A Georgette Heyer Soiree

GH shelfNicola here. Last week I spent a most enjoyable evening in London at a Georgette Heyer soiree. It was part of a two-day event organised jointly by London University and the London Book Fair; earlier in the day there had been a conference on Georgette Heyer and her writing which my writing friend and colleague Sophie Weston had attended. You can read her report on the conference here  and it’s both fun and thought-provoking, like Georgette Heyer herself.

The evening soiree was, appropriately enough, in an 18th century townhouse, The House of St GH evening 2Barnabas, 1 Greek Street, Soho, London. It has been a homeless charity since 1862 and is now also a private members’ club dedicated to charity work. The first house on the site was built during The Restoration period, a grand mansion with coach house and stables. This original house was demolished for a new one to be built between 1744 and 1747. It is in glorious Georgian style with beautiful rococo plasterwork. When we visited it was also decorated with football memorabilia to celebrate the World Cup; a case of the old meeting the new! According to research, the rooms and gardens of the House of St Barnabas were the blueprint for the imagined lodgings of Dr. Manette and Lucy in A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens. The alleyway on one side of the house was later re-named Manette Street.

We were met at the entrance to the reception rooms by a lady and gentleman in period costume who greeted us with appropriate formality, thereby making me realise that although I wrote and read Regency fiction a great deal, I was on uncertain ground when it came to putting the manners into practise!

The NonsuchThe first part of the evening was a discussion around the theme of “Two hundred years of social mores: From dance cards to online dating.” I’d been invited to lead this debate with Alison Flood, a journalist and Georgette Heyer fan. As there had recently been some discussion in the press comparing the TV programme Love Island to a Jane Austen novel we decided to take this as our starting point and having checked how many of the fifty or so people present had watched Love Island (three) asked whether people felt there were any similarities between the two. Some lively discussion followed! We agreed that there were some superficial similarities, for example people have always tended to judge on first impressions whether on Tinder, Love Island or at the Pemberley Ball.  In a relatively closed society, whether it be artificially so (Love Island) or a Regency village, newcomers often spell trouble and gossip abounds.

A lot of people felt that they would have preferred a Regency-style courtship to modern-day dating. However an examination of this GH evening
idea showed various pros and cons. It feels as though both time and subtlety are often missing from today’s dating. Everything happens fast because life happens fast. But of course in the Regency period matches were often made on quite a short acquaintance without having the chance to get to know one another very well, particularly if there was family pressure. People were also appreciative of the fact that these days there is a great deal more opportunity to meet a potential partner than there was in the past – although it might not always feel like it. Everyone agreed though that the courtesy, respect and “rules” of 19th century society could be helpful in comparison to what sometimes feels like chaos in the social interactions of today. And then there were the dress codes. Maybe we were old-fashioned (although there was a good age range in the audience) but we all agreed that Regency dress for both men and women was more attractive than tiny bikinis and endless six packs, even on Poldark! There was a sense of “put it away; public nudity is becoming boring.”

Other threads we discussed included the influence of Georgette Heyer’s own era on her writing, which is something Sophie also mentions in her blog, and the fact that we were in effect comparing our modern day reality with historical fiction, or in the case of Jane Austen’s writing, contemporary fiction. All in all it was a stimulating discussion that ran over time until we were all desperate for supper! We concluded by sharing our favourite Heyer books and why we liked them. There was an audible gasp in the room, and some disapproval, when I said that for many years my favourite Georgette Heyer book had been Beauvallet although these days I would probably choose Devil’s Cub or her short stories. We could all agree, though on the perennial appeal and talent of Georgette Heyer as an author and thought that perhaps one of the reasons we enjoy her books is that her characters do to some extent thwart convention whilst operating within that society.

Belsay grand carriageAfter a delicious supper of modern canapes when we discussed everything from the popularity of Regency dancing to historical accuracy in books and costume dramas, we had some pianoforte music and tackled the fiendishly difficult Heyer quiz, which made me realise I needed to brush up on my knowledge of her books to have a hope of matching the experts. No doubt a Regency lady would have described the evening approvingly as “a crush” and for me and the other guests, I hope, it was wonderful fun to talk to so many Regency aficionados. I left to get the train home, rather wishing I had a carriage waiting!

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the topics we discussed at the Heyer soiree or on her books or any aspect of the discussion.  What is it about the social behaviours of Regency society that we find attractive? What are the similarities and differences, and the pros and cons of dating now and then? Which would you prefer? And which one element of Regency manners would you re-introduce or encourage in modern society if you could?

110 thoughts on “A Georgette Heyer Soiree”

  1. Nicola you always take us to the most interesting places!
    Most of what I know about Regency behavior comes from the many novels that I read. It seems to me that the rules for women were set up to protect them. And considering how powerless women were, they were probably appreciated as well as resented for being so restrictive. However, most of the stories I read concern upper class women. I don’t know how the rules would apply to middle or working class women. How many of them could afford to hire a companion for a chaperone?
    As for today’s on-line dating, the few people I know who have tried it didn’t have too much success. However, it sounds good in theory if you are not too gullible.
    When I was a sweet young thing (back in the 60s), we met guys at dance clubs where the music was so loud it discouraged talking. Could have used a nice soft minuet or a waltz back then and it might have saved some of my hearing too (smile).

    Reply
  2. Nicola you always take us to the most interesting places!
    Most of what I know about Regency behavior comes from the many novels that I read. It seems to me that the rules for women were set up to protect them. And considering how powerless women were, they were probably appreciated as well as resented for being so restrictive. However, most of the stories I read concern upper class women. I don’t know how the rules would apply to middle or working class women. How many of them could afford to hire a companion for a chaperone?
    As for today’s on-line dating, the few people I know who have tried it didn’t have too much success. However, it sounds good in theory if you are not too gullible.
    When I was a sweet young thing (back in the 60s), we met guys at dance clubs where the music was so loud it discouraged talking. Could have used a nice soft minuet or a waltz back then and it might have saved some of my hearing too (smile).

    Reply
  3. Nicola you always take us to the most interesting places!
    Most of what I know about Regency behavior comes from the many novels that I read. It seems to me that the rules for women were set up to protect them. And considering how powerless women were, they were probably appreciated as well as resented for being so restrictive. However, most of the stories I read concern upper class women. I don’t know how the rules would apply to middle or working class women. How many of them could afford to hire a companion for a chaperone?
    As for today’s on-line dating, the few people I know who have tried it didn’t have too much success. However, it sounds good in theory if you are not too gullible.
    When I was a sweet young thing (back in the 60s), we met guys at dance clubs where the music was so loud it discouraged talking. Could have used a nice soft minuet or a waltz back then and it might have saved some of my hearing too (smile).

    Reply
  4. Nicola you always take us to the most interesting places!
    Most of what I know about Regency behavior comes from the many novels that I read. It seems to me that the rules for women were set up to protect them. And considering how powerless women were, they were probably appreciated as well as resented for being so restrictive. However, most of the stories I read concern upper class women. I don’t know how the rules would apply to middle or working class women. How many of them could afford to hire a companion for a chaperone?
    As for today’s on-line dating, the few people I know who have tried it didn’t have too much success. However, it sounds good in theory if you are not too gullible.
    When I was a sweet young thing (back in the 60s), we met guys at dance clubs where the music was so loud it discouraged talking. Could have used a nice soft minuet or a waltz back then and it might have saved some of my hearing too (smile).

    Reply
  5. Nicola you always take us to the most interesting places!
    Most of what I know about Regency behavior comes from the many novels that I read. It seems to me that the rules for women were set up to protect them. And considering how powerless women were, they were probably appreciated as well as resented for being so restrictive. However, most of the stories I read concern upper class women. I don’t know how the rules would apply to middle or working class women. How many of them could afford to hire a companion for a chaperone?
    As for today’s on-line dating, the few people I know who have tried it didn’t have too much success. However, it sounds good in theory if you are not too gullible.
    When I was a sweet young thing (back in the 60s), we met guys at dance clubs where the music was so loud it discouraged talking. Could have used a nice soft minuet or a waltz back then and it might have saved some of my hearing too (smile).

    Reply
  6. Thank you, Mary! Yes, that’s a very pertinent point about reading about upper class women and even the gentry. I doubt there were the same social rules and restrictions in place lower down the social scale. Certainly my ancestors were all working class and a lot of the women were already pregnant when they got married:)

    Reply
  7. Thank you, Mary! Yes, that’s a very pertinent point about reading about upper class women and even the gentry. I doubt there were the same social rules and restrictions in place lower down the social scale. Certainly my ancestors were all working class and a lot of the women were already pregnant when they got married:)

    Reply
  8. Thank you, Mary! Yes, that’s a very pertinent point about reading about upper class women and even the gentry. I doubt there were the same social rules and restrictions in place lower down the social scale. Certainly my ancestors were all working class and a lot of the women were already pregnant when they got married:)

    Reply
  9. Thank you, Mary! Yes, that’s a very pertinent point about reading about upper class women and even the gentry. I doubt there were the same social rules and restrictions in place lower down the social scale. Certainly my ancestors were all working class and a lot of the women were already pregnant when they got married:)

    Reply
  10. Thank you, Mary! Yes, that’s a very pertinent point about reading about upper class women and even the gentry. I doubt there were the same social rules and restrictions in place lower down the social scale. Certainly my ancestors were all working class and a lot of the women were already pregnant when they got married:)

    Reply
  11. I had already read Sophia’s report, so I thoroughly enjoyed this follow up.
    I enjoy reading traditional Regencies,and other historical novels set in this time period, but most of them are subversive; the characters chafe at the rules. And I absolutely abhor the vicious gossip of the ton (which I believe has move to Facebook and Twitter).
    That type of gossip comes from people who have nothing constructive to do. Or people who don’t have a life of their own. I suppose that will never change, but oh HOW I wish it would.

    Reply
  12. I had already read Sophia’s report, so I thoroughly enjoyed this follow up.
    I enjoy reading traditional Regencies,and other historical novels set in this time period, but most of them are subversive; the characters chafe at the rules. And I absolutely abhor the vicious gossip of the ton (which I believe has move to Facebook and Twitter).
    That type of gossip comes from people who have nothing constructive to do. Or people who don’t have a life of their own. I suppose that will never change, but oh HOW I wish it would.

    Reply
  13. I had already read Sophia’s report, so I thoroughly enjoyed this follow up.
    I enjoy reading traditional Regencies,and other historical novels set in this time period, but most of them are subversive; the characters chafe at the rules. And I absolutely abhor the vicious gossip of the ton (which I believe has move to Facebook and Twitter).
    That type of gossip comes from people who have nothing constructive to do. Or people who don’t have a life of their own. I suppose that will never change, but oh HOW I wish it would.

    Reply
  14. I had already read Sophia’s report, so I thoroughly enjoyed this follow up.
    I enjoy reading traditional Regencies,and other historical novels set in this time period, but most of them are subversive; the characters chafe at the rules. And I absolutely abhor the vicious gossip of the ton (which I believe has move to Facebook and Twitter).
    That type of gossip comes from people who have nothing constructive to do. Or people who don’t have a life of their own. I suppose that will never change, but oh HOW I wish it would.

    Reply
  15. I had already read Sophia’s report, so I thoroughly enjoyed this follow up.
    I enjoy reading traditional Regencies,and other historical novels set in this time period, but most of them are subversive; the characters chafe at the rules. And I absolutely abhor the vicious gossip of the ton (which I believe has move to Facebook and Twitter).
    That type of gossip comes from people who have nothing constructive to do. Or people who don’t have a life of their own. I suppose that will never change, but oh HOW I wish it would.

    Reply
  16. What a great conference you attended, Nicola. I would add “A Civil Contract” as a favorite but love all of Heyer’s Regency novels.
    I prefer a slower approach to dating. That aspect of the Regency time period would suit me but without pressure from family then or now.
    The restrictions of the time with oppressive laws and no reliable birth control would push me to the present to find a true gentleman here.

    Reply
  17. What a great conference you attended, Nicola. I would add “A Civil Contract” as a favorite but love all of Heyer’s Regency novels.
    I prefer a slower approach to dating. That aspect of the Regency time period would suit me but without pressure from family then or now.
    The restrictions of the time with oppressive laws and no reliable birth control would push me to the present to find a true gentleman here.

    Reply
  18. What a great conference you attended, Nicola. I would add “A Civil Contract” as a favorite but love all of Heyer’s Regency novels.
    I prefer a slower approach to dating. That aspect of the Regency time period would suit me but without pressure from family then or now.
    The restrictions of the time with oppressive laws and no reliable birth control would push me to the present to find a true gentleman here.

    Reply
  19. What a great conference you attended, Nicola. I would add “A Civil Contract” as a favorite but love all of Heyer’s Regency novels.
    I prefer a slower approach to dating. That aspect of the Regency time period would suit me but without pressure from family then or now.
    The restrictions of the time with oppressive laws and no reliable birth control would push me to the present to find a true gentleman here.

    Reply
  20. What a great conference you attended, Nicola. I would add “A Civil Contract” as a favorite but love all of Heyer’s Regency novels.
    I prefer a slower approach to dating. That aspect of the Regency time period would suit me but without pressure from family then or now.
    The restrictions of the time with oppressive laws and no reliable birth control would push me to the present to find a true gentleman here.

    Reply
  21. There are many things I miss about ordinary manners as I’ve read about them in regency literature: letting people finish their sentences without interrupting; rising when someone enters the room; holding doors open, especially for people with their hands full; waiting for everyone to be served before beginning to eat; rational discussion instead of immediate kneejerk in-your-face confrontation; just a general awareness of the effect on others of what we say or do. I’m probably as guilty of these gaffes as anybody else, but I miss good manners nonetheless.

    Reply
  22. There are many things I miss about ordinary manners as I’ve read about them in regency literature: letting people finish their sentences without interrupting; rising when someone enters the room; holding doors open, especially for people with their hands full; waiting for everyone to be served before beginning to eat; rational discussion instead of immediate kneejerk in-your-face confrontation; just a general awareness of the effect on others of what we say or do. I’m probably as guilty of these gaffes as anybody else, but I miss good manners nonetheless.

    Reply
  23. There are many things I miss about ordinary manners as I’ve read about them in regency literature: letting people finish their sentences without interrupting; rising when someone enters the room; holding doors open, especially for people with their hands full; waiting for everyone to be served before beginning to eat; rational discussion instead of immediate kneejerk in-your-face confrontation; just a general awareness of the effect on others of what we say or do. I’m probably as guilty of these gaffes as anybody else, but I miss good manners nonetheless.

    Reply
  24. There are many things I miss about ordinary manners as I’ve read about them in regency literature: letting people finish their sentences without interrupting; rising when someone enters the room; holding doors open, especially for people with their hands full; waiting for everyone to be served before beginning to eat; rational discussion instead of immediate kneejerk in-your-face confrontation; just a general awareness of the effect on others of what we say or do. I’m probably as guilty of these gaffes as anybody else, but I miss good manners nonetheless.

    Reply
  25. There are many things I miss about ordinary manners as I’ve read about them in regency literature: letting people finish their sentences without interrupting; rising when someone enters the room; holding doors open, especially for people with their hands full; waiting for everyone to be served before beginning to eat; rational discussion instead of immediate kneejerk in-your-face confrontation; just a general awareness of the effect on others of what we say or do. I’m probably as guilty of these gaffes as anybody else, but I miss good manners nonetheless.

    Reply
  26. Hi Patricia – Yes, a number of people mentioned A Civil Contract. I am going to re-read that one soon!
    I do agree we can have the best of both worlds in the present if we find the right partner, which makes us very fortunate.

    Reply
  27. Hi Patricia – Yes, a number of people mentioned A Civil Contract. I am going to re-read that one soon!
    I do agree we can have the best of both worlds in the present if we find the right partner, which makes us very fortunate.

    Reply
  28. Hi Patricia – Yes, a number of people mentioned A Civil Contract. I am going to re-read that one soon!
    I do agree we can have the best of both worlds in the present if we find the right partner, which makes us very fortunate.

    Reply
  29. Hi Patricia – Yes, a number of people mentioned A Civil Contract. I am going to re-read that one soon!
    I do agree we can have the best of both worlds in the present if we find the right partner, which makes us very fortunate.

    Reply
  30. Hi Patricia – Yes, a number of people mentioned A Civil Contract. I am going to re-read that one soon!
    I do agree we can have the best of both worlds in the present if we find the right partner, which makes us very fortunate.

    Reply
  31. I would second all of those things, Janice. I like good manners and I do try to employ them even though I too make gaffes. Don’t we all! But as a principle it’s good, I feel. Definitely the pace of life seems to makes some people more impatient and less polite.

    Reply
  32. I would second all of those things, Janice. I like good manners and I do try to employ them even though I too make gaffes. Don’t we all! But as a principle it’s good, I feel. Definitely the pace of life seems to makes some people more impatient and less polite.

    Reply
  33. I would second all of those things, Janice. I like good manners and I do try to employ them even though I too make gaffes. Don’t we all! But as a principle it’s good, I feel. Definitely the pace of life seems to makes some people more impatient and less polite.

    Reply
  34. I would second all of those things, Janice. I like good manners and I do try to employ them even though I too make gaffes. Don’t we all! But as a principle it’s good, I feel. Definitely the pace of life seems to makes some people more impatient and less polite.

    Reply
  35. I would second all of those things, Janice. I like good manners and I do try to employ them even though I too make gaffes. Don’t we all! But as a principle it’s good, I feel. Definitely the pace of life seems to makes some people more impatient and less polite.

    Reply
  36. I know that I have read some of Heyer’s books but so long ago, I can’t remember which. Time to revisit. Any suggestions where to start?

    Reply
  37. I know that I have read some of Heyer’s books but so long ago, I can’t remember which. Time to revisit. Any suggestions where to start?

    Reply
  38. I know that I have read some of Heyer’s books but so long ago, I can’t remember which. Time to revisit. Any suggestions where to start?

    Reply
  39. I know that I have read some of Heyer’s books but so long ago, I can’t remember which. Time to revisit. Any suggestions where to start?

    Reply
  40. I know that I have read some of Heyer’s books but so long ago, I can’t remember which. Time to revisit. Any suggestions where to start?

    Reply
  41. I miss manners. Courtesy and respect. Those things would be greatly appreciated in modern times. I would not want the strictures (being female) or the hygienic/medical practices of the time though. Dating…I met my husband online in a pen pal chat room loonnnnggg before it was cool (20 years ago or so?) but I don’t think I could handle the quick run at it that is so popular now. I want to take time, slow down, learn something about them and determine if I want to hear their opinions/snoring for the rest of my life. LOL I love the concept of this conference! So fun.

    Reply
  42. I miss manners. Courtesy and respect. Those things would be greatly appreciated in modern times. I would not want the strictures (being female) or the hygienic/medical practices of the time though. Dating…I met my husband online in a pen pal chat room loonnnnggg before it was cool (20 years ago or so?) but I don’t think I could handle the quick run at it that is so popular now. I want to take time, slow down, learn something about them and determine if I want to hear their opinions/snoring for the rest of my life. LOL I love the concept of this conference! So fun.

    Reply
  43. I miss manners. Courtesy and respect. Those things would be greatly appreciated in modern times. I would not want the strictures (being female) or the hygienic/medical practices of the time though. Dating…I met my husband online in a pen pal chat room loonnnnggg before it was cool (20 years ago or so?) but I don’t think I could handle the quick run at it that is so popular now. I want to take time, slow down, learn something about them and determine if I want to hear their opinions/snoring for the rest of my life. LOL I love the concept of this conference! So fun.

    Reply
  44. I miss manners. Courtesy and respect. Those things would be greatly appreciated in modern times. I would not want the strictures (being female) or the hygienic/medical practices of the time though. Dating…I met my husband online in a pen pal chat room loonnnnggg before it was cool (20 years ago or so?) but I don’t think I could handle the quick run at it that is so popular now. I want to take time, slow down, learn something about them and determine if I want to hear their opinions/snoring for the rest of my life. LOL I love the concept of this conference! So fun.

    Reply
  45. I miss manners. Courtesy and respect. Those things would be greatly appreciated in modern times. I would not want the strictures (being female) or the hygienic/medical practices of the time though. Dating…I met my husband online in a pen pal chat room loonnnnggg before it was cool (20 years ago or so?) but I don’t think I could handle the quick run at it that is so popular now. I want to take time, slow down, learn something about them and determine if I want to hear their opinions/snoring for the rest of my life. LOL I love the concept of this conference! So fun.

    Reply
  46. Thank you so much – you shared an event that was obviously fun and educational and something I would have loved to attend.

    Reply
  47. Thank you so much – you shared an event that was obviously fun and educational and something I would have loved to attend.

    Reply
  48. Thank you so much – you shared an event that was obviously fun and educational and something I would have loved to attend.

    Reply
  49. Thank you so much – you shared an event that was obviously fun and educational and something I would have loved to attend.

    Reply
  50. Thank you so much – you shared an event that was obviously fun and educational and something I would have loved to attend.

    Reply
  51. Oh how I wish I could attend an event like you spoke of. The subjects are both interesting and fun. Besides manners in general returning to a more respectful time, I think courtship would be better employed today if it ever came back. Getting to know someone slowly, even granted that suitors wanting that big dowry are going to put out a rather glossy front to their real personalities, would really be helpful in today’s world.
    In some Regencies I’ve read, depending upon the wealth of the parents, a suitor’s background would be investigated. Even in rural areas with a close-knit community the parents would have had years to observe the kind of man who wants to marry their daughter. Then there was that vast middle ground area where the parents had to hope for the best. Anyway that was another layer of protection in addition to chaperonage.
    Hey! I loved Beauvalett!!! My favorites shift around from year to year, but I have a few that always stay on the top tier. Thanks for such a great post, Nicola.

    Reply
  52. Oh how I wish I could attend an event like you spoke of. The subjects are both interesting and fun. Besides manners in general returning to a more respectful time, I think courtship would be better employed today if it ever came back. Getting to know someone slowly, even granted that suitors wanting that big dowry are going to put out a rather glossy front to their real personalities, would really be helpful in today’s world.
    In some Regencies I’ve read, depending upon the wealth of the parents, a suitor’s background would be investigated. Even in rural areas with a close-knit community the parents would have had years to observe the kind of man who wants to marry their daughter. Then there was that vast middle ground area where the parents had to hope for the best. Anyway that was another layer of protection in addition to chaperonage.
    Hey! I loved Beauvalett!!! My favorites shift around from year to year, but I have a few that always stay on the top tier. Thanks for such a great post, Nicola.

    Reply
  53. Oh how I wish I could attend an event like you spoke of. The subjects are both interesting and fun. Besides manners in general returning to a more respectful time, I think courtship would be better employed today if it ever came back. Getting to know someone slowly, even granted that suitors wanting that big dowry are going to put out a rather glossy front to their real personalities, would really be helpful in today’s world.
    In some Regencies I’ve read, depending upon the wealth of the parents, a suitor’s background would be investigated. Even in rural areas with a close-knit community the parents would have had years to observe the kind of man who wants to marry their daughter. Then there was that vast middle ground area where the parents had to hope for the best. Anyway that was another layer of protection in addition to chaperonage.
    Hey! I loved Beauvalett!!! My favorites shift around from year to year, but I have a few that always stay on the top tier. Thanks for such a great post, Nicola.

    Reply
  54. Oh how I wish I could attend an event like you spoke of. The subjects are both interesting and fun. Besides manners in general returning to a more respectful time, I think courtship would be better employed today if it ever came back. Getting to know someone slowly, even granted that suitors wanting that big dowry are going to put out a rather glossy front to their real personalities, would really be helpful in today’s world.
    In some Regencies I’ve read, depending upon the wealth of the parents, a suitor’s background would be investigated. Even in rural areas with a close-knit community the parents would have had years to observe the kind of man who wants to marry their daughter. Then there was that vast middle ground area where the parents had to hope for the best. Anyway that was another layer of protection in addition to chaperonage.
    Hey! I loved Beauvalett!!! My favorites shift around from year to year, but I have a few that always stay on the top tier. Thanks for such a great post, Nicola.

    Reply
  55. Oh how I wish I could attend an event like you spoke of. The subjects are both interesting and fun. Besides manners in general returning to a more respectful time, I think courtship would be better employed today if it ever came back. Getting to know someone slowly, even granted that suitors wanting that big dowry are going to put out a rather glossy front to their real personalities, would really be helpful in today’s world.
    In some Regencies I’ve read, depending upon the wealth of the parents, a suitor’s background would be investigated. Even in rural areas with a close-knit community the parents would have had years to observe the kind of man who wants to marry their daughter. Then there was that vast middle ground area where the parents had to hope for the best. Anyway that was another layer of protection in addition to chaperonage.
    Hey! I loved Beauvalett!!! My favorites shift around from year to year, but I have a few that always stay on the top tier. Thanks for such a great post, Nicola.

    Reply
  56. Loved this post and the links. You were sooo lucky to get to go. Maybe I need to go on a GH binge. I have all the books and it would be a fun way to pass the summer.

    Reply
  57. Loved this post and the links. You were sooo lucky to get to go. Maybe I need to go on a GH binge. I have all the books and it would be a fun way to pass the summer.

    Reply
  58. Loved this post and the links. You were sooo lucky to get to go. Maybe I need to go on a GH binge. I have all the books and it would be a fun way to pass the summer.

    Reply
  59. Loved this post and the links. You were sooo lucky to get to go. Maybe I need to go on a GH binge. I have all the books and it would be a fun way to pass the summer.

    Reply
  60. Loved this post and the links. You were sooo lucky to get to go. Maybe I need to go on a GH binge. I have all the books and it would be a fun way to pass the summer.

    Reply
  61. Everyone’s commenting that they’d prefer to take more time with courtship, as was done back then. Yet, with longer life expectancies, we have far more time now than they ever did. Ironic, that.

    Reply
  62. Everyone’s commenting that they’d prefer to take more time with courtship, as was done back then. Yet, with longer life expectancies, we have far more time now than they ever did. Ironic, that.

    Reply
  63. Everyone’s commenting that they’d prefer to take more time with courtship, as was done back then. Yet, with longer life expectancies, we have far more time now than they ever did. Ironic, that.

    Reply
  64. Everyone’s commenting that they’d prefer to take more time with courtship, as was done back then. Yet, with longer life expectancies, we have far more time now than they ever did. Ironic, that.

    Reply
  65. Everyone’s commenting that they’d prefer to take more time with courtship, as was done back then. Yet, with longer life expectancies, we have far more time now than they ever did. Ironic, that.

    Reply
  66. Hi Liz! A lot of people recommend A Civil Contract, my favourite is Devil’s Cub and I also like The Talisman Ring and The Quiet Gentleman and Pistols for Two, the short story collection. But everyone has their favourite and other people will no doubt recommend others!

    Reply
  67. Hi Liz! A lot of people recommend A Civil Contract, my favourite is Devil’s Cub and I also like The Talisman Ring and The Quiet Gentleman and Pistols for Two, the short story collection. But everyone has their favourite and other people will no doubt recommend others!

    Reply
  68. Hi Liz! A lot of people recommend A Civil Contract, my favourite is Devil’s Cub and I also like The Talisman Ring and The Quiet Gentleman and Pistols for Two, the short story collection. But everyone has their favourite and other people will no doubt recommend others!

    Reply
  69. Hi Liz! A lot of people recommend A Civil Contract, my favourite is Devil’s Cub and I also like The Talisman Ring and The Quiet Gentleman and Pistols for Two, the short story collection. But everyone has their favourite and other people will no doubt recommend others!

    Reply
  70. Hi Liz! A lot of people recommend A Civil Contract, my favourite is Devil’s Cub and I also like The Talisman Ring and The Quiet Gentleman and Pistols for Two, the short story collection. But everyone has their favourite and other people will no doubt recommend others!

    Reply
  71. Hi Stephanie, I love that you met your husband online long before it was cool! Congratulations! Yes,I think the dating thing is all very speeded up now. Like you, I miss manners and respect. It would be lovely if people slowed down and there was time for courtesy.

    Reply
  72. Hi Stephanie, I love that you met your husband online long before it was cool! Congratulations! Yes,I think the dating thing is all very speeded up now. Like you, I miss manners and respect. It would be lovely if people slowed down and there was time for courtesy.

    Reply
  73. Hi Stephanie, I love that you met your husband online long before it was cool! Congratulations! Yes,I think the dating thing is all very speeded up now. Like you, I miss manners and respect. It would be lovely if people slowed down and there was time for courtesy.

    Reply
  74. Hi Stephanie, I love that you met your husband online long before it was cool! Congratulations! Yes,I think the dating thing is all very speeded up now. Like you, I miss manners and respect. It would be lovely if people slowed down and there was time for courtesy.

    Reply
  75. Hi Stephanie, I love that you met your husband online long before it was cool! Congratulations! Yes,I think the dating thing is all very speeded up now. Like you, I miss manners and respect. It would be lovely if people slowed down and there was time for courtesy.

    Reply
  76. I’m so pleased to find another Beauvallet fan, Michelle! I think there was surprise in the room when I said I liked it because it was Elizabethan, not Regency, but I loved the characters and the plot was fun.
    I so agree about taking time to get to know someone. I know that doesn’t guarantee things will work out but it does help!

    Reply
  77. I’m so pleased to find another Beauvallet fan, Michelle! I think there was surprise in the room when I said I liked it because it was Elizabethan, not Regency, but I loved the characters and the plot was fun.
    I so agree about taking time to get to know someone. I know that doesn’t guarantee things will work out but it does help!

    Reply
  78. I’m so pleased to find another Beauvallet fan, Michelle! I think there was surprise in the room when I said I liked it because it was Elizabethan, not Regency, but I loved the characters and the plot was fun.
    I so agree about taking time to get to know someone. I know that doesn’t guarantee things will work out but it does help!

    Reply
  79. I’m so pleased to find another Beauvallet fan, Michelle! I think there was surprise in the room when I said I liked it because it was Elizabethan, not Regency, but I loved the characters and the plot was fun.
    I so agree about taking time to get to know someone. I know that doesn’t guarantee things will work out but it does help!

    Reply
  80. I’m so pleased to find another Beauvallet fan, Michelle! I think there was surprise in the room when I said I liked it because it was Elizabethan, not Regency, but I loved the characters and the plot was fun.
    I so agree about taking time to get to know someone. I know that doesn’t guarantee things will work out but it does help!

    Reply

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