A leisurely walk to a monastery

Here's Jo, in England, reporting on a touch of history.

We're down south again at the moment, but we've spent a few days in the north, finding a home. Mission accomplished. We'll move into a house in Whitby on October 2nd.

However, we were staying in the old town of Barnard Castle, so named because it had/has a castle of that name. The castle, like most, is a ruin. There's still quite a bit of it, but this is the remains of a tower which gives an idea of the stairs that once spiraled up it.

IMG_3818 It's very much part of the town, and one day we walked from our friend's house to the shops along the river and through the castle. My kind of ambience. In this picture you can see the bridge we walked over, the river, and the castle beyond.

IMG_3808

The river is the Tees, a major river than runs down to the industrial area called Teeside, but at Barnie, as the locals call it, it's a bucolic delight.







IMG_3807
So on to the monastery, which is Egglestone, which is a late 12th century Premonstratensian abbey.

Do you know what Premonstratensian means? I didn't. Because it seems like "monastery", I was trying to make it make sense in that context. Perhaps pre the dissolution of the monasteries? 

No, it's an order, like Cistercian and Franciscan. "The Order of Canons Regular of Prémontré, also known as the Premonstratensians, the Norbertines, or in Britain and Ireland as theWhite Canons (from the colour of their habit), are a Catholic religious order of canons regular founded at Prémontré near Laon in 1120 by Saint Norbert, who later became Archbishop of Magdeburg. Premonstratensians are designated by O.Praem (Ordo Praemonstratensis) following their name."
IMG_3869  Another ruin, of course, but there's a kind of beauty to it.

There were also some interesting details intact, such as this vaulted ceiling to what was presumably a kitchen.
IMG_3887




An interesting aspect of Egglestone is that after the dissolution, the monastery became a house. This wasn't unusual, resulting in some stately homes called Abbey, but in this case the result is still…. a ruin. I haven't been able to quickly discover why the house didn't continue to be a house.

Apparently the inhabitants decamped a few miles to Rokeby Park, a Palladian house that could well house one of my Georgian aristocrats.



Rokebyp
Or it could even be Stenby, the seat of Lord Wraybourne, who is, of course, the hero of my first book, Lord Wraybourne's Betrothed, which will be out again soon! Had to get that in.

In November, my first Georgian, My Lady Notorious, will be published in the UK, and I'll be doing a bit of touring for it, distances being less in England. Ports of call include Shaftesbury, Winchester, my home town of Morecambe, and my imminent home, Whitby!

I'll give more details later.

Oh, and one last picture — a good one of a stile, the wooden steps that provide a way through hedges and fences that foil animals but work for most people.
IMG_3912

So this blog has been a leisurely walk through places of interest and other matters.

Some questions, and a prize. A copy of Lord Wraybourne's Betrothed when I ha
ve any, which is not quite yet. I'll randomly pick a winner from among people who post a comment related to these questions.

The dissolution of the monasteries wasn't much fun. Nor were the religious persecutions of the Tudor times, both of Catholics or Protestants. So, does that explain why the period has never been particularly popular in romanceL But then, why is The Tudors such a hit?

On a different angle, how do you feel about mention of things like stiles and Palladian architecture in books? How much description do you like along with words that might be unfamiliar?

Or lastly, which do you think is a more romantic setting for a book — the north or the south of England?

Jo 🙂

 

205 thoughts on “A leisurely walk to a monastery”

  1. Sherrie, here.
    Jo, I’m drooling over your gorgeous pictures. We have some beautiful ruins here in the US, but nothing to match the antiquity or grandeur of England’s. Thank you so much for sharing them. I hope you continue to share more local pictures.
    I love when stiles and architecture and such things are mentioned in novels. They help set the place and tone. Many times, when a type of architecture or other detail interests me, I run to the dictionary for edification after first reading about it in a novel.
    As far as tales set in the north or south of England, I have no preference. I’ve never been to the UK, so I wouldn’t know the difference anyway. I do, however, enjoy stories where there is a house party, because it usually involves interesting bits about architecture, landscaping, folleys, fountains, the surrounding community and villages, and so forth.
    You included some nice bits of description and history in The Secret Wedding, though I confess my favorite part had to do with your fictitious fanged rabbits! *g*

    Reply
  2. Sherrie, here.
    Jo, I’m drooling over your gorgeous pictures. We have some beautiful ruins here in the US, but nothing to match the antiquity or grandeur of England’s. Thank you so much for sharing them. I hope you continue to share more local pictures.
    I love when stiles and architecture and such things are mentioned in novels. They help set the place and tone. Many times, when a type of architecture or other detail interests me, I run to the dictionary for edification after first reading about it in a novel.
    As far as tales set in the north or south of England, I have no preference. I’ve never been to the UK, so I wouldn’t know the difference anyway. I do, however, enjoy stories where there is a house party, because it usually involves interesting bits about architecture, landscaping, folleys, fountains, the surrounding community and villages, and so forth.
    You included some nice bits of description and history in The Secret Wedding, though I confess my favorite part had to do with your fictitious fanged rabbits! *g*

    Reply
  3. Sherrie, here.
    Jo, I’m drooling over your gorgeous pictures. We have some beautiful ruins here in the US, but nothing to match the antiquity or grandeur of England’s. Thank you so much for sharing them. I hope you continue to share more local pictures.
    I love when stiles and architecture and such things are mentioned in novels. They help set the place and tone. Many times, when a type of architecture or other detail interests me, I run to the dictionary for edification after first reading about it in a novel.
    As far as tales set in the north or south of England, I have no preference. I’ve never been to the UK, so I wouldn’t know the difference anyway. I do, however, enjoy stories where there is a house party, because it usually involves interesting bits about architecture, landscaping, folleys, fountains, the surrounding community and villages, and so forth.
    You included some nice bits of description and history in The Secret Wedding, though I confess my favorite part had to do with your fictitious fanged rabbits! *g*

    Reply
  4. Sherrie, here.
    Jo, I’m drooling over your gorgeous pictures. We have some beautiful ruins here in the US, but nothing to match the antiquity or grandeur of England’s. Thank you so much for sharing them. I hope you continue to share more local pictures.
    I love when stiles and architecture and such things are mentioned in novels. They help set the place and tone. Many times, when a type of architecture or other detail interests me, I run to the dictionary for edification after first reading about it in a novel.
    As far as tales set in the north or south of England, I have no preference. I’ve never been to the UK, so I wouldn’t know the difference anyway. I do, however, enjoy stories where there is a house party, because it usually involves interesting bits about architecture, landscaping, folleys, fountains, the surrounding community and villages, and so forth.
    You included some nice bits of description and history in The Secret Wedding, though I confess my favorite part had to do with your fictitious fanged rabbits! *g*

    Reply
  5. Sherrie, here.
    Jo, I’m drooling over your gorgeous pictures. We have some beautiful ruins here in the US, but nothing to match the antiquity or grandeur of England’s. Thank you so much for sharing them. I hope you continue to share more local pictures.
    I love when stiles and architecture and such things are mentioned in novels. They help set the place and tone. Many times, when a type of architecture or other detail interests me, I run to the dictionary for edification after first reading about it in a novel.
    As far as tales set in the north or south of England, I have no preference. I’ve never been to the UK, so I wouldn’t know the difference anyway. I do, however, enjoy stories where there is a house party, because it usually involves interesting bits about architecture, landscaping, folleys, fountains, the surrounding community and villages, and so forth.
    You included some nice bits of description and history in The Secret Wedding, though I confess my favorite part had to do with your fictitious fanged rabbits! *g*

    Reply
  6. As a northerner who also lived in Devon, I prefer the settings in the south. My memories of northern weather are not conducive to any outdoor pursuits whatsoever. Having said that, we spent many happy Octobers in Ravescar, just down the road from Jo’s new home. They were wonderful times – you must go there Jo. It’s a town that got planned, laid out and never built. Eerie streets with no houses and an imposing hotel on the edge of the cliffs.
    Personally I hate digressions of explanation. Like Sherrie, when I come across a term that I’m not familiar with, I look it up!

    Reply
  7. As a northerner who also lived in Devon, I prefer the settings in the south. My memories of northern weather are not conducive to any outdoor pursuits whatsoever. Having said that, we spent many happy Octobers in Ravescar, just down the road from Jo’s new home. They were wonderful times – you must go there Jo. It’s a town that got planned, laid out and never built. Eerie streets with no houses and an imposing hotel on the edge of the cliffs.
    Personally I hate digressions of explanation. Like Sherrie, when I come across a term that I’m not familiar with, I look it up!

    Reply
  8. As a northerner who also lived in Devon, I prefer the settings in the south. My memories of northern weather are not conducive to any outdoor pursuits whatsoever. Having said that, we spent many happy Octobers in Ravescar, just down the road from Jo’s new home. They were wonderful times – you must go there Jo. It’s a town that got planned, laid out and never built. Eerie streets with no houses and an imposing hotel on the edge of the cliffs.
    Personally I hate digressions of explanation. Like Sherrie, when I come across a term that I’m not familiar with, I look it up!

    Reply
  9. As a northerner who also lived in Devon, I prefer the settings in the south. My memories of northern weather are not conducive to any outdoor pursuits whatsoever. Having said that, we spent many happy Octobers in Ravescar, just down the road from Jo’s new home. They were wonderful times – you must go there Jo. It’s a town that got planned, laid out and never built. Eerie streets with no houses and an imposing hotel on the edge of the cliffs.
    Personally I hate digressions of explanation. Like Sherrie, when I come across a term that I’m not familiar with, I look it up!

    Reply
  10. As a northerner who also lived in Devon, I prefer the settings in the south. My memories of northern weather are not conducive to any outdoor pursuits whatsoever. Having said that, we spent many happy Octobers in Ravescar, just down the road from Jo’s new home. They were wonderful times – you must go there Jo. It’s a town that got planned, laid out and never built. Eerie streets with no houses and an imposing hotel on the edge of the cliffs.
    Personally I hate digressions of explanation. Like Sherrie, when I come across a term that I’m not familiar with, I look it up!

    Reply
  11. What a lovely place. I so want to retire so we can take our time and travel.
    As for the dissolution period and the Tudors, not a good time for romance unless you look at it from the point of survival. Danger, constant turmoil, your life being on the line due to your beliefs, all lead to a background for intense suspense and endangered love. A pretty good setting for romance, but not of a gentle natureed story.
    I like detail in my historical books. It is one of the reasons I read historicals. Introduction of new terms doesn’t hurt. If I want to know more or need clarification, I will look it up. It is the little details of everyday life that make a story richer.
    Since I haven’t been there, I’m not sure which is a better locale. If in the north, you do have the proximity of Scotland which adds all sorts of plot possibilities and story lines.
    Good luck with your new home. A move is always an adventure.

    Reply
  12. What a lovely place. I so want to retire so we can take our time and travel.
    As for the dissolution period and the Tudors, not a good time for romance unless you look at it from the point of survival. Danger, constant turmoil, your life being on the line due to your beliefs, all lead to a background for intense suspense and endangered love. A pretty good setting for romance, but not of a gentle natureed story.
    I like detail in my historical books. It is one of the reasons I read historicals. Introduction of new terms doesn’t hurt. If I want to know more or need clarification, I will look it up. It is the little details of everyday life that make a story richer.
    Since I haven’t been there, I’m not sure which is a better locale. If in the north, you do have the proximity of Scotland which adds all sorts of plot possibilities and story lines.
    Good luck with your new home. A move is always an adventure.

    Reply
  13. What a lovely place. I so want to retire so we can take our time and travel.
    As for the dissolution period and the Tudors, not a good time for romance unless you look at it from the point of survival. Danger, constant turmoil, your life being on the line due to your beliefs, all lead to a background for intense suspense and endangered love. A pretty good setting for romance, but not of a gentle natureed story.
    I like detail in my historical books. It is one of the reasons I read historicals. Introduction of new terms doesn’t hurt. If I want to know more or need clarification, I will look it up. It is the little details of everyday life that make a story richer.
    Since I haven’t been there, I’m not sure which is a better locale. If in the north, you do have the proximity of Scotland which adds all sorts of plot possibilities and story lines.
    Good luck with your new home. A move is always an adventure.

    Reply
  14. What a lovely place. I so want to retire so we can take our time and travel.
    As for the dissolution period and the Tudors, not a good time for romance unless you look at it from the point of survival. Danger, constant turmoil, your life being on the line due to your beliefs, all lead to a background for intense suspense and endangered love. A pretty good setting for romance, but not of a gentle natureed story.
    I like detail in my historical books. It is one of the reasons I read historicals. Introduction of new terms doesn’t hurt. If I want to know more or need clarification, I will look it up. It is the little details of everyday life that make a story richer.
    Since I haven’t been there, I’m not sure which is a better locale. If in the north, you do have the proximity of Scotland which adds all sorts of plot possibilities and story lines.
    Good luck with your new home. A move is always an adventure.

    Reply
  15. What a lovely place. I so want to retire so we can take our time and travel.
    As for the dissolution period and the Tudors, not a good time for romance unless you look at it from the point of survival. Danger, constant turmoil, your life being on the line due to your beliefs, all lead to a background for intense suspense and endangered love. A pretty good setting for romance, but not of a gentle natureed story.
    I like detail in my historical books. It is one of the reasons I read historicals. Introduction of new terms doesn’t hurt. If I want to know more or need clarification, I will look it up. It is the little details of everyday life that make a story richer.
    Since I haven’t been there, I’m not sure which is a better locale. If in the north, you do have the proximity of Scotland which adds all sorts of plot possibilities and story lines.
    Good luck with your new home. A move is always an adventure.

    Reply
  16. I like details such as Palladium and stile. If I don;t know what something means I look it up. Make my journey to the time of the book that much more realistic. Ken Follett in his “Rebels Of Ireland” seemed to use a lot of detail to good advantage. North or South? Both seem equal to me in terms of which location would make a great novel – just different characters and issues. Thanks for a wonderful photographic tour of some parts of England that I would love to make it o one day before I check out.

    Reply
  17. I like details such as Palladium and stile. If I don;t know what something means I look it up. Make my journey to the time of the book that much more realistic. Ken Follett in his “Rebels Of Ireland” seemed to use a lot of detail to good advantage. North or South? Both seem equal to me in terms of which location would make a great novel – just different characters and issues. Thanks for a wonderful photographic tour of some parts of England that I would love to make it o one day before I check out.

    Reply
  18. I like details such as Palladium and stile. If I don;t know what something means I look it up. Make my journey to the time of the book that much more realistic. Ken Follett in his “Rebels Of Ireland” seemed to use a lot of detail to good advantage. North or South? Both seem equal to me in terms of which location would make a great novel – just different characters and issues. Thanks for a wonderful photographic tour of some parts of England that I would love to make it o one day before I check out.

    Reply
  19. I like details such as Palladium and stile. If I don;t know what something means I look it up. Make my journey to the time of the book that much more realistic. Ken Follett in his “Rebels Of Ireland” seemed to use a lot of detail to good advantage. North or South? Both seem equal to me in terms of which location would make a great novel – just different characters and issues. Thanks for a wonderful photographic tour of some parts of England that I would love to make it o one day before I check out.

    Reply
  20. I like details such as Palladium and stile. If I don;t know what something means I look it up. Make my journey to the time of the book that much more realistic. Ken Follett in his “Rebels Of Ireland” seemed to use a lot of detail to good advantage. North or South? Both seem equal to me in terms of which location would make a great novel – just different characters and issues. Thanks for a wonderful photographic tour of some parts of England that I would love to make it o one day before I check out.

    Reply
  21. Whitby! How lovely! Dracula and the Whitby Witches by Robin Jarvis are the first things to spring to mind, now you will add even more to Whitby’s literary reputation.
    I was born in Yorkshire and love it, but I think a writer could make any place romantic through her story, however unpromising.
    Don’t forget to visit the Bowes Museum while you’re in Barnard Castle, and plan your visit around the time they play the silver swan. I’ve only seen it once in my life, and it was wonderful.

    Reply
  22. Whitby! How lovely! Dracula and the Whitby Witches by Robin Jarvis are the first things to spring to mind, now you will add even more to Whitby’s literary reputation.
    I was born in Yorkshire and love it, but I think a writer could make any place romantic through her story, however unpromising.
    Don’t forget to visit the Bowes Museum while you’re in Barnard Castle, and plan your visit around the time they play the silver swan. I’ve only seen it once in my life, and it was wonderful.

    Reply
  23. Whitby! How lovely! Dracula and the Whitby Witches by Robin Jarvis are the first things to spring to mind, now you will add even more to Whitby’s literary reputation.
    I was born in Yorkshire and love it, but I think a writer could make any place romantic through her story, however unpromising.
    Don’t forget to visit the Bowes Museum while you’re in Barnard Castle, and plan your visit around the time they play the silver swan. I’ve only seen it once in my life, and it was wonderful.

    Reply
  24. Whitby! How lovely! Dracula and the Whitby Witches by Robin Jarvis are the first things to spring to mind, now you will add even more to Whitby’s literary reputation.
    I was born in Yorkshire and love it, but I think a writer could make any place romantic through her story, however unpromising.
    Don’t forget to visit the Bowes Museum while you’re in Barnard Castle, and plan your visit around the time they play the silver swan. I’ve only seen it once in my life, and it was wonderful.

    Reply
  25. Whitby! How lovely! Dracula and the Whitby Witches by Robin Jarvis are the first things to spring to mind, now you will add even more to Whitby’s literary reputation.
    I was born in Yorkshire and love it, but I think a writer could make any place romantic through her story, however unpromising.
    Don’t forget to visit the Bowes Museum while you’re in Barnard Castle, and plan your visit around the time they play the silver swan. I’ve only seen it once in my life, and it was wonderful.

    Reply
  26. I am looking forward to Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed being republished. Actually I look forward to each and everyone of you books that have been published, will be published. I am keeping a file in Excell of all the books I have reaf and all I haven’t read.
    Thank you for all my pleasant reading time I have racked up in the last year.
    Cheers Kathy from Down Under

    Reply
  27. I am looking forward to Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed being republished. Actually I look forward to each and everyone of you books that have been published, will be published. I am keeping a file in Excell of all the books I have reaf and all I haven’t read.
    Thank you for all my pleasant reading time I have racked up in the last year.
    Cheers Kathy from Down Under

    Reply
  28. I am looking forward to Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed being republished. Actually I look forward to each and everyone of you books that have been published, will be published. I am keeping a file in Excell of all the books I have reaf and all I haven’t read.
    Thank you for all my pleasant reading time I have racked up in the last year.
    Cheers Kathy from Down Under

    Reply
  29. I am looking forward to Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed being republished. Actually I look forward to each and everyone of you books that have been published, will be published. I am keeping a file in Excell of all the books I have reaf and all I haven’t read.
    Thank you for all my pleasant reading time I have racked up in the last year.
    Cheers Kathy from Down Under

    Reply
  30. I am looking forward to Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed being republished. Actually I look forward to each and everyone of you books that have been published, will be published. I am keeping a file in Excell of all the books I have reaf and all I haven’t read.
    Thank you for all my pleasant reading time I have racked up in the last year.
    Cheers Kathy from Down Under

    Reply
  31. I like learning new things. What’s the point of reading if you don’t learn new things? I love detail (historical/cultural/local) in books, it’s what transports me away from my daily life. (That, and the story.) If I can’t infer meaning and it bothers me, I’ll look it up. With the internet at my fingertips, it doesn’t even disrupt my reading for long. So please don’t start writing to the lowest common denominator. That will just lower the lowest common denominator…
    North, south, whatever, it doesn’t matter to me. Not as long as you tell me what is special/different/unique about the location, or if it could be Anywhere, England. Does it smell of a sea breeze or an open cesspool, is the area polluted by nearby industry or is it untouched countryside?
    (Opinionated much? :-D)

    Reply
  32. I like learning new things. What’s the point of reading if you don’t learn new things? I love detail (historical/cultural/local) in books, it’s what transports me away from my daily life. (That, and the story.) If I can’t infer meaning and it bothers me, I’ll look it up. With the internet at my fingertips, it doesn’t even disrupt my reading for long. So please don’t start writing to the lowest common denominator. That will just lower the lowest common denominator…
    North, south, whatever, it doesn’t matter to me. Not as long as you tell me what is special/different/unique about the location, or if it could be Anywhere, England. Does it smell of a sea breeze or an open cesspool, is the area polluted by nearby industry or is it untouched countryside?
    (Opinionated much? :-D)

    Reply
  33. I like learning new things. What’s the point of reading if you don’t learn new things? I love detail (historical/cultural/local) in books, it’s what transports me away from my daily life. (That, and the story.) If I can’t infer meaning and it bothers me, I’ll look it up. With the internet at my fingertips, it doesn’t even disrupt my reading for long. So please don’t start writing to the lowest common denominator. That will just lower the lowest common denominator…
    North, south, whatever, it doesn’t matter to me. Not as long as you tell me what is special/different/unique about the location, or if it could be Anywhere, England. Does it smell of a sea breeze or an open cesspool, is the area polluted by nearby industry or is it untouched countryside?
    (Opinionated much? :-D)

    Reply
  34. I like learning new things. What’s the point of reading if you don’t learn new things? I love detail (historical/cultural/local) in books, it’s what transports me away from my daily life. (That, and the story.) If I can’t infer meaning and it bothers me, I’ll look it up. With the internet at my fingertips, it doesn’t even disrupt my reading for long. So please don’t start writing to the lowest common denominator. That will just lower the lowest common denominator…
    North, south, whatever, it doesn’t matter to me. Not as long as you tell me what is special/different/unique about the location, or if it could be Anywhere, England. Does it smell of a sea breeze or an open cesspool, is the area polluted by nearby industry or is it untouched countryside?
    (Opinionated much? :-D)

    Reply
  35. I like learning new things. What’s the point of reading if you don’t learn new things? I love detail (historical/cultural/local) in books, it’s what transports me away from my daily life. (That, and the story.) If I can’t infer meaning and it bothers me, I’ll look it up. With the internet at my fingertips, it doesn’t even disrupt my reading for long. So please don’t start writing to the lowest common denominator. That will just lower the lowest common denominator…
    North, south, whatever, it doesn’t matter to me. Not as long as you tell me what is special/different/unique about the location, or if it could be Anywhere, England. Does it smell of a sea breeze or an open cesspool, is the area polluted by nearby industry or is it untouched countryside?
    (Opinionated much? :-D)

    Reply
  36. I love visiting ruins – they seem so much more atmospheric. Having said that, I went to Powderham Castle, near Exeter, yesterday, which has been the family home of the Courtenays (now the Earls of Devon) since the early 14th Century (and they still live there), and that was lovely. Especially the intact deer park.
    I think with the Tudor times there was so much going on – losing the last French lands, religious conflict, wives, the bastardisation of the daughters who then became queen, the quick change of succession, dissolution, fiscal troubles and so on – that it can’t be easy to set a romance amidst all that without also including a history essay. For myself, I’ve studied the period to death and cannot read any fiction on it. I can’t even watch the Tudors – Rhys-Meyers is too young! Not to mention not a redhead. Yes, he smoulders beautifully, but I can’t see him ever getting fat *grumbles*
    As for North vs South, can’t say I’m bothered either way. They each have their merits and plenty of beauty.

    Reply
  37. I love visiting ruins – they seem so much more atmospheric. Having said that, I went to Powderham Castle, near Exeter, yesterday, which has been the family home of the Courtenays (now the Earls of Devon) since the early 14th Century (and they still live there), and that was lovely. Especially the intact deer park.
    I think with the Tudor times there was so much going on – losing the last French lands, religious conflict, wives, the bastardisation of the daughters who then became queen, the quick change of succession, dissolution, fiscal troubles and so on – that it can’t be easy to set a romance amidst all that without also including a history essay. For myself, I’ve studied the period to death and cannot read any fiction on it. I can’t even watch the Tudors – Rhys-Meyers is too young! Not to mention not a redhead. Yes, he smoulders beautifully, but I can’t see him ever getting fat *grumbles*
    As for North vs South, can’t say I’m bothered either way. They each have their merits and plenty of beauty.

    Reply
  38. I love visiting ruins – they seem so much more atmospheric. Having said that, I went to Powderham Castle, near Exeter, yesterday, which has been the family home of the Courtenays (now the Earls of Devon) since the early 14th Century (and they still live there), and that was lovely. Especially the intact deer park.
    I think with the Tudor times there was so much going on – losing the last French lands, religious conflict, wives, the bastardisation of the daughters who then became queen, the quick change of succession, dissolution, fiscal troubles and so on – that it can’t be easy to set a romance amidst all that without also including a history essay. For myself, I’ve studied the period to death and cannot read any fiction on it. I can’t even watch the Tudors – Rhys-Meyers is too young! Not to mention not a redhead. Yes, he smoulders beautifully, but I can’t see him ever getting fat *grumbles*
    As for North vs South, can’t say I’m bothered either way. They each have their merits and plenty of beauty.

    Reply
  39. I love visiting ruins – they seem so much more atmospheric. Having said that, I went to Powderham Castle, near Exeter, yesterday, which has been the family home of the Courtenays (now the Earls of Devon) since the early 14th Century (and they still live there), and that was lovely. Especially the intact deer park.
    I think with the Tudor times there was so much going on – losing the last French lands, religious conflict, wives, the bastardisation of the daughters who then became queen, the quick change of succession, dissolution, fiscal troubles and so on – that it can’t be easy to set a romance amidst all that without also including a history essay. For myself, I’ve studied the period to death and cannot read any fiction on it. I can’t even watch the Tudors – Rhys-Meyers is too young! Not to mention not a redhead. Yes, he smoulders beautifully, but I can’t see him ever getting fat *grumbles*
    As for North vs South, can’t say I’m bothered either way. They each have their merits and plenty of beauty.

    Reply
  40. I love visiting ruins – they seem so much more atmospheric. Having said that, I went to Powderham Castle, near Exeter, yesterday, which has been the family home of the Courtenays (now the Earls of Devon) since the early 14th Century (and they still live there), and that was lovely. Especially the intact deer park.
    I think with the Tudor times there was so much going on – losing the last French lands, religious conflict, wives, the bastardisation of the daughters who then became queen, the quick change of succession, dissolution, fiscal troubles and so on – that it can’t be easy to set a romance amidst all that without also including a history essay. For myself, I’ve studied the period to death and cannot read any fiction on it. I can’t even watch the Tudors – Rhys-Meyers is too young! Not to mention not a redhead. Yes, he smoulders beautifully, but I can’t see him ever getting fat *grumbles*
    As for North vs South, can’t say I’m bothered either way. They each have their merits and plenty of beauty.

    Reply
  41. I had never seen a stile and it’s interesting to see how it’s set up. I enjoyed your post and pictures very much. It’s always interesting to see how people lived so many years ago and I do like descriptions in the stories so I can imagine the setting. I have never seen the series The Tudors but I wonder if it is true to life. I don’t have a preference for the setting of a story in England. I think a good story can be set anywhere

    Reply
  42. I had never seen a stile and it’s interesting to see how it’s set up. I enjoyed your post and pictures very much. It’s always interesting to see how people lived so many years ago and I do like descriptions in the stories so I can imagine the setting. I have never seen the series The Tudors but I wonder if it is true to life. I don’t have a preference for the setting of a story in England. I think a good story can be set anywhere

    Reply
  43. I had never seen a stile and it’s interesting to see how it’s set up. I enjoyed your post and pictures very much. It’s always interesting to see how people lived so many years ago and I do like descriptions in the stories so I can imagine the setting. I have never seen the series The Tudors but I wonder if it is true to life. I don’t have a preference for the setting of a story in England. I think a good story can be set anywhere

    Reply
  44. I had never seen a stile and it’s interesting to see how it’s set up. I enjoyed your post and pictures very much. It’s always interesting to see how people lived so many years ago and I do like descriptions in the stories so I can imagine the setting. I have never seen the series The Tudors but I wonder if it is true to life. I don’t have a preference for the setting of a story in England. I think a good story can be set anywhere

    Reply
  45. I had never seen a stile and it’s interesting to see how it’s set up. I enjoyed your post and pictures very much. It’s always interesting to see how people lived so many years ago and I do like descriptions in the stories so I can imagine the setting. I have never seen the series The Tudors but I wonder if it is true to life. I don’t have a preference for the setting of a story in England. I think a good story can be set anywhere

    Reply
  46. An English North or South location hardly matters when it’s the author’s descriptive prose that makes a location romantic or not.
    Detailed descriptions of locations sets the scene and leads the minds eye to visualize the ‘historical’ part of the story.
    The Tudors is such a hit because of the glamorization of a perceived time period. People are entertained and mesmerized by the costumes, background music, sex, dialog, and attractive actors.

    Reply
  47. An English North or South location hardly matters when it’s the author’s descriptive prose that makes a location romantic or not.
    Detailed descriptions of locations sets the scene and leads the minds eye to visualize the ‘historical’ part of the story.
    The Tudors is such a hit because of the glamorization of a perceived time period. People are entertained and mesmerized by the costumes, background music, sex, dialog, and attractive actors.

    Reply
  48. An English North or South location hardly matters when it’s the author’s descriptive prose that makes a location romantic or not.
    Detailed descriptions of locations sets the scene and leads the minds eye to visualize the ‘historical’ part of the story.
    The Tudors is such a hit because of the glamorization of a perceived time period. People are entertained and mesmerized by the costumes, background music, sex, dialog, and attractive actors.

    Reply
  49. An English North or South location hardly matters when it’s the author’s descriptive prose that makes a location romantic or not.
    Detailed descriptions of locations sets the scene and leads the minds eye to visualize the ‘historical’ part of the story.
    The Tudors is such a hit because of the glamorization of a perceived time period. People are entertained and mesmerized by the costumes, background music, sex, dialog, and attractive actors.

    Reply
  50. An English North or South location hardly matters when it’s the author’s descriptive prose that makes a location romantic or not.
    Detailed descriptions of locations sets the scene and leads the minds eye to visualize the ‘historical’ part of the story.
    The Tudors is such a hit because of the glamorization of a perceived time period. People are entertained and mesmerized by the costumes, background music, sex, dialog, and attractive actors.

    Reply
  51. I love hearing about the architecture and history etc. when I read Jo’s books. And I can’t wait for LWB. Congratulations on finding a new home! Best wishes from VT, USA.

    Reply
  52. I love hearing about the architecture and history etc. when I read Jo’s books. And I can’t wait for LWB. Congratulations on finding a new home! Best wishes from VT, USA.

    Reply
  53. I love hearing about the architecture and history etc. when I read Jo’s books. And I can’t wait for LWB. Congratulations on finding a new home! Best wishes from VT, USA.

    Reply
  54. I love hearing about the architecture and history etc. when I read Jo’s books. And I can’t wait for LWB. Congratulations on finding a new home! Best wishes from VT, USA.

    Reply
  55. I love hearing about the architecture and history etc. when I read Jo’s books. And I can’t wait for LWB. Congratulations on finding a new home! Best wishes from VT, USA.

    Reply
  56. Barnard Castle is a lovely town.
    I hope you managed to visit the Bowes Museum. If not, try on your next visit.
    Living in Whitby will allow you to explore North East England and the Scottish Borders. Wonderful country. Also, everything and everywhere is within easy reach. Distances are much reduced compared with North America.
    I live in a suburb of Glasgow, a wonderful city on the west side of Scotland. We can be out of the city and into the country within 20 minutes.

    Reply
  57. Barnard Castle is a lovely town.
    I hope you managed to visit the Bowes Museum. If not, try on your next visit.
    Living in Whitby will allow you to explore North East England and the Scottish Borders. Wonderful country. Also, everything and everywhere is within easy reach. Distances are much reduced compared with North America.
    I live in a suburb of Glasgow, a wonderful city on the west side of Scotland. We can be out of the city and into the country within 20 minutes.

    Reply
  58. Barnard Castle is a lovely town.
    I hope you managed to visit the Bowes Museum. If not, try on your next visit.
    Living in Whitby will allow you to explore North East England and the Scottish Borders. Wonderful country. Also, everything and everywhere is within easy reach. Distances are much reduced compared with North America.
    I live in a suburb of Glasgow, a wonderful city on the west side of Scotland. We can be out of the city and into the country within 20 minutes.

    Reply
  59. Barnard Castle is a lovely town.
    I hope you managed to visit the Bowes Museum. If not, try on your next visit.
    Living in Whitby will allow you to explore North East England and the Scottish Borders. Wonderful country. Also, everything and everywhere is within easy reach. Distances are much reduced compared with North America.
    I live in a suburb of Glasgow, a wonderful city on the west side of Scotland. We can be out of the city and into the country within 20 minutes.

    Reply
  60. Barnard Castle is a lovely town.
    I hope you managed to visit the Bowes Museum. If not, try on your next visit.
    Living in Whitby will allow you to explore North East England and the Scottish Borders. Wonderful country. Also, everything and everywhere is within easy reach. Distances are much reduced compared with North America.
    I live in a suburb of Glasgow, a wonderful city on the west side of Scotland. We can be out of the city and into the country within 20 minutes.

    Reply
  61. Ah the Tudors… when I was an impressionable teenager I fell in love with the Tudors, mostly due to Keith Michell’s performance. I read everything I could on Henry and his 6 wives. Jean Plaidy wrote great books are that set in the period and more recently so did Jane Feather. I think that it is difficult to see Henry as a romantic figure because he was a terribly flawed human being and the image of the fat, greedy leecher is the one that is best known. And I agree, the current series the Tudors is awful. So was The Other Boylen Girl… I’ll take Keith Michell over Rhys and Eric Bana anyday. 🙂

    Reply
  62. Ah the Tudors… when I was an impressionable teenager I fell in love with the Tudors, mostly due to Keith Michell’s performance. I read everything I could on Henry and his 6 wives. Jean Plaidy wrote great books are that set in the period and more recently so did Jane Feather. I think that it is difficult to see Henry as a romantic figure because he was a terribly flawed human being and the image of the fat, greedy leecher is the one that is best known. And I agree, the current series the Tudors is awful. So was The Other Boylen Girl… I’ll take Keith Michell over Rhys and Eric Bana anyday. 🙂

    Reply
  63. Ah the Tudors… when I was an impressionable teenager I fell in love with the Tudors, mostly due to Keith Michell’s performance. I read everything I could on Henry and his 6 wives. Jean Plaidy wrote great books are that set in the period and more recently so did Jane Feather. I think that it is difficult to see Henry as a romantic figure because he was a terribly flawed human being and the image of the fat, greedy leecher is the one that is best known. And I agree, the current series the Tudors is awful. So was The Other Boylen Girl… I’ll take Keith Michell over Rhys and Eric Bana anyday. 🙂

    Reply
  64. Ah the Tudors… when I was an impressionable teenager I fell in love with the Tudors, mostly due to Keith Michell’s performance. I read everything I could on Henry and his 6 wives. Jean Plaidy wrote great books are that set in the period and more recently so did Jane Feather. I think that it is difficult to see Henry as a romantic figure because he was a terribly flawed human being and the image of the fat, greedy leecher is the one that is best known. And I agree, the current series the Tudors is awful. So was The Other Boylen Girl… I’ll take Keith Michell over Rhys and Eric Bana anyday. 🙂

    Reply
  65. Ah the Tudors… when I was an impressionable teenager I fell in love with the Tudors, mostly due to Keith Michell’s performance. I read everything I could on Henry and his 6 wives. Jean Plaidy wrote great books are that set in the period and more recently so did Jane Feather. I think that it is difficult to see Henry as a romantic figure because he was a terribly flawed human being and the image of the fat, greedy leecher is the one that is best known. And I agree, the current series the Tudors is awful. So was The Other Boylen Girl… I’ll take Keith Michell over Rhys and Eric Bana anyday. 🙂

    Reply
  66. North or South. well it doesn’t make much difference to me. It just gets to me when they are set in Northumberland, and they can get to London in 2 days??/!!it is the H/H that matter and of course a good story..
    There are a lot of Manor houses and castles and ruins in the UK, we visited them a lot when we lived there.
    The Tudors etc. I haven’t watched this series as I am usually reading. but as a historical fact. it was quite a change for the way of life in England. Looking at the pictures makes me want to visit again. Joan

    Reply
  67. North or South. well it doesn’t make much difference to me. It just gets to me when they are set in Northumberland, and they can get to London in 2 days??/!!it is the H/H that matter and of course a good story..
    There are a lot of Manor houses and castles and ruins in the UK, we visited them a lot when we lived there.
    The Tudors etc. I haven’t watched this series as I am usually reading. but as a historical fact. it was quite a change for the way of life in England. Looking at the pictures makes me want to visit again. Joan

    Reply
  68. North or South. well it doesn’t make much difference to me. It just gets to me when they are set in Northumberland, and they can get to London in 2 days??/!!it is the H/H that matter and of course a good story..
    There are a lot of Manor houses and castles and ruins in the UK, we visited them a lot when we lived there.
    The Tudors etc. I haven’t watched this series as I am usually reading. but as a historical fact. it was quite a change for the way of life in England. Looking at the pictures makes me want to visit again. Joan

    Reply
  69. North or South. well it doesn’t make much difference to me. It just gets to me when they are set in Northumberland, and they can get to London in 2 days??/!!it is the H/H that matter and of course a good story..
    There are a lot of Manor houses and castles and ruins in the UK, we visited them a lot when we lived there.
    The Tudors etc. I haven’t watched this series as I am usually reading. but as a historical fact. it was quite a change for the way of life in England. Looking at the pictures makes me want to visit again. Joan

    Reply
  70. North or South. well it doesn’t make much difference to me. It just gets to me when they are set in Northumberland, and they can get to London in 2 days??/!!it is the H/H that matter and of course a good story..
    There are a lot of Manor houses and castles and ruins in the UK, we visited them a lot when we lived there.
    The Tudors etc. I haven’t watched this series as I am usually reading. but as a historical fact. it was quite a change for the way of life in England. Looking at the pictures makes me want to visit again. Joan

    Reply
  71. Hi everyone. Just back from picking up the new car. Always scary.
    Yes, I’ve been to the Bowes Museum a number of times, and seen the swan. It inspired Rothgar’s interest in automata. 🙂
    I want to get into the library, but it used to be open only on Thursdays, which never synced with a brief visit. There’s big renovations going on there and I gather they’re enlarging the library and it’ll be open all the time. So soon.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  72. Hi everyone. Just back from picking up the new car. Always scary.
    Yes, I’ve been to the Bowes Museum a number of times, and seen the swan. It inspired Rothgar’s interest in automata. 🙂
    I want to get into the library, but it used to be open only on Thursdays, which never synced with a brief visit. There’s big renovations going on there and I gather they’re enlarging the library and it’ll be open all the time. So soon.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  73. Hi everyone. Just back from picking up the new car. Always scary.
    Yes, I’ve been to the Bowes Museum a number of times, and seen the swan. It inspired Rothgar’s interest in automata. 🙂
    I want to get into the library, but it used to be open only on Thursdays, which never synced with a brief visit. There’s big renovations going on there and I gather they’re enlarging the library and it’ll be open all the time. So soon.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  74. Hi everyone. Just back from picking up the new car. Always scary.
    Yes, I’ve been to the Bowes Museum a number of times, and seen the swan. It inspired Rothgar’s interest in automata. 🙂
    I want to get into the library, but it used to be open only on Thursdays, which never synced with a brief visit. There’s big renovations going on there and I gather they’re enlarging the library and it’ll be open all the time. So soon.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  75. Hi everyone. Just back from picking up the new car. Always scary.
    Yes, I’ve been to the Bowes Museum a number of times, and seen the swan. It inspired Rothgar’s interest in automata. 🙂
    I want to get into the library, but it used to be open only on Thursdays, which never synced with a brief visit. There’s big renovations going on there and I gather they’re enlarging the library and it’ll be open all the time. So soon.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  76. North or South? That’s a cruel question, Mary Jo 🙂 I don’t think I could tip the scale one way or the other.
    I’ve traveled extensively through the north, having lived in Leeds for a bit, but have also made some forays into the south – mainly through Dorset, Devon, Somerset and Cornwall. Gorgeous country all.
    Most of England is well-suited for romance – at least I think so. Rolling hills, ragged cliffs and clear blue seas provide ample fodder for a little romance.
    Ranking the highest in my opinion would be the scenery found in the walk between Sennen Cove and Land’s End in Cornwall, the area around Bamburgh Castle in Northumberland and the Yorkshire Dales and Moors (of course), especially around Malham Cove.
    Sigh, now I’m going to have to go back and look at some pics.

    Reply
  77. North or South? That’s a cruel question, Mary Jo 🙂 I don’t think I could tip the scale one way or the other.
    I’ve traveled extensively through the north, having lived in Leeds for a bit, but have also made some forays into the south – mainly through Dorset, Devon, Somerset and Cornwall. Gorgeous country all.
    Most of England is well-suited for romance – at least I think so. Rolling hills, ragged cliffs and clear blue seas provide ample fodder for a little romance.
    Ranking the highest in my opinion would be the scenery found in the walk between Sennen Cove and Land’s End in Cornwall, the area around Bamburgh Castle in Northumberland and the Yorkshire Dales and Moors (of course), especially around Malham Cove.
    Sigh, now I’m going to have to go back and look at some pics.

    Reply
  78. North or South? That’s a cruel question, Mary Jo 🙂 I don’t think I could tip the scale one way or the other.
    I’ve traveled extensively through the north, having lived in Leeds for a bit, but have also made some forays into the south – mainly through Dorset, Devon, Somerset and Cornwall. Gorgeous country all.
    Most of England is well-suited for romance – at least I think so. Rolling hills, ragged cliffs and clear blue seas provide ample fodder for a little romance.
    Ranking the highest in my opinion would be the scenery found in the walk between Sennen Cove and Land’s End in Cornwall, the area around Bamburgh Castle in Northumberland and the Yorkshire Dales and Moors (of course), especially around Malham Cove.
    Sigh, now I’m going to have to go back and look at some pics.

    Reply
  79. North or South? That’s a cruel question, Mary Jo 🙂 I don’t think I could tip the scale one way or the other.
    I’ve traveled extensively through the north, having lived in Leeds for a bit, but have also made some forays into the south – mainly through Dorset, Devon, Somerset and Cornwall. Gorgeous country all.
    Most of England is well-suited for romance – at least I think so. Rolling hills, ragged cliffs and clear blue seas provide ample fodder for a little romance.
    Ranking the highest in my opinion would be the scenery found in the walk between Sennen Cove and Land’s End in Cornwall, the area around Bamburgh Castle in Northumberland and the Yorkshire Dales and Moors (of course), especially around Malham Cove.
    Sigh, now I’m going to have to go back and look at some pics.

    Reply
  80. North or South? That’s a cruel question, Mary Jo 🙂 I don’t think I could tip the scale one way or the other.
    I’ve traveled extensively through the north, having lived in Leeds for a bit, but have also made some forays into the south – mainly through Dorset, Devon, Somerset and Cornwall. Gorgeous country all.
    Most of England is well-suited for romance – at least I think so. Rolling hills, ragged cliffs and clear blue seas provide ample fodder for a little romance.
    Ranking the highest in my opinion would be the scenery found in the walk between Sennen Cove and Land’s End in Cornwall, the area around Bamburgh Castle in Northumberland and the Yorkshire Dales and Moors (of course), especially around Malham Cove.
    Sigh, now I’m going to have to go back and look at some pics.

    Reply
  81. I was never interested in books located in UK until my neice moved to England and now the books gives me insights for places very unknown to me.England is full of wonderful areas to be placed in books. I think Tudor style was a hit because it offered a chance to get into a part where so many had no idea what to expect. The love of details about the architecture adds alot to a story and puts the reader in another part of the world. I would not know the difference between north or south of England so I feel to me the story could be from either.

    Reply
  82. I was never interested in books located in UK until my neice moved to England and now the books gives me insights for places very unknown to me.England is full of wonderful areas to be placed in books. I think Tudor style was a hit because it offered a chance to get into a part where so many had no idea what to expect. The love of details about the architecture adds alot to a story and puts the reader in another part of the world. I would not know the difference between north or south of England so I feel to me the story could be from either.

    Reply
  83. I was never interested in books located in UK until my neice moved to England and now the books gives me insights for places very unknown to me.England is full of wonderful areas to be placed in books. I think Tudor style was a hit because it offered a chance to get into a part where so many had no idea what to expect. The love of details about the architecture adds alot to a story and puts the reader in another part of the world. I would not know the difference between north or south of England so I feel to me the story could be from either.

    Reply
  84. I was never interested in books located in UK until my neice moved to England and now the books gives me insights for places very unknown to me.England is full of wonderful areas to be placed in books. I think Tudor style was a hit because it offered a chance to get into a part where so many had no idea what to expect. The love of details about the architecture adds alot to a story and puts the reader in another part of the world. I would not know the difference between north or south of England so I feel to me the story could be from either.

    Reply
  85. I was never interested in books located in UK until my neice moved to England and now the books gives me insights for places very unknown to me.England is full of wonderful areas to be placed in books. I think Tudor style was a hit because it offered a chance to get into a part where so many had no idea what to expect. The love of details about the architecture adds alot to a story and puts the reader in another part of the world. I would not know the difference between north or south of England so I feel to me the story could be from either.

    Reply
  86. thanks for sharing the wonderful pictures as I truly enjoy seeing other parts of our world..I will never get to travel to these places myself so depend on others to share their trips with me. I can only imagine all the memories good and bad from the pictures you posted.

    Reply
  87. thanks for sharing the wonderful pictures as I truly enjoy seeing other parts of our world..I will never get to travel to these places myself so depend on others to share their trips with me. I can only imagine all the memories good and bad from the pictures you posted.

    Reply
  88. thanks for sharing the wonderful pictures as I truly enjoy seeing other parts of our world..I will never get to travel to these places myself so depend on others to share their trips with me. I can only imagine all the memories good and bad from the pictures you posted.

    Reply
  89. thanks for sharing the wonderful pictures as I truly enjoy seeing other parts of our world..I will never get to travel to these places myself so depend on others to share their trips with me. I can only imagine all the memories good and bad from the pictures you posted.

    Reply
  90. thanks for sharing the wonderful pictures as I truly enjoy seeing other parts of our world..I will never get to travel to these places myself so depend on others to share their trips with me. I can only imagine all the memories good and bad from the pictures you posted.

    Reply
  91. Thanks for the pictures. I love English History – As for the Tudors popularity – Historically the Tudor period was tumultous. So much happened – The Church of England, the dissolution of Monasteries, and very colorful characters – Thomas Moore, Cranmer, etc. The period is usually not usually used for romance writing, however Susan Wiggs has a trilogy written about that period – The Tudor Rose trilogy. Very good.
    As far as where in England i like my reading from – it would be the north (Closer to Scotland) and also London to Wales. Along with romance I like history in the novels I read.
    Keep up the comentary please, I find England a fascinating place.
    Thank you – Rose Zbiegien

    Reply
  92. Thanks for the pictures. I love English History – As for the Tudors popularity – Historically the Tudor period was tumultous. So much happened – The Church of England, the dissolution of Monasteries, and very colorful characters – Thomas Moore, Cranmer, etc. The period is usually not usually used for romance writing, however Susan Wiggs has a trilogy written about that period – The Tudor Rose trilogy. Very good.
    As far as where in England i like my reading from – it would be the north (Closer to Scotland) and also London to Wales. Along with romance I like history in the novels I read.
    Keep up the comentary please, I find England a fascinating place.
    Thank you – Rose Zbiegien

    Reply
  93. Thanks for the pictures. I love English History – As for the Tudors popularity – Historically the Tudor period was tumultous. So much happened – The Church of England, the dissolution of Monasteries, and very colorful characters – Thomas Moore, Cranmer, etc. The period is usually not usually used for romance writing, however Susan Wiggs has a trilogy written about that period – The Tudor Rose trilogy. Very good.
    As far as where in England i like my reading from – it would be the north (Closer to Scotland) and also London to Wales. Along with romance I like history in the novels I read.
    Keep up the comentary please, I find England a fascinating place.
    Thank you – Rose Zbiegien

    Reply
  94. Thanks for the pictures. I love English History – As for the Tudors popularity – Historically the Tudor period was tumultous. So much happened – The Church of England, the dissolution of Monasteries, and very colorful characters – Thomas Moore, Cranmer, etc. The period is usually not usually used for romance writing, however Susan Wiggs has a trilogy written about that period – The Tudor Rose trilogy. Very good.
    As far as where in England i like my reading from – it would be the north (Closer to Scotland) and also London to Wales. Along with romance I like history in the novels I read.
    Keep up the comentary please, I find England a fascinating place.
    Thank you – Rose Zbiegien

    Reply
  95. Thanks for the pictures. I love English History – As for the Tudors popularity – Historically the Tudor period was tumultous. So much happened – The Church of England, the dissolution of Monasteries, and very colorful characters – Thomas Moore, Cranmer, etc. The period is usually not usually used for romance writing, however Susan Wiggs has a trilogy written about that period – The Tudor Rose trilogy. Very good.
    As far as where in England i like my reading from – it would be the north (Closer to Scotland) and also London to Wales. Along with romance I like history in the novels I read.
    Keep up the comentary please, I find England a fascinating place.
    Thank you – Rose Zbiegien

    Reply
  96. I am a new reader to historical fiction and I find learning about those eras fascinating. So my knowledge of time periods is limited to answer your first question. I do like some descriptions of stiles and architecture, but I find that too much and I may skip over a paragraph if its too detailed (just being honest). I don’t if its written with a nice blend with the story. I do not have any preference to the north or south. Thanks for your books, I’m really excited about The Secret Duke coming out.

    Reply
  97. I am a new reader to historical fiction and I find learning about those eras fascinating. So my knowledge of time periods is limited to answer your first question. I do like some descriptions of stiles and architecture, but I find that too much and I may skip over a paragraph if its too detailed (just being honest). I don’t if its written with a nice blend with the story. I do not have any preference to the north or south. Thanks for your books, I’m really excited about The Secret Duke coming out.

    Reply
  98. I am a new reader to historical fiction and I find learning about those eras fascinating. So my knowledge of time periods is limited to answer your first question. I do like some descriptions of stiles and architecture, but I find that too much and I may skip over a paragraph if its too detailed (just being honest). I don’t if its written with a nice blend with the story. I do not have any preference to the north or south. Thanks for your books, I’m really excited about The Secret Duke coming out.

    Reply
  99. I am a new reader to historical fiction and I find learning about those eras fascinating. So my knowledge of time periods is limited to answer your first question. I do like some descriptions of stiles and architecture, but I find that too much and I may skip over a paragraph if its too detailed (just being honest). I don’t if its written with a nice blend with the story. I do not have any preference to the north or south. Thanks for your books, I’m really excited about The Secret Duke coming out.

    Reply
  100. I am a new reader to historical fiction and I find learning about those eras fascinating. So my knowledge of time periods is limited to answer your first question. I do like some descriptions of stiles and architecture, but I find that too much and I may skip over a paragraph if its too detailed (just being honest). I don’t if its written with a nice blend with the story. I do not have any preference to the north or south. Thanks for your books, I’m really excited about The Secret Duke coming out.

    Reply
  101. Thank you for the pictures. I had always thought of a stile as stairs over a fence rather than through a hedge. I love the details and descriptions that you provide for the architecture and it’s surroundings to the minute details of everyday life of the time. I seem to become enchanted by any/every location. I have just about worn out my map of the UK from referring to it so often while reading. North or South doesn’t matter, although I am more and more interested in Scotland. Ever since I first learned of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed I’ve been on the look out for that book. I am happy to know it will be re-released soon. I have found that I do not enjoy reading stories dated much before 1740. I do enjoy Georgian times, find the Regency period and some afterwards of the most interest. I have learned far more history from romance books than ever from school. In fact I would have said I disliked history. I’ve even picked up American history as well. I have always enjoyed your ‘author’s notes’ that you include in many of your books. One request to you as well as other authors: please include somewhere translations of foreign words, most especially Gaelic. Ideally pronunciation as well. I know it sounds nothing like it appears. I have not had much success in searching dictionaries on-line, but maybe someone could steer me to one that works. Thank you so much for the enjoyable hours reading and learning.

    Reply
  102. Thank you for the pictures. I had always thought of a stile as stairs over a fence rather than through a hedge. I love the details and descriptions that you provide for the architecture and it’s surroundings to the minute details of everyday life of the time. I seem to become enchanted by any/every location. I have just about worn out my map of the UK from referring to it so often while reading. North or South doesn’t matter, although I am more and more interested in Scotland. Ever since I first learned of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed I’ve been on the look out for that book. I am happy to know it will be re-released soon. I have found that I do not enjoy reading stories dated much before 1740. I do enjoy Georgian times, find the Regency period and some afterwards of the most interest. I have learned far more history from romance books than ever from school. In fact I would have said I disliked history. I’ve even picked up American history as well. I have always enjoyed your ‘author’s notes’ that you include in many of your books. One request to you as well as other authors: please include somewhere translations of foreign words, most especially Gaelic. Ideally pronunciation as well. I know it sounds nothing like it appears. I have not had much success in searching dictionaries on-line, but maybe someone could steer me to one that works. Thank you so much for the enjoyable hours reading and learning.

    Reply
  103. Thank you for the pictures. I had always thought of a stile as stairs over a fence rather than through a hedge. I love the details and descriptions that you provide for the architecture and it’s surroundings to the minute details of everyday life of the time. I seem to become enchanted by any/every location. I have just about worn out my map of the UK from referring to it so often while reading. North or South doesn’t matter, although I am more and more interested in Scotland. Ever since I first learned of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed I’ve been on the look out for that book. I am happy to know it will be re-released soon. I have found that I do not enjoy reading stories dated much before 1740. I do enjoy Georgian times, find the Regency period and some afterwards of the most interest. I have learned far more history from romance books than ever from school. In fact I would have said I disliked history. I’ve even picked up American history as well. I have always enjoyed your ‘author’s notes’ that you include in many of your books. One request to you as well as other authors: please include somewhere translations of foreign words, most especially Gaelic. Ideally pronunciation as well. I know it sounds nothing like it appears. I have not had much success in searching dictionaries on-line, but maybe someone could steer me to one that works. Thank you so much for the enjoyable hours reading and learning.

    Reply
  104. Thank you for the pictures. I had always thought of a stile as stairs over a fence rather than through a hedge. I love the details and descriptions that you provide for the architecture and it’s surroundings to the minute details of everyday life of the time. I seem to become enchanted by any/every location. I have just about worn out my map of the UK from referring to it so often while reading. North or South doesn’t matter, although I am more and more interested in Scotland. Ever since I first learned of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed I’ve been on the look out for that book. I am happy to know it will be re-released soon. I have found that I do not enjoy reading stories dated much before 1740. I do enjoy Georgian times, find the Regency period and some afterwards of the most interest. I have learned far more history from romance books than ever from school. In fact I would have said I disliked history. I’ve even picked up American history as well. I have always enjoyed your ‘author’s notes’ that you include in many of your books. One request to you as well as other authors: please include somewhere translations of foreign words, most especially Gaelic. Ideally pronunciation as well. I know it sounds nothing like it appears. I have not had much success in searching dictionaries on-line, but maybe someone could steer me to one that works. Thank you so much for the enjoyable hours reading and learning.

    Reply
  105. Thank you for the pictures. I had always thought of a stile as stairs over a fence rather than through a hedge. I love the details and descriptions that you provide for the architecture and it’s surroundings to the minute details of everyday life of the time. I seem to become enchanted by any/every location. I have just about worn out my map of the UK from referring to it so often while reading. North or South doesn’t matter, although I am more and more interested in Scotland. Ever since I first learned of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed I’ve been on the look out for that book. I am happy to know it will be re-released soon. I have found that I do not enjoy reading stories dated much before 1740. I do enjoy Georgian times, find the Regency period and some afterwards of the most interest. I have learned far more history from romance books than ever from school. In fact I would have said I disliked history. I’ve even picked up American history as well. I have always enjoyed your ‘author’s notes’ that you include in many of your books. One request to you as well as other authors: please include somewhere translations of foreign words, most especially Gaelic. Ideally pronunciation as well. I know it sounds nothing like it appears. I have not had much success in searching dictionaries on-line, but maybe someone could steer me to one that works. Thank you so much for the enjoyable hours reading and learning.

    Reply
  106. Hi Jo! Congratulations on finding a home. I know you must be so excited to get settled in.
    Personally, the more descriptive tidbits an author can give me, like Palladian and stile, the better my “theatre of the mind” works. One of the things I love about your work is the way you pack it with those sorts of details without disrupting the flow of the story.
    Thanks for sharing those pics,
    Emily

    Reply
  107. Hi Jo! Congratulations on finding a home. I know you must be so excited to get settled in.
    Personally, the more descriptive tidbits an author can give me, like Palladian and stile, the better my “theatre of the mind” works. One of the things I love about your work is the way you pack it with those sorts of details without disrupting the flow of the story.
    Thanks for sharing those pics,
    Emily

    Reply
  108. Hi Jo! Congratulations on finding a home. I know you must be so excited to get settled in.
    Personally, the more descriptive tidbits an author can give me, like Palladian and stile, the better my “theatre of the mind” works. One of the things I love about your work is the way you pack it with those sorts of details without disrupting the flow of the story.
    Thanks for sharing those pics,
    Emily

    Reply
  109. Hi Jo! Congratulations on finding a home. I know you must be so excited to get settled in.
    Personally, the more descriptive tidbits an author can give me, like Palladian and stile, the better my “theatre of the mind” works. One of the things I love about your work is the way you pack it with those sorts of details without disrupting the flow of the story.
    Thanks for sharing those pics,
    Emily

    Reply
  110. Hi Jo! Congratulations on finding a home. I know you must be so excited to get settled in.
    Personally, the more descriptive tidbits an author can give me, like Palladian and stile, the better my “theatre of the mind” works. One of the things I love about your work is the way you pack it with those sorts of details without disrupting the flow of the story.
    Thanks for sharing those pics,
    Emily

    Reply
  111. Hi Jo, from Beverly Joan at the book sale. So glad to read your update and that you have found your new home. Hope the move in goes well.
    I prefer the Regency period for settings but also enjoy other periods. I am not really into the ‘time travel’ settings. I like some detail ie description of stiles etc. I have learned more history through reading novels that are well researched then I ever learned in school. I pick up every book that I can find who have settings in Scotland and Ireland. They are few and far between. Where do I find my books? Second hand book stores, garage sales, whereever. I have almost your complete collection but must admit I am running out of shelf space. I do this with my favorite authors as I can always pull out a book on a rainy day and do a reread of an old favourite. I look forward to hearing more from you and will watch for my missing links.
    Joan

    Reply
  112. Hi Jo, from Beverly Joan at the book sale. So glad to read your update and that you have found your new home. Hope the move in goes well.
    I prefer the Regency period for settings but also enjoy other periods. I am not really into the ‘time travel’ settings. I like some detail ie description of stiles etc. I have learned more history through reading novels that are well researched then I ever learned in school. I pick up every book that I can find who have settings in Scotland and Ireland. They are few and far between. Where do I find my books? Second hand book stores, garage sales, whereever. I have almost your complete collection but must admit I am running out of shelf space. I do this with my favorite authors as I can always pull out a book on a rainy day and do a reread of an old favourite. I look forward to hearing more from you and will watch for my missing links.
    Joan

    Reply
  113. Hi Jo, from Beverly Joan at the book sale. So glad to read your update and that you have found your new home. Hope the move in goes well.
    I prefer the Regency period for settings but also enjoy other periods. I am not really into the ‘time travel’ settings. I like some detail ie description of stiles etc. I have learned more history through reading novels that are well researched then I ever learned in school. I pick up every book that I can find who have settings in Scotland and Ireland. They are few and far between. Where do I find my books? Second hand book stores, garage sales, whereever. I have almost your complete collection but must admit I am running out of shelf space. I do this with my favorite authors as I can always pull out a book on a rainy day and do a reread of an old favourite. I look forward to hearing more from you and will watch for my missing links.
    Joan

    Reply
  114. Hi Jo, from Beverly Joan at the book sale. So glad to read your update and that you have found your new home. Hope the move in goes well.
    I prefer the Regency period for settings but also enjoy other periods. I am not really into the ‘time travel’ settings. I like some detail ie description of stiles etc. I have learned more history through reading novels that are well researched then I ever learned in school. I pick up every book that I can find who have settings in Scotland and Ireland. They are few and far between. Where do I find my books? Second hand book stores, garage sales, whereever. I have almost your complete collection but must admit I am running out of shelf space. I do this with my favorite authors as I can always pull out a book on a rainy day and do a reread of an old favourite. I look forward to hearing more from you and will watch for my missing links.
    Joan

    Reply
  115. Hi Jo, from Beverly Joan at the book sale. So glad to read your update and that you have found your new home. Hope the move in goes well.
    I prefer the Regency period for settings but also enjoy other periods. I am not really into the ‘time travel’ settings. I like some detail ie description of stiles etc. I have learned more history through reading novels that are well researched then I ever learned in school. I pick up every book that I can find who have settings in Scotland and Ireland. They are few and far between. Where do I find my books? Second hand book stores, garage sales, whereever. I have almost your complete collection but must admit I am running out of shelf space. I do this with my favorite authors as I can always pull out a book on a rainy day and do a reread of an old favourite. I look forward to hearing more from you and will watch for my missing links.
    Joan

    Reply
  116. Maybe start in the North…and have glorious adventures while traveling to the South.
    The only castle I remember exploring is Conway Castle in Wales.
    Glad you have a new place.

    Reply
  117. Maybe start in the North…and have glorious adventures while traveling to the South.
    The only castle I remember exploring is Conway Castle in Wales.
    Glad you have a new place.

    Reply
  118. Maybe start in the North…and have glorious adventures while traveling to the South.
    The only castle I remember exploring is Conway Castle in Wales.
    Glad you have a new place.

    Reply
  119. Maybe start in the North…and have glorious adventures while traveling to the South.
    The only castle I remember exploring is Conway Castle in Wales.
    Glad you have a new place.

    Reply
  120. Maybe start in the North…and have glorious adventures while traveling to the South.
    The only castle I remember exploring is Conway Castle in Wales.
    Glad you have a new place.

    Reply
  121. A new home, a new adventure (even though you are returning to your “homeland”). I’m sure you will find things that have changed & those that haven’t. Old castles, monasteries, Palladian homes,styles, natures scenery, all the foil for you to weave your magic wand of words. My ancestors came from Somerset, Scotland, & Ireland so I’ve hungerly devoured with relish all your books I could get my hands on. It makes no difference whether North or South, you show us the scenery & bring us there as we read along! Thank you!

    Reply
  122. A new home, a new adventure (even though you are returning to your “homeland”). I’m sure you will find things that have changed & those that haven’t. Old castles, monasteries, Palladian homes,styles, natures scenery, all the foil for you to weave your magic wand of words. My ancestors came from Somerset, Scotland, & Ireland so I’ve hungerly devoured with relish all your books I could get my hands on. It makes no difference whether North or South, you show us the scenery & bring us there as we read along! Thank you!

    Reply
  123. A new home, a new adventure (even though you are returning to your “homeland”). I’m sure you will find things that have changed & those that haven’t. Old castles, monasteries, Palladian homes,styles, natures scenery, all the foil for you to weave your magic wand of words. My ancestors came from Somerset, Scotland, & Ireland so I’ve hungerly devoured with relish all your books I could get my hands on. It makes no difference whether North or South, you show us the scenery & bring us there as we read along! Thank you!

    Reply
  124. A new home, a new adventure (even though you are returning to your “homeland”). I’m sure you will find things that have changed & those that haven’t. Old castles, monasteries, Palladian homes,styles, natures scenery, all the foil for you to weave your magic wand of words. My ancestors came from Somerset, Scotland, & Ireland so I’ve hungerly devoured with relish all your books I could get my hands on. It makes no difference whether North or South, you show us the scenery & bring us there as we read along! Thank you!

    Reply
  125. A new home, a new adventure (even though you are returning to your “homeland”). I’m sure you will find things that have changed & those that haven’t. Old castles, monasteries, Palladian homes,styles, natures scenery, all the foil for you to weave your magic wand of words. My ancestors came from Somerset, Scotland, & Ireland so I’ve hungerly devoured with relish all your books I could get my hands on. It makes no difference whether North or South, you show us the scenery & bring us there as we read along! Thank you!

    Reply
  126. I find it all very fascinating – north and south. I’ve only been to England once and you don’t get to see much in a few days and would love to go back. But reading about it is the next best thing. I enjoy learning new words and all the descriptions given especially in historicals. Thanks.

    Reply
  127. I find it all very fascinating – north and south. I’ve only been to England once and you don’t get to see much in a few days and would love to go back. But reading about it is the next best thing. I enjoy learning new words and all the descriptions given especially in historicals. Thanks.

    Reply
  128. I find it all very fascinating – north and south. I’ve only been to England once and you don’t get to see much in a few days and would love to go back. But reading about it is the next best thing. I enjoy learning new words and all the descriptions given especially in historicals. Thanks.

    Reply
  129. I find it all very fascinating – north and south. I’ve only been to England once and you don’t get to see much in a few days and would love to go back. But reading about it is the next best thing. I enjoy learning new words and all the descriptions given especially in historicals. Thanks.

    Reply
  130. I find it all very fascinating – north and south. I’ve only been to England once and you don’t get to see much in a few days and would love to go back. But reading about it is the next best thing. I enjoy learning new words and all the descriptions given especially in historicals. Thanks.

    Reply
  131. Interesting question about North or South of England stories.
    My personal preference: I like those set up between York and Durham in the north; visions of Hadrian’s Wall or walking the moors comes to mind.
    But I also love the Cotswolds and Bucks/Buckinghamshire.

    Reply
  132. Interesting question about North or South of England stories.
    My personal preference: I like those set up between York and Durham in the north; visions of Hadrian’s Wall or walking the moors comes to mind.
    But I also love the Cotswolds and Bucks/Buckinghamshire.

    Reply
  133. Interesting question about North or South of England stories.
    My personal preference: I like those set up between York and Durham in the north; visions of Hadrian’s Wall or walking the moors comes to mind.
    But I also love the Cotswolds and Bucks/Buckinghamshire.

    Reply
  134. Interesting question about North or South of England stories.
    My personal preference: I like those set up between York and Durham in the north; visions of Hadrian’s Wall or walking the moors comes to mind.
    But I also love the Cotswolds and Bucks/Buckinghamshire.

    Reply
  135. Interesting question about North or South of England stories.
    My personal preference: I like those set up between York and Durham in the north; visions of Hadrian’s Wall or walking the moors comes to mind.
    But I also love the Cotswolds and Bucks/Buckinghamshire.

    Reply
  136. The old architecture and such things as stiles are always enjoyable in a story. I have never been to England but as an old Lit major, I wish I had. Please write on and put in all the details that your editors will allow. I will be out here enjoying!

    Reply
  137. The old architecture and such things as stiles are always enjoyable in a story. I have never been to England but as an old Lit major, I wish I had. Please write on and put in all the details that your editors will allow. I will be out here enjoying!

    Reply
  138. The old architecture and such things as stiles are always enjoyable in a story. I have never been to England but as an old Lit major, I wish I had. Please write on and put in all the details that your editors will allow. I will be out here enjoying!

    Reply
  139. The old architecture and such things as stiles are always enjoyable in a story. I have never been to England but as an old Lit major, I wish I had. Please write on and put in all the details that your editors will allow. I will be out here enjoying!

    Reply
  140. The old architecture and such things as stiles are always enjoyable in a story. I have never been to England but as an old Lit major, I wish I had. Please write on and put in all the details that your editors will allow. I will be out here enjoying!

    Reply
  141. Jo, I love your books and they’ve always been my “keepers.” I even have the older regencies. I can’t wait to see how you incorporate your new experiences in the UK into upcoming books.
    I really loved it when you moved up north during the Malloran series. I’ve always thought the north has been neglected by romances, but as someone above has mentioned it does take so long to get to London from York or Scotland. I have always loved your attention to detail in period clothing in your romances. I get so disappointed when historic characters aren’t dressed properly. Any detail in architecture would be a treasure. Thank you for keeping me so well amused over the last (eek) 20 years. – Patty

    Reply
  142. Jo, I love your books and they’ve always been my “keepers.” I even have the older regencies. I can’t wait to see how you incorporate your new experiences in the UK into upcoming books.
    I really loved it when you moved up north during the Malloran series. I’ve always thought the north has been neglected by romances, but as someone above has mentioned it does take so long to get to London from York or Scotland. I have always loved your attention to detail in period clothing in your romances. I get so disappointed when historic characters aren’t dressed properly. Any detail in architecture would be a treasure. Thank you for keeping me so well amused over the last (eek) 20 years. – Patty

    Reply
  143. Jo, I love your books and they’ve always been my “keepers.” I even have the older regencies. I can’t wait to see how you incorporate your new experiences in the UK into upcoming books.
    I really loved it when you moved up north during the Malloran series. I’ve always thought the north has been neglected by romances, but as someone above has mentioned it does take so long to get to London from York or Scotland. I have always loved your attention to detail in period clothing in your romances. I get so disappointed when historic characters aren’t dressed properly. Any detail in architecture would be a treasure. Thank you for keeping me so well amused over the last (eek) 20 years. – Patty

    Reply
  144. Jo, I love your books and they’ve always been my “keepers.” I even have the older regencies. I can’t wait to see how you incorporate your new experiences in the UK into upcoming books.
    I really loved it when you moved up north during the Malloran series. I’ve always thought the north has been neglected by romances, but as someone above has mentioned it does take so long to get to London from York or Scotland. I have always loved your attention to detail in period clothing in your romances. I get so disappointed when historic characters aren’t dressed properly. Any detail in architecture would be a treasure. Thank you for keeping me so well amused over the last (eek) 20 years. – Patty

    Reply
  145. Jo, I love your books and they’ve always been my “keepers.” I even have the older regencies. I can’t wait to see how you incorporate your new experiences in the UK into upcoming books.
    I really loved it when you moved up north during the Malloran series. I’ve always thought the north has been neglected by romances, but as someone above has mentioned it does take so long to get to London from York or Scotland. I have always loved your attention to detail in period clothing in your romances. I get so disappointed when historic characters aren’t dressed properly. Any detail in architecture would be a treasure. Thank you for keeping me so well amused over the last (eek) 20 years. – Patty

    Reply
  146. I love to hear about the landscape and architecture of places I have never been (which is pretty much anywhere outside the US), so keep it up! I have almost finished reading Notes From a Small Island by Bill Bryson and I really enjoy hearing about the hikes through the landscape and the old architecture. I even appreciate his frustration with how Britain does not appreciate all of its architecture or even its hedge system. I must be an odd man out, because I would rather hear about the history and countryside than some fashion (even though that’s history, also). I’m just not much of a fashion person, I guess. As far as vocabulary goes, please feel free to expand our minds. Romance is my guilty pleasure. If I was improving my vocabulary, perhaps I could assuage my guilt just a bit…
    As far as where in England you base your book, I don’t care. Just please do not try to “show” Scottish or Welsh accents. I often find that frustrating. Otherwise, so long as I have descriptions of the countryside and some history in there I’m as happy as a lark (well, that and the “romance” portion).

    Reply
  147. I love to hear about the landscape and architecture of places I have never been (which is pretty much anywhere outside the US), so keep it up! I have almost finished reading Notes From a Small Island by Bill Bryson and I really enjoy hearing about the hikes through the landscape and the old architecture. I even appreciate his frustration with how Britain does not appreciate all of its architecture or even its hedge system. I must be an odd man out, because I would rather hear about the history and countryside than some fashion (even though that’s history, also). I’m just not much of a fashion person, I guess. As far as vocabulary goes, please feel free to expand our minds. Romance is my guilty pleasure. If I was improving my vocabulary, perhaps I could assuage my guilt just a bit…
    As far as where in England you base your book, I don’t care. Just please do not try to “show” Scottish or Welsh accents. I often find that frustrating. Otherwise, so long as I have descriptions of the countryside and some history in there I’m as happy as a lark (well, that and the “romance” portion).

    Reply
  148. I love to hear about the landscape and architecture of places I have never been (which is pretty much anywhere outside the US), so keep it up! I have almost finished reading Notes From a Small Island by Bill Bryson and I really enjoy hearing about the hikes through the landscape and the old architecture. I even appreciate his frustration with how Britain does not appreciate all of its architecture or even its hedge system. I must be an odd man out, because I would rather hear about the history and countryside than some fashion (even though that’s history, also). I’m just not much of a fashion person, I guess. As far as vocabulary goes, please feel free to expand our minds. Romance is my guilty pleasure. If I was improving my vocabulary, perhaps I could assuage my guilt just a bit…
    As far as where in England you base your book, I don’t care. Just please do not try to “show” Scottish or Welsh accents. I often find that frustrating. Otherwise, so long as I have descriptions of the countryside and some history in there I’m as happy as a lark (well, that and the “romance” portion).

    Reply
  149. I love to hear about the landscape and architecture of places I have never been (which is pretty much anywhere outside the US), so keep it up! I have almost finished reading Notes From a Small Island by Bill Bryson and I really enjoy hearing about the hikes through the landscape and the old architecture. I even appreciate his frustration with how Britain does not appreciate all of its architecture or even its hedge system. I must be an odd man out, because I would rather hear about the history and countryside than some fashion (even though that’s history, also). I’m just not much of a fashion person, I guess. As far as vocabulary goes, please feel free to expand our minds. Romance is my guilty pleasure. If I was improving my vocabulary, perhaps I could assuage my guilt just a bit…
    As far as where in England you base your book, I don’t care. Just please do not try to “show” Scottish or Welsh accents. I often find that frustrating. Otherwise, so long as I have descriptions of the countryside and some history in there I’m as happy as a lark (well, that and the “romance” portion).

    Reply
  150. I love to hear about the landscape and architecture of places I have never been (which is pretty much anywhere outside the US), so keep it up! I have almost finished reading Notes From a Small Island by Bill Bryson and I really enjoy hearing about the hikes through the landscape and the old architecture. I even appreciate his frustration with how Britain does not appreciate all of its architecture or even its hedge system. I must be an odd man out, because I would rather hear about the history and countryside than some fashion (even though that’s history, also). I’m just not much of a fashion person, I guess. As far as vocabulary goes, please feel free to expand our minds. Romance is my guilty pleasure. If I was improving my vocabulary, perhaps I could assuage my guilt just a bit…
    As far as where in England you base your book, I don’t care. Just please do not try to “show” Scottish or Welsh accents. I often find that frustrating. Otherwise, so long as I have descriptions of the countryside and some history in there I’m as happy as a lark (well, that and the “romance” portion).

    Reply
  151. Thanks for more comments, especially those that say you’re enjoying my work! We authors are so insecure. We love to be told readers are enjoying the books. 🙂
    For those of you wanting more details about British history and settings, there are a lot of websites and some are rich. Try museums, which often have on line exhibitions.
    There’s more here about the mechanical swan at the Bowes Museum.
    http://www.thebowesmuseum.org.uk/the-silver-swan/history/
    Or search for your area of interest. These days I find it works better with a string of words to try to get around all the businesses trying to get to the top of the results.
    Jo

    Reply
  152. Thanks for more comments, especially those that say you’re enjoying my work! We authors are so insecure. We love to be told readers are enjoying the books. 🙂
    For those of you wanting more details about British history and settings, there are a lot of websites and some are rich. Try museums, which often have on line exhibitions.
    There’s more here about the mechanical swan at the Bowes Museum.
    http://www.thebowesmuseum.org.uk/the-silver-swan/history/
    Or search for your area of interest. These days I find it works better with a string of words to try to get around all the businesses trying to get to the top of the results.
    Jo

    Reply
  153. Thanks for more comments, especially those that say you’re enjoying my work! We authors are so insecure. We love to be told readers are enjoying the books. 🙂
    For those of you wanting more details about British history and settings, there are a lot of websites and some are rich. Try museums, which often have on line exhibitions.
    There’s more here about the mechanical swan at the Bowes Museum.
    http://www.thebowesmuseum.org.uk/the-silver-swan/history/
    Or search for your area of interest. These days I find it works better with a string of words to try to get around all the businesses trying to get to the top of the results.
    Jo

    Reply
  154. Thanks for more comments, especially those that say you’re enjoying my work! We authors are so insecure. We love to be told readers are enjoying the books. 🙂
    For those of you wanting more details about British history and settings, there are a lot of websites and some are rich. Try museums, which often have on line exhibitions.
    There’s more here about the mechanical swan at the Bowes Museum.
    http://www.thebowesmuseum.org.uk/the-silver-swan/history/
    Or search for your area of interest. These days I find it works better with a string of words to try to get around all the businesses trying to get to the top of the results.
    Jo

    Reply
  155. Thanks for more comments, especially those that say you’re enjoying my work! We authors are so insecure. We love to be told readers are enjoying the books. 🙂
    For those of you wanting more details about British history and settings, there are a lot of websites and some are rich. Try museums, which often have on line exhibitions.
    There’s more here about the mechanical swan at the Bowes Museum.
    http://www.thebowesmuseum.org.uk/the-silver-swan/history/
    Or search for your area of interest. These days I find it works better with a string of words to try to get around all the businesses trying to get to the top of the results.
    Jo

    Reply
  156. Lovely pics, Jo, and an enjoyable stroll through the rich history that seems to be embeddded in every inch of English soil (giving an American sigh here, wishing that our small towns were all as picturesque as English ones.) And thank you for the interesting snippet of church history.
    Both north and south are equally “romantic” for me, though I tend to set my stories in the south because I’m more familiar with the countryside. I look forward to seeing more photos and detailed descriptions of the area from you when you are settled.

    Reply
  157. Lovely pics, Jo, and an enjoyable stroll through the rich history that seems to be embeddded in every inch of English soil (giving an American sigh here, wishing that our small towns were all as picturesque as English ones.) And thank you for the interesting snippet of church history.
    Both north and south are equally “romantic” for me, though I tend to set my stories in the south because I’m more familiar with the countryside. I look forward to seeing more photos and detailed descriptions of the area from you when you are settled.

    Reply
  158. Lovely pics, Jo, and an enjoyable stroll through the rich history that seems to be embeddded in every inch of English soil (giving an American sigh here, wishing that our small towns were all as picturesque as English ones.) And thank you for the interesting snippet of church history.
    Both north and south are equally “romantic” for me, though I tend to set my stories in the south because I’m more familiar with the countryside. I look forward to seeing more photos and detailed descriptions of the area from you when you are settled.

    Reply
  159. Lovely pics, Jo, and an enjoyable stroll through the rich history that seems to be embeddded in every inch of English soil (giving an American sigh here, wishing that our small towns were all as picturesque as English ones.) And thank you for the interesting snippet of church history.
    Both north and south are equally “romantic” for me, though I tend to set my stories in the south because I’m more familiar with the countryside. I look forward to seeing more photos and detailed descriptions of the area from you when you are settled.

    Reply
  160. Lovely pics, Jo, and an enjoyable stroll through the rich history that seems to be embeddded in every inch of English soil (giving an American sigh here, wishing that our small towns were all as picturesque as English ones.) And thank you for the interesting snippet of church history.
    Both north and south are equally “romantic” for me, though I tend to set my stories in the south because I’m more familiar with the countryside. I look forward to seeing more photos and detailed descriptions of the area from you when you are settled.

    Reply
  161. Jo, I have no North/South preference, but I like the country better than the city, in real life as well as in books. My Grandfather had a stile on his farm in Indiana, so I’m familiar with them, but can’t get enough of those wonderful architectural features- where I’m from, there are few buildings over a hundred years old, and none of the castles, monasteries, stately homes, or even the stone bridges you’ve shown us- everything around here was built of concrete and steel. So when I read books set in England, I love descriptions of houses, gardens, and parish churches- even the local ruins or the occasional cow byre add to the story for me. I have a copy of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed with that horrible cover featuring the color blind Jane and the flabby Lord Wraybourne- I can’t wait to replace it with the new one!If I don’t win I will still buy one. What do you suggest I do with the old ugly copy? Maybe we wench followers could stage a ceremonial book-cover burning!

    Reply
  162. Jo, I have no North/South preference, but I like the country better than the city, in real life as well as in books. My Grandfather had a stile on his farm in Indiana, so I’m familiar with them, but can’t get enough of those wonderful architectural features- where I’m from, there are few buildings over a hundred years old, and none of the castles, monasteries, stately homes, or even the stone bridges you’ve shown us- everything around here was built of concrete and steel. So when I read books set in England, I love descriptions of houses, gardens, and parish churches- even the local ruins or the occasional cow byre add to the story for me. I have a copy of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed with that horrible cover featuring the color blind Jane and the flabby Lord Wraybourne- I can’t wait to replace it with the new one!If I don’t win I will still buy one. What do you suggest I do with the old ugly copy? Maybe we wench followers could stage a ceremonial book-cover burning!

    Reply
  163. Jo, I have no North/South preference, but I like the country better than the city, in real life as well as in books. My Grandfather had a stile on his farm in Indiana, so I’m familiar with them, but can’t get enough of those wonderful architectural features- where I’m from, there are few buildings over a hundred years old, and none of the castles, monasteries, stately homes, or even the stone bridges you’ve shown us- everything around here was built of concrete and steel. So when I read books set in England, I love descriptions of houses, gardens, and parish churches- even the local ruins or the occasional cow byre add to the story for me. I have a copy of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed with that horrible cover featuring the color blind Jane and the flabby Lord Wraybourne- I can’t wait to replace it with the new one!If I don’t win I will still buy one. What do you suggest I do with the old ugly copy? Maybe we wench followers could stage a ceremonial book-cover burning!

    Reply
  164. Jo, I have no North/South preference, but I like the country better than the city, in real life as well as in books. My Grandfather had a stile on his farm in Indiana, so I’m familiar with them, but can’t get enough of those wonderful architectural features- where I’m from, there are few buildings over a hundred years old, and none of the castles, monasteries, stately homes, or even the stone bridges you’ve shown us- everything around here was built of concrete and steel. So when I read books set in England, I love descriptions of houses, gardens, and parish churches- even the local ruins or the occasional cow byre add to the story for me. I have a copy of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed with that horrible cover featuring the color blind Jane and the flabby Lord Wraybourne- I can’t wait to replace it with the new one!If I don’t win I will still buy one. What do you suggest I do with the old ugly copy? Maybe we wench followers could stage a ceremonial book-cover burning!

    Reply
  165. Jo, I have no North/South preference, but I like the country better than the city, in real life as well as in books. My Grandfather had a stile on his farm in Indiana, so I’m familiar with them, but can’t get enough of those wonderful architectural features- where I’m from, there are few buildings over a hundred years old, and none of the castles, monasteries, stately homes, or even the stone bridges you’ve shown us- everything around here was built of concrete and steel. So when I read books set in England, I love descriptions of houses, gardens, and parish churches- even the local ruins or the occasional cow byre add to the story for me. I have a copy of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed with that horrible cover featuring the color blind Jane and the flabby Lord Wraybourne- I can’t wait to replace it with the new one!If I don’t win I will still buy one. What do you suggest I do with the old ugly copy? Maybe we wench followers could stage a ceremonial book-cover burning!

    Reply
  166. I love coming across terms like Palladian because if I don’t know them, I learn something new and if I already know it, I feel so smart! 🙂
    North of England seems made for rougher, more adventurous novels. The South seems more for genteel house parties and subtle intrigue. But that’s just my general impression. 🙂
    Others have touched on this, but I think that the Tudor era is so fraught with terror as well as intrigue and romance that it takes a hearty soul to tackle it – author and reader!
    Thanks for a lovely meander, Jo. 🙂
    BTW, I’m listening to To Rescue a Rogue and remembering why I loved it so much the first time I read it. Thanks for the treat. 🙂

    Reply
  167. I love coming across terms like Palladian because if I don’t know them, I learn something new and if I already know it, I feel so smart! 🙂
    North of England seems made for rougher, more adventurous novels. The South seems more for genteel house parties and subtle intrigue. But that’s just my general impression. 🙂
    Others have touched on this, but I think that the Tudor era is so fraught with terror as well as intrigue and romance that it takes a hearty soul to tackle it – author and reader!
    Thanks for a lovely meander, Jo. 🙂
    BTW, I’m listening to To Rescue a Rogue and remembering why I loved it so much the first time I read it. Thanks for the treat. 🙂

    Reply
  168. I love coming across terms like Palladian because if I don’t know them, I learn something new and if I already know it, I feel so smart! 🙂
    North of England seems made for rougher, more adventurous novels. The South seems more for genteel house parties and subtle intrigue. But that’s just my general impression. 🙂
    Others have touched on this, but I think that the Tudor era is so fraught with terror as well as intrigue and romance that it takes a hearty soul to tackle it – author and reader!
    Thanks for a lovely meander, Jo. 🙂
    BTW, I’m listening to To Rescue a Rogue and remembering why I loved it so much the first time I read it. Thanks for the treat. 🙂

    Reply
  169. I love coming across terms like Palladian because if I don’t know them, I learn something new and if I already know it, I feel so smart! 🙂
    North of England seems made for rougher, more adventurous novels. The South seems more for genteel house parties and subtle intrigue. But that’s just my general impression. 🙂
    Others have touched on this, but I think that the Tudor era is so fraught with terror as well as intrigue and romance that it takes a hearty soul to tackle it – author and reader!
    Thanks for a lovely meander, Jo. 🙂
    BTW, I’m listening to To Rescue a Rogue and remembering why I loved it so much the first time I read it. Thanks for the treat. 🙂

    Reply
  170. I love coming across terms like Palladian because if I don’t know them, I learn something new and if I already know it, I feel so smart! 🙂
    North of England seems made for rougher, more adventurous novels. The South seems more for genteel house parties and subtle intrigue. But that’s just my general impression. 🙂
    Others have touched on this, but I think that the Tudor era is so fraught with terror as well as intrigue and romance that it takes a hearty soul to tackle it – author and reader!
    Thanks for a lovely meander, Jo. 🙂
    BTW, I’m listening to To Rescue a Rogue and remembering why I loved it so much the first time I read it. Thanks for the treat. 🙂

    Reply
  171. Hi Jo,
    I’m a history professor, and I just taught my first class of an introductory course for this fall – and I mentioned “The Tudors” 🙂 So I had to respond to that aspect of your post. I think that popular interest in the period is really limited to the wives of Henry VIII – the romantic tragedies. I don’t think people do like to read much about subsequent events, particularly in the reigns of Edward and Mary. Too much suffering perhaps – not enough romance or pomp. Elizabeth was good at the pomp…
    But I was telling my students that knowing more “real” history makes the fiction – books, tv or movies – more interesting, because you can appreciate it when the author gets details right – which is certainly an aspect of your books that I appreciate. I’ve loved the Mallorens – and I didn’t used to think much of the 18th century (did I mention that my own era is modern – that is, late 19th?)
    All the best – I envy you living in Whitby, I’ve had several opportunities to travel in beautiful Yorkshire, but haven’t gotten there yet.
    Helen V.

    Reply
  172. Hi Jo,
    I’m a history professor, and I just taught my first class of an introductory course for this fall – and I mentioned “The Tudors” 🙂 So I had to respond to that aspect of your post. I think that popular interest in the period is really limited to the wives of Henry VIII – the romantic tragedies. I don’t think people do like to read much about subsequent events, particularly in the reigns of Edward and Mary. Too much suffering perhaps – not enough romance or pomp. Elizabeth was good at the pomp…
    But I was telling my students that knowing more “real” history makes the fiction – books, tv or movies – more interesting, because you can appreciate it when the author gets details right – which is certainly an aspect of your books that I appreciate. I’ve loved the Mallorens – and I didn’t used to think much of the 18th century (did I mention that my own era is modern – that is, late 19th?)
    All the best – I envy you living in Whitby, I’ve had several opportunities to travel in beautiful Yorkshire, but haven’t gotten there yet.
    Helen V.

    Reply
  173. Hi Jo,
    I’m a history professor, and I just taught my first class of an introductory course for this fall – and I mentioned “The Tudors” 🙂 So I had to respond to that aspect of your post. I think that popular interest in the period is really limited to the wives of Henry VIII – the romantic tragedies. I don’t think people do like to read much about subsequent events, particularly in the reigns of Edward and Mary. Too much suffering perhaps – not enough romance or pomp. Elizabeth was good at the pomp…
    But I was telling my students that knowing more “real” history makes the fiction – books, tv or movies – more interesting, because you can appreciate it when the author gets details right – which is certainly an aspect of your books that I appreciate. I’ve loved the Mallorens – and I didn’t used to think much of the 18th century (did I mention that my own era is modern – that is, late 19th?)
    All the best – I envy you living in Whitby, I’ve had several opportunities to travel in beautiful Yorkshire, but haven’t gotten there yet.
    Helen V.

    Reply
  174. Hi Jo,
    I’m a history professor, and I just taught my first class of an introductory course for this fall – and I mentioned “The Tudors” 🙂 So I had to respond to that aspect of your post. I think that popular interest in the period is really limited to the wives of Henry VIII – the romantic tragedies. I don’t think people do like to read much about subsequent events, particularly in the reigns of Edward and Mary. Too much suffering perhaps – not enough romance or pomp. Elizabeth was good at the pomp…
    But I was telling my students that knowing more “real” history makes the fiction – books, tv or movies – more interesting, because you can appreciate it when the author gets details right – which is certainly an aspect of your books that I appreciate. I’ve loved the Mallorens – and I didn’t used to think much of the 18th century (did I mention that my own era is modern – that is, late 19th?)
    All the best – I envy you living in Whitby, I’ve had several opportunities to travel in beautiful Yorkshire, but haven’t gotten there yet.
    Helen V.

    Reply
  175. Hi Jo,
    I’m a history professor, and I just taught my first class of an introductory course for this fall – and I mentioned “The Tudors” 🙂 So I had to respond to that aspect of your post. I think that popular interest in the period is really limited to the wives of Henry VIII – the romantic tragedies. I don’t think people do like to read much about subsequent events, particularly in the reigns of Edward and Mary. Too much suffering perhaps – not enough romance or pomp. Elizabeth was good at the pomp…
    But I was telling my students that knowing more “real” history makes the fiction – books, tv or movies – more interesting, because you can appreciate it when the author gets details right – which is certainly an aspect of your books that I appreciate. I’ve loved the Mallorens – and I didn’t used to think much of the 18th century (did I mention that my own era is modern – that is, late 19th?)
    All the best – I envy you living in Whitby, I’ve had several opportunities to travel in beautiful Yorkshire, but haven’t gotten there yet.
    Helen V.

    Reply
  176. Lovely post, really old ruins are always the most intersting. Gretchen wondered what to do with her old copy of LWB – treasure it!!!! Old and dog-eared can only mean well read and well loved and if you seriously need to get rid of it, I can provide a loving home.
    In answer to your questions, I find the Tudor period intriguing, almost frighting the lengths people went to to rise to the top of the grace and favour ladder and I never tire of it, same goes for period detail, our imaginations need it (well mine does) and I am especially fond of stiles, I grew up with them in England as a girl and my favourite stile is in Devils Heiress!!! (My favourite couple – by far) As for the North?South debate, well I love the South and as a previous post mentioned, it has more of a gentile way about it even thought the Southern Coast can be truly rugged by my Heart is in the North, born and bred in Cheshire I have heartfelt memories of Delamere Forest and crossing into Wales, yup the North gets my vote.

    Reply
  177. Lovely post, really old ruins are always the most intersting. Gretchen wondered what to do with her old copy of LWB – treasure it!!!! Old and dog-eared can only mean well read and well loved and if you seriously need to get rid of it, I can provide a loving home.
    In answer to your questions, I find the Tudor period intriguing, almost frighting the lengths people went to to rise to the top of the grace and favour ladder and I never tire of it, same goes for period detail, our imaginations need it (well mine does) and I am especially fond of stiles, I grew up with them in England as a girl and my favourite stile is in Devils Heiress!!! (My favourite couple – by far) As for the North?South debate, well I love the South and as a previous post mentioned, it has more of a gentile way about it even thought the Southern Coast can be truly rugged by my Heart is in the North, born and bred in Cheshire I have heartfelt memories of Delamere Forest and crossing into Wales, yup the North gets my vote.

    Reply
  178. Lovely post, really old ruins are always the most intersting. Gretchen wondered what to do with her old copy of LWB – treasure it!!!! Old and dog-eared can only mean well read and well loved and if you seriously need to get rid of it, I can provide a loving home.
    In answer to your questions, I find the Tudor period intriguing, almost frighting the lengths people went to to rise to the top of the grace and favour ladder and I never tire of it, same goes for period detail, our imaginations need it (well mine does) and I am especially fond of stiles, I grew up with them in England as a girl and my favourite stile is in Devils Heiress!!! (My favourite couple – by far) As for the North?South debate, well I love the South and as a previous post mentioned, it has more of a gentile way about it even thought the Southern Coast can be truly rugged by my Heart is in the North, born and bred in Cheshire I have heartfelt memories of Delamere Forest and crossing into Wales, yup the North gets my vote.

    Reply
  179. Lovely post, really old ruins are always the most intersting. Gretchen wondered what to do with her old copy of LWB – treasure it!!!! Old and dog-eared can only mean well read and well loved and if you seriously need to get rid of it, I can provide a loving home.
    In answer to your questions, I find the Tudor period intriguing, almost frighting the lengths people went to to rise to the top of the grace and favour ladder and I never tire of it, same goes for period detail, our imaginations need it (well mine does) and I am especially fond of stiles, I grew up with them in England as a girl and my favourite stile is in Devils Heiress!!! (My favourite couple – by far) As for the North?South debate, well I love the South and as a previous post mentioned, it has more of a gentile way about it even thought the Southern Coast can be truly rugged by my Heart is in the North, born and bred in Cheshire I have heartfelt memories of Delamere Forest and crossing into Wales, yup the North gets my vote.

    Reply
  180. Lovely post, really old ruins are always the most intersting. Gretchen wondered what to do with her old copy of LWB – treasure it!!!! Old and dog-eared can only mean well read and well loved and if you seriously need to get rid of it, I can provide a loving home.
    In answer to your questions, I find the Tudor period intriguing, almost frighting the lengths people went to to rise to the top of the grace and favour ladder and I never tire of it, same goes for period detail, our imaginations need it (well mine does) and I am especially fond of stiles, I grew up with them in England as a girl and my favourite stile is in Devils Heiress!!! (My favourite couple – by far) As for the North?South debate, well I love the South and as a previous post mentioned, it has more of a gentile way about it even thought the Southern Coast can be truly rugged by my Heart is in the North, born and bred in Cheshire I have heartfelt memories of Delamere Forest and crossing into Wales, yup the North gets my vote.

    Reply
  181. Stiles – well what about kissing gates? I wonder how many readers know of these lovely old reminders of a slower, more contented age.
    Being a southern born gal (Essex) I really ought to plump for the south, but I’m afraid I tend to head north for holidays. Just think: York, Chester, Buxton, Newcastle, Carlisle, Harrogate – all these could provide terrific settings or part settings for tales of ‘derring do (or even ‘derring don’t). London is certainly easier to write about, but a little research could reveal tons of information about towns and cities in the North.
    The only Tudor books I’ve really enjoyed have been the series by
    P F Chisholm on Robert Carey. I think he is a terrific character, and have read his memoirs with great interest (yes, he really existed!!) The Tudor period was certain a tumultuous one in English history, but I’m afraid it fails to pull at my hearstrings.
    Anyway, enough for now, Whitby is very fortunate to have a new resident, best fish and chips in the country.

    Reply
  182. Stiles – well what about kissing gates? I wonder how many readers know of these lovely old reminders of a slower, more contented age.
    Being a southern born gal (Essex) I really ought to plump for the south, but I’m afraid I tend to head north for holidays. Just think: York, Chester, Buxton, Newcastle, Carlisle, Harrogate – all these could provide terrific settings or part settings for tales of ‘derring do (or even ‘derring don’t). London is certainly easier to write about, but a little research could reveal tons of information about towns and cities in the North.
    The only Tudor books I’ve really enjoyed have been the series by
    P F Chisholm on Robert Carey. I think he is a terrific character, and have read his memoirs with great interest (yes, he really existed!!) The Tudor period was certain a tumultuous one in English history, but I’m afraid it fails to pull at my hearstrings.
    Anyway, enough for now, Whitby is very fortunate to have a new resident, best fish and chips in the country.

    Reply
  183. Stiles – well what about kissing gates? I wonder how many readers know of these lovely old reminders of a slower, more contented age.
    Being a southern born gal (Essex) I really ought to plump for the south, but I’m afraid I tend to head north for holidays. Just think: York, Chester, Buxton, Newcastle, Carlisle, Harrogate – all these could provide terrific settings or part settings for tales of ‘derring do (or even ‘derring don’t). London is certainly easier to write about, but a little research could reveal tons of information about towns and cities in the North.
    The only Tudor books I’ve really enjoyed have been the series by
    P F Chisholm on Robert Carey. I think he is a terrific character, and have read his memoirs with great interest (yes, he really existed!!) The Tudor period was certain a tumultuous one in English history, but I’m afraid it fails to pull at my hearstrings.
    Anyway, enough for now, Whitby is very fortunate to have a new resident, best fish and chips in the country.

    Reply
  184. Stiles – well what about kissing gates? I wonder how many readers know of these lovely old reminders of a slower, more contented age.
    Being a southern born gal (Essex) I really ought to plump for the south, but I’m afraid I tend to head north for holidays. Just think: York, Chester, Buxton, Newcastle, Carlisle, Harrogate – all these could provide terrific settings or part settings for tales of ‘derring do (or even ‘derring don’t). London is certainly easier to write about, but a little research could reveal tons of information about towns and cities in the North.
    The only Tudor books I’ve really enjoyed have been the series by
    P F Chisholm on Robert Carey. I think he is a terrific character, and have read his memoirs with great interest (yes, he really existed!!) The Tudor period was certain a tumultuous one in English history, but I’m afraid it fails to pull at my hearstrings.
    Anyway, enough for now, Whitby is very fortunate to have a new resident, best fish and chips in the country.

    Reply
  185. Stiles – well what about kissing gates? I wonder how many readers know of these lovely old reminders of a slower, more contented age.
    Being a southern born gal (Essex) I really ought to plump for the south, but I’m afraid I tend to head north for holidays. Just think: York, Chester, Buxton, Newcastle, Carlisle, Harrogate – all these could provide terrific settings or part settings for tales of ‘derring do (or even ‘derring don’t). London is certainly easier to write about, but a little research could reveal tons of information about towns and cities in the North.
    The only Tudor books I’ve really enjoyed have been the series by
    P F Chisholm on Robert Carey. I think he is a terrific character, and have read his memoirs with great interest (yes, he really existed!!) The Tudor period was certain a tumultuous one in English history, but I’m afraid it fails to pull at my hearstrings.
    Anyway, enough for now, Whitby is very fortunate to have a new resident, best fish and chips in the country.

    Reply
  186. Sorry to be so late with this post, but have been away from computers for a week.
    I feel compelled to respond to the post from Joan Eales, where she mentions that she has learned a lot of history from books. And this is exactly what upsets me about ‘The Tudors’. How many people now believe that Henry’s sister Margaret married the King of Portugal and then murdered him? I loved the show for the costumes, sets, etc (ok, gorgeous actors!) but need to remind myself that the history may not be accurate.
    In general, I think most authors do a better job in keeping the basic history straight and greatly appreciate the effort.

    Reply
  187. Sorry to be so late with this post, but have been away from computers for a week.
    I feel compelled to respond to the post from Joan Eales, where she mentions that she has learned a lot of history from books. And this is exactly what upsets me about ‘The Tudors’. How many people now believe that Henry’s sister Margaret married the King of Portugal and then murdered him? I loved the show for the costumes, sets, etc (ok, gorgeous actors!) but need to remind myself that the history may not be accurate.
    In general, I think most authors do a better job in keeping the basic history straight and greatly appreciate the effort.

    Reply
  188. Sorry to be so late with this post, but have been away from computers for a week.
    I feel compelled to respond to the post from Joan Eales, where she mentions that she has learned a lot of history from books. And this is exactly what upsets me about ‘The Tudors’. How many people now believe that Henry’s sister Margaret married the King of Portugal and then murdered him? I loved the show for the costumes, sets, etc (ok, gorgeous actors!) but need to remind myself that the history may not be accurate.
    In general, I think most authors do a better job in keeping the basic history straight and greatly appreciate the effort.

    Reply
  189. Sorry to be so late with this post, but have been away from computers for a week.
    I feel compelled to respond to the post from Joan Eales, where she mentions that she has learned a lot of history from books. And this is exactly what upsets me about ‘The Tudors’. How many people now believe that Henry’s sister Margaret married the King of Portugal and then murdered him? I loved the show for the costumes, sets, etc (ok, gorgeous actors!) but need to remind myself that the history may not be accurate.
    In general, I think most authors do a better job in keeping the basic history straight and greatly appreciate the effort.

    Reply
  190. Sorry to be so late with this post, but have been away from computers for a week.
    I feel compelled to respond to the post from Joan Eales, where she mentions that she has learned a lot of history from books. And this is exactly what upsets me about ‘The Tudors’. How many people now believe that Henry’s sister Margaret married the King of Portugal and then murdered him? I loved the show for the costumes, sets, etc (ok, gorgeous actors!) but need to remind myself that the history may not be accurate.
    In general, I think most authors do a better job in keeping the basic history straight and greatly appreciate the effort.

    Reply
  191. Thank you for that photo of the stile, Jo! I never knew what one looked like before, and they are really quite interesting. Having studied architectural history I did know the term Palladian, for example, but it never hurts to throw in some good description around any term – enough to give that mental picture to both the initiated and uninitiated. Hard to define – Susan Kearnsley had some interesting things to say on that subject in her posting to ‘Wenches’, I thought.
    Like many of those above I don’t prefer the north or south of England. If I’m caught up in a story it doesn’t matter where it is set. Anyplace in the world can be interesting to me if there is a good story going on.
    Best of luck with the move next week – the new home looks lovely.

    Reply
  192. Thank you for that photo of the stile, Jo! I never knew what one looked like before, and they are really quite interesting. Having studied architectural history I did know the term Palladian, for example, but it never hurts to throw in some good description around any term – enough to give that mental picture to both the initiated and uninitiated. Hard to define – Susan Kearnsley had some interesting things to say on that subject in her posting to ‘Wenches’, I thought.
    Like many of those above I don’t prefer the north or south of England. If I’m caught up in a story it doesn’t matter where it is set. Anyplace in the world can be interesting to me if there is a good story going on.
    Best of luck with the move next week – the new home looks lovely.

    Reply
  193. Thank you for that photo of the stile, Jo! I never knew what one looked like before, and they are really quite interesting. Having studied architectural history I did know the term Palladian, for example, but it never hurts to throw in some good description around any term – enough to give that mental picture to both the initiated and uninitiated. Hard to define – Susan Kearnsley had some interesting things to say on that subject in her posting to ‘Wenches’, I thought.
    Like many of those above I don’t prefer the north or south of England. If I’m caught up in a story it doesn’t matter where it is set. Anyplace in the world can be interesting to me if there is a good story going on.
    Best of luck with the move next week – the new home looks lovely.

    Reply
  194. Thank you for that photo of the stile, Jo! I never knew what one looked like before, and they are really quite interesting. Having studied architectural history I did know the term Palladian, for example, but it never hurts to throw in some good description around any term – enough to give that mental picture to both the initiated and uninitiated. Hard to define – Susan Kearnsley had some interesting things to say on that subject in her posting to ‘Wenches’, I thought.
    Like many of those above I don’t prefer the north or south of England. If I’m caught up in a story it doesn’t matter where it is set. Anyplace in the world can be interesting to me if there is a good story going on.
    Best of luck with the move next week – the new home looks lovely.

    Reply
  195. Thank you for that photo of the stile, Jo! I never knew what one looked like before, and they are really quite interesting. Having studied architectural history I did know the term Palladian, for example, but it never hurts to throw in some good description around any term – enough to give that mental picture to both the initiated and uninitiated. Hard to define – Susan Kearnsley had some interesting things to say on that subject in her posting to ‘Wenches’, I thought.
    Like many of those above I don’t prefer the north or south of England. If I’m caught up in a story it doesn’t matter where it is set. Anyplace in the world can be interesting to me if there is a good story going on.
    Best of luck with the move next week – the new home looks lovely.

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