has been a favorite for so long is because of Lizzie. She stood up to the ogre, Lady Catherine, and won. We all like an epic quest where the heroine slays the dragon. **grins**

    Reply
  9. I think the reason PRIDE AND PREJUDUCE has been a favorite for so long is because of Lizzie. She stood up to the ogre, Lady Catherine, and won. We all like an epic quest where the heroine slays the dragon. **grins**

    Reply
  10. I think the reason PRIDE AND PREJUDUCE has been a favorite for so long is because of Lizzie. She stood up to the ogre, Lady Catherine, and won. We all like an epic quest where the heroine slays the dragon. **grins**

    Reply
  11. Janice, I love your emergency kit! Someone recently asked me that old question of which 3 books would you choose to be marroned on a desert island with. I answered that one of them would be the complete novels of JA, LOL
    Northanger Abbey is my least favorite in terms of real characters,but it was actually her first book (originally entitled “Susan”) And it’s more a parody of the gothic novel than anything else. Still in re-reading it recently I did find snippets of the Jane-to-come.

    Reply
  12. Janice, I love your emergency kit! Someone recently asked me that old question of which 3 books would you choose to be marroned on a desert island with. I answered that one of them would be the complete novels of JA, LOL
    Northanger Abbey is my least favorite in terms of real characters,but it was actually her first book (originally entitled “Susan”) And it’s more a parody of the gothic novel than anything else. Still in re-reading it recently I did find snippets of the Jane-to-come.

    Reply
  13. Janice, I love your emergency kit! Someone recently asked me that old question of which 3 books would you choose to be marroned on a desert island with. I answered that one of them would be the complete novels of JA, LOL
    Northanger Abbey is my least favorite in terms of real characters,but it was actually her first book (originally entitled “Susan”) And it’s more a parody of the gothic novel than anything else. Still in re-reading it recently I did find snippets of the Jane-to-come.

    Reply
  14. Janice, I love your emergency kit! Someone recently asked me that old question of which 3 books would you choose to be marroned on a desert island with. I answered that one of them would be the complete novels of JA, LOL
    Northanger Abbey is my least favorite in terms of real characters,but it was actually her first book (originally entitled “Susan”) And it’s more a parody of the gothic novel than anything else. Still in re-reading it recently I did find snippets of the Jane-to-come.

    Reply
  15. Janice, I love your emergency kit! Someone recently asked me that old question of which 3 books would you choose to be marroned on a desert island with. I answered that one of them would be the complete novels of JA, LOL
    Northanger Abbey is my least favorite in terms of real characters,but it was actually her first book (originally entitled “Susan”) And it’s more a parody of the gothic novel than anything else. Still in re-reading it recently I did find snippets of the Jane-to-come.

    Reply
  16. How delicious to see these up close and personal glimpses of Austen! My faves would be Persuasion and Pride and Prejudice. I agree that Austen’s complete works would be good for a desert island or an earthquake escape kit. *g*

    Reply
  17. How delicious to see these up close and personal glimpses of Austen! My faves would be Persuasion and Pride and Prejudice. I agree that Austen’s complete works would be good for a desert island or an earthquake escape kit. *g*

    Reply
  18. How delicious to see these up close and personal glimpses of Austen! My faves would be Persuasion and Pride and Prejudice. I agree that Austen’s complete works would be good for a desert island or an earthquake escape kit. *g*

    Reply
  19. How delicious to see these up close and personal glimpses of Austen! My faves would be Persuasion and Pride and Prejudice. I agree that Austen’s complete works would be good for a desert island or an earthquake escape kit. *g*

    Reply
  20. How delicious to see these up close and personal glimpses of Austen! My faves would be Persuasion and Pride and Prejudice. I agree that Austen’s complete works would be good for a desert island or an earthquake escape kit. *g*

    Reply
  21. I must put in a word for Catherine Morland. Once, when my daughter Tamsin was about sixteen, I read her the episode where Catherine is at the Assembly Rooms, desperate to avoid John Thorpe and equally desperate to dance with Mr Tilney. Tamsin actually fell off the chair she was laughing so much. She and Catherine were of a similar age and she was obviously right there with her in the ball room. So which of Jane Austen’s heroines appeal may depend on what’s going on in one’s own life.

    Reply
  22. I must put in a word for Catherine Morland. Once, when my daughter Tamsin was about sixteen, I read her the episode where Catherine is at the Assembly Rooms, desperate to avoid John Thorpe and equally desperate to dance with Mr Tilney. Tamsin actually fell off the chair she was laughing so much. She and Catherine were of a similar age and she was obviously right there with her in the ball room. So which of Jane Austen’s heroines appeal may depend on what’s going on in one’s own life.

    Reply
  23. I must put in a word for Catherine Morland. Once, when my daughter Tamsin was about sixteen, I read her the episode where Catherine is at the Assembly Rooms, desperate to avoid John Thorpe and equally desperate to dance with Mr Tilney. Tamsin actually fell off the chair she was laughing so much. She and Catherine were of a similar age and she was obviously right there with her in the ball room. So which of Jane Austen’s heroines appeal may depend on what’s going on in one’s own life.

    Reply
  24. I must put in a word for Catherine Morland. Once, when my daughter Tamsin was about sixteen, I read her the episode where Catherine is at the Assembly Rooms, desperate to avoid John Thorpe and equally desperate to dance with Mr Tilney. Tamsin actually fell off the chair she was laughing so much. She and Catherine were of a similar age and she was obviously right there with her in the ball room. So which of Jane Austen’s heroines appeal may depend on what’s going on in one’s own life.

    Reply
  25. I must put in a word for Catherine Morland. Once, when my daughter Tamsin was about sixteen, I read her the episode where Catherine is at the Assembly Rooms, desperate to avoid John Thorpe and equally desperate to dance with Mr Tilney. Tamsin actually fell off the chair she was laughing so much. She and Catherine were of a similar age and she was obviously right there with her in the ball room. So which of Jane Austen’s heroines appeal may depend on what’s going on in one’s own life.

    Reply
  26. Thank you for sharing the snippets of letters. I will add this library to my list of places to visit on my next New York excursion. I absolutely adore Jane Austen’s books. I have read them all many times and agree with Elizabeth about fluctuating favourites. (On a side note I love the name Tamsin)My least favourite character is always Fanny in Mansfield Park. The ones I most relate to are Elizabeth Bennett, Anne Elliot and Emma Woodhouse.
    That Jane Austen’s gentle wit and social commentary is still selling books today is a great testament to her extraordinary writing ability.

    Reply
  27. Thank you for sharing the snippets of letters. I will add this library to my list of places to visit on my next New York excursion. I absolutely adore Jane Austen’s books. I have read them all many times and agree with Elizabeth about fluctuating favourites. (On a side note I love the name Tamsin)My least favourite character is always Fanny in Mansfield Park. The ones I most relate to are Elizabeth Bennett, Anne Elliot and Emma Woodhouse.
    That Jane Austen’s gentle wit and social commentary is still selling books today is a great testament to her extraordinary writing ability.

    Reply
  28. Thank you for sharing the snippets of letters. I will add this library to my list of places to visit on my next New York excursion. I absolutely adore Jane Austen’s books. I have read them all many times and agree with Elizabeth about fluctuating favourites. (On a side note I love the name Tamsin)My least favourite character is always Fanny in Mansfield Park. The ones I most relate to are Elizabeth Bennett, Anne Elliot and Emma Woodhouse.
    That Jane Austen’s gentle wit and social commentary is still selling books today is a great testament to her extraordinary writing ability.

    Reply
  29. Thank you for sharing the snippets of letters. I will add this library to my list of places to visit on my next New York excursion. I absolutely adore Jane Austen’s books. I have read them all many times and agree with Elizabeth about fluctuating favourites. (On a side note I love the name Tamsin)My least favourite character is always Fanny in Mansfield Park. The ones I most relate to are Elizabeth Bennett, Anne Elliot and Emma Woodhouse.
    That Jane Austen’s gentle wit and social commentary is still selling books today is a great testament to her extraordinary writing ability.

    Reply
  30. Thank you for sharing the snippets of letters. I will add this library to my list of places to visit on my next New York excursion. I absolutely adore Jane Austen’s books. I have read them all many times and agree with Elizabeth about fluctuating favourites. (On a side note I love the name Tamsin)My least favourite character is always Fanny in Mansfield Park. The ones I most relate to are Elizabeth Bennett, Anne Elliot and Emma Woodhouse.
    That Jane Austen’s gentle wit and social commentary is still selling books today is a great testament to her extraordinary writing ability.

    Reply
  31. Universal Library has a number of collections of her letters –
    http://www.archive.org/details/universallibrary
    And they’ve as enjoyable as you say. It’s always a tough thing for me, to read someone’s letters. It’s a conflict. I am an Austen fan but not a devotee. I find I like her more in her letters than in her books. Her letters I might reread part of or quote – her books I pick up maybe once a decade.

    Reply
  32. Universal Library has a number of collections of her letters –
    http://www.archive.org/details/universallibrary
    And they’ve as enjoyable as you say. It’s always a tough thing for me, to read someone’s letters. It’s a conflict. I am an Austen fan but not a devotee. I find I like her more in her letters than in her books. Her letters I might reread part of or quote – her books I pick up maybe once a decade.

    Reply
  33. Universal Library has a number of collections of her letters –
    http://www.archive.org/details/universallibrary
    And they’ve as enjoyable as you say. It’s always a tough thing for me, to read someone’s letters. It’s a conflict. I am an Austen fan but not a devotee. I find I like her more in her letters than in her books. Her letters I might reread part of or quote – her books I pick up maybe once a decade.

    Reply
  34. Universal Library has a number of collections of her letters –
    http://www.archive.org/details/universallibrary
    And they’ve as enjoyable as you say. It’s always a tough thing for me, to read someone’s letters. It’s a conflict. I am an Austen fan but not a devotee. I find I like her more in her letters than in her books. Her letters I might reread part of or quote – her books I pick up maybe once a decade.

    Reply
  35. Universal Library has a number of collections of her letters –
    http://www.archive.org/details/universallibrary
    And they’ve as enjoyable as you say. It’s always a tough thing for me, to read someone’s letters. It’s a conflict. I am an Austen fan but not a devotee. I find I like her more in her letters than in her books. Her letters I might reread part of or quote – her books I pick up maybe once a decade.

    Reply
  36. Wow, I so envy your ability to pop into NYC and see fabulous exhibits like this one! I’m an Austen fan simply because of her voice. I could slap some of her heroines, but Austen’s wit shines through on every page.
    I wonder what age the niece was who said Jane always wore a cap? Did she only know her when Jane was in her thirties? Or–when did Jane start wearing caps?

    Reply
  37. Wow, I so envy your ability to pop into NYC and see fabulous exhibits like this one! I’m an Austen fan simply because of her voice. I could slap some of her heroines, but Austen’s wit shines through on every page.
    I wonder what age the niece was who said Jane always wore a cap? Did she only know her when Jane was in her thirties? Or–when did Jane start wearing caps?

    Reply
  38. Wow, I so envy your ability to pop into NYC and see fabulous exhibits like this one! I’m an Austen fan simply because of her voice. I could slap some of her heroines, but Austen’s wit shines through on every page.
    I wonder what age the niece was who said Jane always wore a cap? Did she only know her when Jane was in her thirties? Or–when did Jane start wearing caps?

    Reply
  39. Wow, I so envy your ability to pop into NYC and see fabulous exhibits like this one! I’m an Austen fan simply because of her voice. I could slap some of her heroines, but Austen’s wit shines through on every page.
    I wonder what age the niece was who said Jane always wore a cap? Did she only know her when Jane was in her thirties? Or–when did Jane start wearing caps?

    Reply
  40. Wow, I so envy your ability to pop into NYC and see fabulous exhibits like this one! I’m an Austen fan simply because of her voice. I could slap some of her heroines, but Austen’s wit shines through on every page.
    I wonder what age the niece was who said Jane always wore a cap? Did she only know her when Jane was in her thirties? Or–when did Jane start wearing caps?

    Reply
  41. Jane Austen was an early and steady influence. Years before the Jane industry cranked up I gave her a very tiny role in one of my own novels, an homage.
    I haven’t got a favourite character, although my first Austen heroine was Elizabeth Bennet so if I had to choose…
    I’m always conscious of the fact that the Portrait of Mrs Q bears a striking resemblance to Jennifer Ehle, who portrayed the future Mrs. Dary in one adaptation of P&P.

    Reply
  42. Jane Austen was an early and steady influence. Years before the Jane industry cranked up I gave her a very tiny role in one of my own novels, an homage.
    I haven’t got a favourite character, although my first Austen heroine was Elizabeth Bennet so if I had to choose…
    I’m always conscious of the fact that the Portrait of Mrs Q bears a striking resemblance to Jennifer Ehle, who portrayed the future Mrs. Dary in one adaptation of P&P.

    Reply
  43. Jane Austen was an early and steady influence. Years before the Jane industry cranked up I gave her a very tiny role in one of my own novels, an homage.
    I haven’t got a favourite character, although my first Austen heroine was Elizabeth Bennet so if I had to choose…
    I’m always conscious of the fact that the Portrait of Mrs Q bears a striking resemblance to Jennifer Ehle, who portrayed the future Mrs. Dary in one adaptation of P&P.

    Reply
  44. Jane Austen was an early and steady influence. Years before the Jane industry cranked up I gave her a very tiny role in one of my own novels, an homage.
    I haven’t got a favourite character, although my first Austen heroine was Elizabeth Bennet so if I had to choose…
    I’m always conscious of the fact that the Portrait of Mrs Q bears a striking resemblance to Jennifer Ehle, who portrayed the future Mrs. Dary in one adaptation of P&P.

    Reply
  45. Jane Austen was an early and steady influence. Years before the Jane industry cranked up I gave her a very tiny role in one of my own novels, an homage.
    I haven’t got a favourite character, although my first Austen heroine was Elizabeth Bennet so if I had to choose…
    I’m always conscious of the fact that the Portrait of Mrs Q bears a striking resemblance to Jennifer Ehle, who portrayed the future Mrs. Dary in one adaptation of P&P.

    Reply
  46. Sherrie, here.
    I’m quite the latecomer to Jane Austen. Knew about her decades before I ever knuckled down and read her. And I can’t even claim to have read her. I “listened” to her via audiobooks. She translates very well to the spoken word, and I listen to my Austen audiobooks often. In fact, I usually end up doing Austen marathons, listening to one audiobook after the other.
    Wherever Jane is, I hope she knows how very revered she is. Her writing is timeless.

    Reply
  47. Sherrie, here.
    I’m quite the latecomer to Jane Austen. Knew about her decades before I ever knuckled down and read her. And I can’t even claim to have read her. I “listened” to her via audiobooks. She translates very well to the spoken word, and I listen to my Austen audiobooks often. In fact, I usually end up doing Austen marathons, listening to one audiobook after the other.
    Wherever Jane is, I hope she knows how very revered she is. Her writing is timeless.

    Reply
  48. Sherrie, here.
    I’m quite the latecomer to Jane Austen. Knew about her decades before I ever knuckled down and read her. And I can’t even claim to have read her. I “listened” to her via audiobooks. She translates very well to the spoken word, and I listen to my Austen audiobooks often. In fact, I usually end up doing Austen marathons, listening to one audiobook after the other.
    Wherever Jane is, I hope she knows how very revered she is. Her writing is timeless.

    Reply
  49. Sherrie, here.
    I’m quite the latecomer to Jane Austen. Knew about her decades before I ever knuckled down and read her. And I can’t even claim to have read her. I “listened” to her via audiobooks. She translates very well to the spoken word, and I listen to my Austen audiobooks often. In fact, I usually end up doing Austen marathons, listening to one audiobook after the other.
    Wherever Jane is, I hope she knows how very revered she is. Her writing is timeless.

    Reply
  50. Sherrie, here.
    I’m quite the latecomer to Jane Austen. Knew about her decades before I ever knuckled down and read her. And I can’t even claim to have read her. I “listened” to her via audiobooks. She translates very well to the spoken word, and I listen to my Austen audiobooks often. In fact, I usually end up doing Austen marathons, listening to one audiobook after the other.
    Wherever Jane is, I hope she knows how very revered she is. Her writing is timeless.

    Reply
  51. Cara, I remember feeling so moved when I saw one of Jane Austen’s original letters. There’s an intimacy about the real thing, isn’t there?
    This post gives me the excuse to share something a friend of mine’s teenage son wrote just this week. His task was to write 2 blogs showing 2 different views of the compulsory study of Jane Austen in school. They’re both excellent, IMO, but I laughed aloud at the “teenage boy” one.
    Here’s a couple of snippets that had me chuckling:
    *Why am I being forced to read something so archaic, girly and boring? ‘Do you often walk to Meryton? Yes I often walk to Meryton’. ‘Will you hold a ball? Oh, do hold a ball!’ Yes! Brilliant! Do! Because I so thoroughly enjoyed reading about the last one.
    * Why can’t the curriculum be more flexible? I’m not part of the social classes of late 18th Century Britain, I don’t do balls, and marriage is a long way off. I don‘t want to read about an endless stream of marriages. ‘Oh no, it‘s Mr Wickham! Quick, get inside 26 year old spinster still living with me. Oh no, he’s coming! What will they think in the village! Quick get the one with the money! Oh, wicked child, why have you refused him!’
    Methinks Jane would be chuckling, too.

    Reply
  52. Cara, I remember feeling so moved when I saw one of Jane Austen’s original letters. There’s an intimacy about the real thing, isn’t there?
    This post gives me the excuse to share something a friend of mine’s teenage son wrote just this week. His task was to write 2 blogs showing 2 different views of the compulsory study of Jane Austen in school. They’re both excellent, IMO, but I laughed aloud at the “teenage boy” one.
    Here’s a couple of snippets that had me chuckling:
    *Why am I being forced to read something so archaic, girly and boring? ‘Do you often walk to Meryton? Yes I often walk to Meryton’. ‘Will you hold a ball? Oh, do hold a ball!’ Yes! Brilliant! Do! Because I so thoroughly enjoyed reading about the last one.
    * Why can’t the curriculum be more flexible? I’m not part of the social classes of late 18th Century Britain, I don’t do balls, and marriage is a long way off. I don‘t want to read about an endless stream of marriages. ‘Oh no, it‘s Mr Wickham! Quick, get inside 26 year old spinster still living with me. Oh no, he’s coming! What will they think in the village! Quick get the one with the money! Oh, wicked child, why have you refused him!’
    Methinks Jane would be chuckling, too.

    Reply
  53. Cara, I remember feeling so moved when I saw one of Jane Austen’s original letters. There’s an intimacy about the real thing, isn’t there?
    This post gives me the excuse to share something a friend of mine’s teenage son wrote just this week. His task was to write 2 blogs showing 2 different views of the compulsory study of Jane Austen in school. They’re both excellent, IMO, but I laughed aloud at the “teenage boy” one.
    Here’s a couple of snippets that had me chuckling:
    *Why am I being forced to read something so archaic, girly and boring? ‘Do you often walk to Meryton? Yes I often walk to Meryton’. ‘Will you hold a ball? Oh, do hold a ball!’ Yes! Brilliant! Do! Because I so thoroughly enjoyed reading about the last one.
    * Why can’t the curriculum be more flexible? I’m not part of the social classes of late 18th Century Britain, I don’t do balls, and marriage is a long way off. I don‘t want to read about an endless stream of marriages. ‘Oh no, it‘s Mr Wickham! Quick, get inside 26 year old spinster still living with me. Oh no, he’s coming! What will they think in the village! Quick get the one with the money! Oh, wicked child, why have you refused him!’
    Methinks Jane would be chuckling, too.

    Reply
  54. Cara, I remember feeling so moved when I saw one of Jane Austen’s original letters. There’s an intimacy about the real thing, isn’t there?
    This post gives me the excuse to share something a friend of mine’s teenage son wrote just this week. His task was to write 2 blogs showing 2 different views of the compulsory study of Jane Austen in school. They’re both excellent, IMO, but I laughed aloud at the “teenage boy” one.
    Here’s a couple of snippets that had me chuckling:
    *Why am I being forced to read something so archaic, girly and boring? ‘Do you often walk to Meryton? Yes I often walk to Meryton’. ‘Will you hold a ball? Oh, do hold a ball!’ Yes! Brilliant! Do! Because I so thoroughly enjoyed reading about the last one.
    * Why can’t the curriculum be more flexible? I’m not part of the social classes of late 18th Century Britain, I don’t do balls, and marriage is a long way off. I don‘t want to read about an endless stream of marriages. ‘Oh no, it‘s Mr Wickham! Quick, get inside 26 year old spinster still living with me. Oh no, he’s coming! What will they think in the village! Quick get the one with the money! Oh, wicked child, why have you refused him!’
    Methinks Jane would be chuckling, too.

    Reply
  55. Cara, I remember feeling so moved when I saw one of Jane Austen’s original letters. There’s an intimacy about the real thing, isn’t there?
    This post gives me the excuse to share something a friend of mine’s teenage son wrote just this week. His task was to write 2 blogs showing 2 different views of the compulsory study of Jane Austen in school. They’re both excellent, IMO, but I laughed aloud at the “teenage boy” one.
    Here’s a couple of snippets that had me chuckling:
    *Why am I being forced to read something so archaic, girly and boring? ‘Do you often walk to Meryton? Yes I often walk to Meryton’. ‘Will you hold a ball? Oh, do hold a ball!’ Yes! Brilliant! Do! Because I so thoroughly enjoyed reading about the last one.
    * Why can’t the curriculum be more flexible? I’m not part of the social classes of late 18th Century Britain, I don’t do balls, and marriage is a long way off. I don‘t want to read about an endless stream of marriages. ‘Oh no, it‘s Mr Wickham! Quick, get inside 26 year old spinster still living with me. Oh no, he’s coming! What will they think in the village! Quick get the one with the money! Oh, wicked child, why have you refused him!’
    Methinks Jane would be chuckling, too.

    Reply
  56. Andrea, thanks for this look into the exhibit.
    Anne, heh, into your teenage friend’s comments. Always a pleasure to read what an intelligent, thinking kid sees of history and fiction.

    Reply
  57. Andrea, thanks for this look into the exhibit.
    Anne, heh, into your teenage friend’s comments. Always a pleasure to read what an intelligent, thinking kid sees of history and fiction.

    Reply
  58. Andrea, thanks for this look into the exhibit.
    Anne, heh, into your teenage friend’s comments. Always a pleasure to read what an intelligent, thinking kid sees of history and fiction.

    Reply
  59. Andrea, thanks for this look into the exhibit.
    Anne, heh, into your teenage friend’s comments. Always a pleasure to read what an intelligent, thinking kid sees of history and fiction.

    Reply
  60. Andrea, thanks for this look into the exhibit.
    Anne, heh, into your teenage friend’s comments. Always a pleasure to read what an intelligent, thinking kid sees of history and fiction.

    Reply
  61. I am an Austen fan, but am more familiar with the movies. I have her books on my shelf waiting for me to read. I will one day soon.
    I had wanted to go to the museum exhibit of her work, but can’t make the trip.
    Elizabeth Bennett is my favorite character. We have a lot in common. Unfortunately, Mr. Darcy and his estate are not among them.

    Reply
  62. I am an Austen fan, but am more familiar with the movies. I have her books on my shelf waiting for me to read. I will one day soon.
    I had wanted to go to the museum exhibit of her work, but can’t make the trip.
    Elizabeth Bennett is my favorite character. We have a lot in common. Unfortunately, Mr. Darcy and his estate are not among them.

    Reply
  63. I am an Austen fan, but am more familiar with the movies. I have her books on my shelf waiting for me to read. I will one day soon.
    I had wanted to go to the museum exhibit of her work, but can’t make the trip.
    Elizabeth Bennett is my favorite character. We have a lot in common. Unfortunately, Mr. Darcy and his estate are not among them.

    Reply
  64. I am an Austen fan, but am more familiar with the movies. I have her books on my shelf waiting for me to read. I will one day soon.
    I had wanted to go to the museum exhibit of her work, but can’t make the trip.
    Elizabeth Bennett is my favorite character. We have a lot in common. Unfortunately, Mr. Darcy and his estate are not among them.

    Reply
  65. I am an Austen fan, but am more familiar with the movies. I have her books on my shelf waiting for me to read. I will one day soon.
    I had wanted to go to the museum exhibit of her work, but can’t make the trip.
    Elizabeth Bennett is my favorite character. We have a lot in common. Unfortunately, Mr. Darcy and his estate are not among them.

    Reply
  66. I have been an Austen fan since childhood, and like the character in “you’ve got mail” I have probably read Pride and Prejudice 200 times. (or at least 100 times) But, I haven’t been an Austen researcher, so thanks for the tidbits of writing and the info about the Morgan library. I think my reading of romance is related to wishing I had more Jane Austen to read. I primarily read romances set in Regency ( and Georgian) England and I am looking for a certain kind of voice– I don’t pick up a book if the sentences are too short.

    Reply
  67. I have been an Austen fan since childhood, and like the character in “you’ve got mail” I have probably read Pride and Prejudice 200 times. (or at least 100 times) But, I haven’t been an Austen researcher, so thanks for the tidbits of writing and the info about the Morgan library. I think my reading of romance is related to wishing I had more Jane Austen to read. I primarily read romances set in Regency ( and Georgian) England and I am looking for a certain kind of voice– I don’t pick up a book if the sentences are too short.

    Reply
  68. I have been an Austen fan since childhood, and like the character in “you’ve got mail” I have probably read Pride and Prejudice 200 times. (or at least 100 times) But, I haven’t been an Austen researcher, so thanks for the tidbits of writing and the info about the Morgan library. I think my reading of romance is related to wishing I had more Jane Austen to read. I primarily read romances set in Regency ( and Georgian) England and I am looking for a certain kind of voice– I don’t pick up a book if the sentences are too short.

    Reply
  69. I have been an Austen fan since childhood, and like the character in “you’ve got mail” I have probably read Pride and Prejudice 200 times. (or at least 100 times) But, I haven’t been an Austen researcher, so thanks for the tidbits of writing and the info about the Morgan library. I think my reading of romance is related to wishing I had more Jane Austen to read. I primarily read romances set in Regency ( and Georgian) England and I am looking for a certain kind of voice– I don’t pick up a book if the sentences are too short.

    Reply
  70. I have been an Austen fan since childhood, and like the character in “you’ve got mail” I have probably read Pride and Prejudice 200 times. (or at least 100 times) But, I haven’t been an Austen researcher, so thanks for the tidbits of writing and the info about the Morgan library. I think my reading of romance is related to wishing I had more Jane Austen to read. I primarily read romances set in Regency ( and Georgian) England and I am looking for a certain kind of voice– I don’t pick up a book if the sentences are too short.

    Reply
  71. Where plate boundaries occur within continental lithosphere, deformation is spread out over a much larger area than the plate boundary itself. In the case of the San Andreas fault continental transform, many earthquakes occur away from the plate boundary and are related to strains developed within the broader zone of deformation caused by major irregularities in the fault trace(e.g. the “Big bend” region). The Northridge earthquake was associated with movement on a blind thrust within such a zone. Another example is the strongly oblique convergent plate boundary between the Arabian and Eurasian plates where it runs through the northwestern part of the Zagros mountains.

    Reply
  72. Where plate boundaries occur within continental lithosphere, deformation is spread out over a much larger area than the plate boundary itself. In the case of the San Andreas fault continental transform, many earthquakes occur away from the plate boundary and are related to strains developed within the broader zone of deformation caused by major irregularities in the fault trace(e.g. the “Big bend” region). The Northridge earthquake was associated with movement on a blind thrust within such a zone. Another example is the strongly oblique convergent plate boundary between the Arabian and Eurasian plates where it runs through the northwestern part of the Zagros mountains.

    Reply
  73. Where plate boundaries occur within continental lithosphere, deformation is spread out over a much larger area than the plate boundary itself. In the case of the San Andreas fault continental transform, many earthquakes occur away from the plate boundary and are related to strains developed within the broader zone of deformation caused by major irregularities in the fault trace(e.g. the “Big bend” region). The Northridge earthquake was associated with movement on a blind thrust within such a zone. Another example is the strongly oblique convergent plate boundary between the Arabian and Eurasian plates where it runs through the northwestern part of the Zagros mountains.

    Reply
  74. Where plate boundaries occur within continental lithosphere, deformation is spread out over a much larger area than the plate boundary itself. In the case of the San Andreas fault continental transform, many earthquakes occur away from the plate boundary and are related to strains developed within the broader zone of deformation caused by major irregularities in the fault trace(e.g. the “Big bend” region). The Northridge earthquake was associated with movement on a blind thrust within such a zone. Another example is the strongly oblique convergent plate boundary between the Arabian and Eurasian plates where it runs through the northwestern part of the Zagros mountains.

    Reply
  75. Where plate boundaries occur within continental lithosphere, deformation is spread out over a much larger area than the plate boundary itself. In the case of the San Andreas fault continental transform, many earthquakes occur away from the plate boundary and are related to strains developed within the broader zone of deformation caused by major irregularities in the fault trace(e.g. the “Big bend” region). The Northridge earthquake was associated with movement on a blind thrust within such a zone. Another example is the strongly oblique convergent plate boundary between the Arabian and Eurasian plates where it runs through the northwestern part of the Zagros mountains.

    Reply

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