Of Kilts & Scots & Regencies

PlaidsporranSusan here, and Nicola too —

Time zones make a phone call between Maryland and Oxfordshire a bit tricky to manage — but sometimes Wenches just want to talk to each other! Recently Nicola and I chatted about our shared love of Scotland and Scottish-set fiction — and about Nicola's new release, The Lady and the Laird, available on July 30.

We compared weather notes (hot and humid here, surprisingly hot and humid over there) — and we had a fun discussion about researching, writing and visiting Scotland. Nicola is warm and charming, with a classic British accent that I could listen to for hours! Part of our conversation is transcripted below.  

First, about her wonderful new book: 



Laird_350The Lady and the Laird, Nicola Cornick's first Scottish-set Regency, is every bit as warm, witty, evocative and charming as Nicola's other novels, with the added romance of Scotland. And Nicola knows her Scotland — she has family ties and visits there often, and her love of Scotland shines in her work.

Yorkshire-born Nicola Cornick studied history at London University and Ruskin College, Oxford. In addition to writing, she is a historian for the National Trust at 17th century Ashdown House. A triple nominee for the RITA Award, Nicola is "a rising star of the Regency genre," declares Publishers Weekly.  

The Lady and the Laird: A bluestocking renowned for her wit and beauty secretly writes love
letters for others, letters that become more racy — until Lucy MacMorland's meddling brings her into conflict with Robert, Marquis of Methven, who has no time to woo
another bride–but since Lucy lost him a wife, it seems only right that she should marry him instead, help save his estates and his people from disaster . . .  

"Lively dialogue and sexy cat and mouse games
combine with poignancy and tenderness,” says
Romantic Times Book Club, and Publishers Weekly calls it "an entertaining Regency-era spin on Cyrano de Bergerac."
 

Susan:  Nicola, I so loved this book! Thank you for sending a copy. Have you finished writing the other two books in this new trilogy? 

Nicola:  The first book in the Scottish Brides series, The Lady and the Laird, is just out in July. The second book, One Night with a Laird, is finished and in production to be released in Nov 2013, and Claimed by The Laird, the third in the trilogy, I’m writing now and that will be out in Aug 2014. 

Susan: I love the titles. Why did you decide to set some of your Regency stories in Scotland, after writing Regency England so far?


IMG_7140

Nicola on Fair Isle, Scotland



Nicola:
For every book I write, I love the history and I think it’s important. I want to create a really vivid structure and background for the romance. And It was very interesting to set a Regency in Scotland. I think in
part the stories are a reflection of the Scotland that people want to see and
love best. It may sound odd, but Brigadoon was an inspiration in a way, as I
always think of that film as magical and it brings out the bits of Scotland
that people love. 

Susan:  And yet The Lady and the Laird isn’t really Brigadoony, is it. Not in the sense
of being an invented Scottish stereotype. It’s such a romantic story, and I thought what you wrote was very sincerely done, very true to the era –- early 19th century Scotland. 

I’ve written several novels set in 19th century Scotland, as
Susan King and as Sarah Gabriel, so I know the challenges you’re up
against — Regency Scotland is a very romantic time in
many ways, and yet there are the Clearances and so forth going on at the same time and you want
to be true to the history, you don’t want to ignore what’s happening in Scotland then, but you don't want to focus on it either. It doesn’t fit a historical romance, does it.

Nicola:  Thank you, I’m so glad you think The Lady and the Laird is true to the era. I’ve
enjoyed your Regency Scottish novels immensely and I think you are exactly
right that there are more difficult elements in Scottish history that can’t be
ignored. That’s one of the reasons I find the era so fascinating. There is such
a mixture of the romantic and the harsh.

Susan:  Oh, well said! But Regency aside, what is it about Scotland for you in particular?


IMG_7166

Gorgeous! Fair Isle, Scotland



Nicola:
 I like to think I’m a straight-down-the-line historian, but at the
same time I’m also such a romantic so there is a real dichotomy there. The
picturesque romance of Scotland really draws me. There is that kind of romantic
inspiration – and there’s being part of a kinship group that adds to that
romantic flavor. Maybe that romantic Scotland is in part a construct, but the
idea of the homecoming is strong there, and has a strong pull for others. And
it does for me. I’m English, but I have personal ties to Scotland — MacIntosh
relatives on my side, and also my husband’s family is Scottish. So I have lots
of connections to the place as well as a feeling of romantic attachment.

Susan:  I know what you mean. My grandmother was born in Scotland and came here with her family when she was young. They were Frasers and Catholic, not uncommon even then for Highland families. She had certain ways,
like cooking up a big kettle of porridge every morning before dawn and keeping
that on the stove, and other little things she would do and say (and the Fraser
dimples and red hair!) that came from her roots. It was nice to see her connection, and I feel that connection, too, partly because of
her.

Nicola:  I think these connections are very powerful for people. My
mother-in-law still sounds Scottish, still keeps the traditions too, like the
cooking and in forms of speech. My husband uses those Scottish words, too, but in
a very classic British accent, which at first sounded strange to me! I think
heritage helps so much to make you the person you are – and the strong appeal
of the Scots being your people in a sense, it’s so important to belong
somewhere, to feel that you’re part of something. I’m very interested in this
idea of people belonging to something, and belonging somewhere. Like getting
DNA samples done – I don’t know about the States, but over here, it’s very big
at the moment to find out if you really do have Viking genes in your DNA, that
sort of thing.
 


CastlescotlandSusan:
 I’m so interested in that as well, I’d love to get that done! In Scotland, with clan structure developing early on in their history, kinship was such a strong factor that it contributes a great deal to that sense of
homecoming, that sense of belonging in Scotland. It was a hugely important
aspect for the clans and it meant their ability to survive, in those early
centuries. Yet it is so inherent to the Scots that we can still
feel that identity today regardless of where we live. I love feeling that i'm welcome somewhere in Scotland
just by virtue of being part Fraser.

Nicola:  It’s all part of the bigger picture, isn’t it, you often feel so
attracted to where your family comes from. It’s like in the Gaelic, people
don’t ask “Where are you from?” but rather “Who are your people?”  I think we feel that in the Scottish romances
– if you’re drawn to Scotland and stories set there, it’s a very warm sort of
feeling that you have a place in the world, and it’s there.

Susan: Yes, the Gaelic – what a great point! With Lucy and Robert in The Lady and the
Laird,
this really informed Robert’s character, didn’t it, this sense of
belonging. It was so important to him, to his sense of himself, and helped him understand what he wanted and who he was.

Nicola:  Oh very much. Robert had gone abroad and had come home again, and
there’s a strong pull that he felt about bringing the people back and
preserving their livelihood and their heritage. He has turned his back on that
in the past but now he now he feels he owes it to his people to give them his
protection. I set this part of the story on Golden Isle in the book, which I
very much modeled on Fair Isle in the northeast of Scotland. Robert is trying
to reverse the damage done by his grandfather to the clan lands during the
Clearances.


Glencoe_susan

Glencoe (Susan's photo)


I had studied the history of the Clearances for my Master’s, and it
felt to me when I was reading the history, that so many were milking the land,
with the landowners in the south rather than up in the north on the land
itself, just milking the land in Scotland for profit. And that doesn’t fit the
romantic picture of Scotland. I wanted to reverse that through Robert’s
character.

 

Susan:  It’s true, and this touches on what I love most about the Scots and
about writing Scottish-set stories – there’s such a sense of honor inherent in the
Scots, even when things are not going so well. It's inherent to them.

Nicola:  Absolutely! Scots did live so much on ideals – and it’s not just
the ideal and the “creation” of Scotland, it really did exist, you see it all
through their history.

Susan:  So true! You see it in the Clearances, the touches of
heroism despite tragedy and adversity—like the
MacDonald chief who put everything he had, lost his
fortune, in a heroic effort to keep his people in that part of
the Hebrides rather than send them packing, as happened too often in Scotland
during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. I based a
book on that, one of my Sarah Gabriel stories—that heroism, that nobility is all through Scottish history, and I find it so attractive in heroes,
and in the stories themselves. I try to bring that sense of integrity into all my Scottish
stories and heroes.

Nicola: Oh I know exactly what you mean. That loyalty and nobility is a
hugely attractive characteristic in heroes of Scottish set romance. I was just
reading about that recently—MacDonald of Clan Ranald going bankrupt for his
people, yes. And though the structure around them might change, the social
structures, the strong principle remains. It goes back to the clans. And it’s
of course not exclusive to the Scots, but it’s a very powerful force and
characteristic in them.

Susan:  It exists very much in the Bruce and Wallace era, too. I’ve
written about that in several books — loving that Scottish ability to thumb their noses at authority, to maintain their sense of humor and their nobility
despite awful circumstances. You
see it in the whisky smugglers too, and I've written more than one
whisky smuggler hero for that reason—I love the creative way they had of expressing their freedom no matter what the
circumstances. Many Scottish smugglers were pretty dreadful, let's be real — but some
had a great mischief in the way they went about producing their whisky no matter what English law dictated.

Nicola: Right, my third book in the series (Claimed By the Laird, 2014) has to do with whisky
smugglers, and it’s such fun to write. It was a good use of their brains, too,
the smuggling, when there were so many left with little to do, and so many
regulations to follow. I love that refusal to just lie down and accept
authority. It’s so interesting to write these things.


Urquhart_susan

Susan's try at a postcard view of Castle Urquhart


Susan: 
When Prof. Euan Hague visited the blog to talk about his research
into the appeal of Scottish romance, we talked about how Sir Walter Scott had something to do with creating that sort of “conceit” of
Romantic Scotland, the picturesque romance of the vast, rugged beauty of the
landscape, the noble tartan-clad Highland savage, all that, and it ties in with
King George’s visit to Edinburgh, doing it up right for the king.

 

Nicola: Euan Hague’s interview was fascinating! The whole thing about the
clan tartans interests me —many people don’t even realize that it was all
pretty much invented in about 1815, that if your clan has a specific tartan, it
may have come about then and not earlier.

Susan: Right, early on a tartan design and its colors had more to do with
the dyes available from the local plants in that area, and less to do with a
specific color or pattern identifying a clan group. The local colors were more
likely to identify you, and a weaver’s style, and that led eventually to clan
tartan identification.
 


IMG_7303

A bit windy on Fair Isle!


Nicola: 
That’s fascinating. I’m very conscious when I’m writing Scottish
Regency romance that in some sense I’m writing within the illusion, carrying on
that construct that was created about Scotland. And yet, so much of it has
roots in the Scottish culture, and so much of it evokes the real Scotland.
There really is a picturesque romance in the vast rugged beauty of the Scottish
landscape, isn’t there! I don’t want it to seem like a construct.

 

Susan: Oh it doesn’t at all! I think what you’re writing is very sincere,
very well done. I love what you’re doing with your new Regency Scotland series!

Nicola:  Thank you so much, Susan. And it’s been wonderful to talk about
Scotland and the Scottish Brides series with you!


Laird_uk_350Susan:
Thanks, Nicola, great talking with you — best of luck with the book and the trilogy!

The Lady and the Laird has a UK version too, which will be released in September - click here for Amazon UK!

What attracts YOU to Scottish Regency stories? Is it the Scottish setting, the Scottish heroes — or is it Regency first and foremost for you, and any old setting will do? Commenters on this blog will be entered for a chance to win a copy of Nicola's The Lady and the Laird!  

Susan 

 

  

 

220 thoughts on “Of Kilts & Scots & Regencies”

  1. Good {early} morning, dear Wenches,
    I must confess that I burnt the midnight oil something firece this early dawn of day completely consumed by the typosphere and the appealment of seeking out others’ enchanted by the dearly beloved typewriter! I’ve uncovered a French period drama film; a documentary of said typewriters; and a entire counter-culture community of like-minded enthused souls,…I decided that before I turn in whilst the rest of the world is starting to awaken I’d duck over here and see if a new post went live,… blessedly I found a wicked sweet Scot-minded post that I will seriously need to scope out once my eyes have re-alighted themselves during much needed sleep! Until then, know that I love dropping by this blog, as it’s quite the treat for me as much as I presume it is for all of your dear readers near and far!
    {postscript: I simply smiled knowingly about the time/differences,… try EST to LONDON OR New Zealand,… I once woke up a friends’ Mum @3:30a as I mistook the time,… she actually stayed on for the conversation!}

  2. Good {early} morning, dear Wenches,
    I must confess that I burnt the midnight oil something firece this early dawn of day completely consumed by the typosphere and the appealment of seeking out others’ enchanted by the dearly beloved typewriter! I’ve uncovered a French period drama film; a documentary of said typewriters; and a entire counter-culture community of like-minded enthused souls,…I decided that before I turn in whilst the rest of the world is starting to awaken I’d duck over here and see if a new post went live,… blessedly I found a wicked sweet Scot-minded post that I will seriously need to scope out once my eyes have re-alighted themselves during much needed sleep! Until then, know that I love dropping by this blog, as it’s quite the treat for me as much as I presume it is for all of your dear readers near and far!
    {postscript: I simply smiled knowingly about the time/differences,… try EST to LONDON OR New Zealand,… I once woke up a friends’ Mum @3:30a as I mistook the time,… she actually stayed on for the conversation!}

  3. Good {early} morning, dear Wenches,
    I must confess that I burnt the midnight oil something firece this early dawn of day completely consumed by the typosphere and the appealment of seeking out others’ enchanted by the dearly beloved typewriter! I’ve uncovered a French period drama film; a documentary of said typewriters; and a entire counter-culture community of like-minded enthused souls,…I decided that before I turn in whilst the rest of the world is starting to awaken I’d duck over here and see if a new post went live,… blessedly I found a wicked sweet Scot-minded post that I will seriously need to scope out once my eyes have re-alighted themselves during much needed sleep! Until then, know that I love dropping by this blog, as it’s quite the treat for me as much as I presume it is for all of your dear readers near and far!
    {postscript: I simply smiled knowingly about the time/differences,… try EST to LONDON OR New Zealand,… I once woke up a friends’ Mum @3:30a as I mistook the time,… she actually stayed on for the conversation!}

  4. Good {early} morning, dear Wenches,
    I must confess that I burnt the midnight oil something firece this early dawn of day completely consumed by the typosphere and the appealment of seeking out others’ enchanted by the dearly beloved typewriter! I’ve uncovered a French period drama film; a documentary of said typewriters; and a entire counter-culture community of like-minded enthused souls,…I decided that before I turn in whilst the rest of the world is starting to awaken I’d duck over here and see if a new post went live,… blessedly I found a wicked sweet Scot-minded post that I will seriously need to scope out once my eyes have re-alighted themselves during much needed sleep! Until then, know that I love dropping by this blog, as it’s quite the treat for me as much as I presume it is for all of your dear readers near and far!
    {postscript: I simply smiled knowingly about the time/differences,… try EST to LONDON OR New Zealand,… I once woke up a friends’ Mum @3:30a as I mistook the time,… she actually stayed on for the conversation!}

  5. Good {early} morning, dear Wenches,
    I must confess that I burnt the midnight oil something firece this early dawn of day completely consumed by the typosphere and the appealment of seeking out others’ enchanted by the dearly beloved typewriter! I’ve uncovered a French period drama film; a documentary of said typewriters; and a entire counter-culture community of like-minded enthused souls,…I decided that before I turn in whilst the rest of the world is starting to awaken I’d duck over here and see if a new post went live,… blessedly I found a wicked sweet Scot-minded post that I will seriously need to scope out once my eyes have re-alighted themselves during much needed sleep! Until then, know that I love dropping by this blog, as it’s quite the treat for me as much as I presume it is for all of your dear readers near and far!
    {postscript: I simply smiled knowingly about the time/differences,… try EST to LONDON OR New Zealand,… I once woke up a friends’ Mum @3:30a as I mistook the time,… she actually stayed on for the conversation!}

  6. Wonderful post, ladies! I’m in love with all things Scottish too and find it hard to pinpoint exactly why – just being there makes you feel the romantic atmosphere and hearing the lovely accent certainly helps! I have no family ties to Scotland, but still feel at home there for some reason. It’s just an amazing place!
    (No need to enter me for the draw, I already have a copy of Nicola’s book waiting on my TBR pile)

  7. Wonderful post, ladies! I’m in love with all things Scottish too and find it hard to pinpoint exactly why – just being there makes you feel the romantic atmosphere and hearing the lovely accent certainly helps! I have no family ties to Scotland, but still feel at home there for some reason. It’s just an amazing place!
    (No need to enter me for the draw, I already have a copy of Nicola’s book waiting on my TBR pile)

  8. Wonderful post, ladies! I’m in love with all things Scottish too and find it hard to pinpoint exactly why – just being there makes you feel the romantic atmosphere and hearing the lovely accent certainly helps! I have no family ties to Scotland, but still feel at home there for some reason. It’s just an amazing place!
    (No need to enter me for the draw, I already have a copy of Nicola’s book waiting on my TBR pile)

  9. Wonderful post, ladies! I’m in love with all things Scottish too and find it hard to pinpoint exactly why – just being there makes you feel the romantic atmosphere and hearing the lovely accent certainly helps! I have no family ties to Scotland, but still feel at home there for some reason. It’s just an amazing place!
    (No need to enter me for the draw, I already have a copy of Nicola’s book waiting on my TBR pile)

  10. Wonderful post, ladies! I’m in love with all things Scottish too and find it hard to pinpoint exactly why – just being there makes you feel the romantic atmosphere and hearing the lovely accent certainly helps! I have no family ties to Scotland, but still feel at home there for some reason. It’s just an amazing place!
    (No need to enter me for the draw, I already have a copy of Nicola’s book waiting on my TBR pile)

  11. Good morning/evening, Jorie! You have indeed been burning the midnight oil, but what a wonderful variety of sites you must have been checking out!
    Hi Christina! Thank you so much for stopping by. Your own books so perfectly capture the spirit of Scotland. I agree there is something about the place that grabs the imagination. I hope you enjoy the book!

  12. Good morning/evening, Jorie! You have indeed been burning the midnight oil, but what a wonderful variety of sites you must have been checking out!
    Hi Christina! Thank you so much for stopping by. Your own books so perfectly capture the spirit of Scotland. I agree there is something about the place that grabs the imagination. I hope you enjoy the book!

  13. Good morning/evening, Jorie! You have indeed been burning the midnight oil, but what a wonderful variety of sites you must have been checking out!
    Hi Christina! Thank you so much for stopping by. Your own books so perfectly capture the spirit of Scotland. I agree there is something about the place that grabs the imagination. I hope you enjoy the book!

  14. Good morning/evening, Jorie! You have indeed been burning the midnight oil, but what a wonderful variety of sites you must have been checking out!
    Hi Christina! Thank you so much for stopping by. Your own books so perfectly capture the spirit of Scotland. I agree there is something about the place that grabs the imagination. I hope you enjoy the book!

  15. Good morning/evening, Jorie! You have indeed been burning the midnight oil, but what a wonderful variety of sites you must have been checking out!
    Hi Christina! Thank you so much for stopping by. Your own books so perfectly capture the spirit of Scotland. I agree there is something about the place that grabs the imagination. I hope you enjoy the book!

  16. I do admit I like all historical romances regardless but there’s a certain charm in Scottish ones. They seem more earthy & somewhat mystical at times.

  17. I do admit I like all historical romances regardless but there’s a certain charm in Scottish ones. They seem more earthy & somewhat mystical at times.

  18. I do admit I like all historical romances regardless but there’s a certain charm in Scottish ones. They seem more earthy & somewhat mystical at times.

  19. I do admit I like all historical romances regardless but there’s a certain charm in Scottish ones. They seem more earthy & somewhat mystical at times.

  20. I do admit I like all historical romances regardless but there’s a certain charm in Scottish ones. They seem more earthy & somewhat mystical at times.

  21. Hi Linda! I think both those things are very true. There is a rugged earthiness about a Scottish set story as well as that mystical element which is what I really meant when I spoke about Brigadoon – a sort of magical quality. That was what I was aiming for, anyway!

  22. Hi Linda! I think both those things are very true. There is a rugged earthiness about a Scottish set story as well as that mystical element which is what I really meant when I spoke about Brigadoon – a sort of magical quality. That was what I was aiming for, anyway!

  23. Hi Linda! I think both those things are very true. There is a rugged earthiness about a Scottish set story as well as that mystical element which is what I really meant when I spoke about Brigadoon – a sort of magical quality. That was what I was aiming for, anyway!

  24. Hi Linda! I think both those things are very true. There is a rugged earthiness about a Scottish set story as well as that mystical element which is what I really meant when I spoke about Brigadoon – a sort of magical quality. That was what I was aiming for, anyway!

  25. Hi Linda! I think both those things are very true. There is a rugged earthiness about a Scottish set story as well as that mystical element which is what I really meant when I spoke about Brigadoon – a sort of magical quality. That was what I was aiming for, anyway!

  26. I think my love of Scotland comes from my dad’s best friend’s wife. She met him while he was serving in Britan during WWII. So I grew up knowing this lovely lady with a delightfully strange accent. She was a wonderful cook and my parents enjoyed many lovely dinners with them.

  27. I think my love of Scotland comes from my dad’s best friend’s wife. She met him while he was serving in Britan during WWII. So I grew up knowing this lovely lady with a delightfully strange accent. She was a wonderful cook and my parents enjoyed many lovely dinners with them.

  28. I think my love of Scotland comes from my dad’s best friend’s wife. She met him while he was serving in Britan during WWII. So I grew up knowing this lovely lady with a delightfully strange accent. She was a wonderful cook and my parents enjoyed many lovely dinners with them.

  29. I think my love of Scotland comes from my dad’s best friend’s wife. She met him while he was serving in Britan during WWII. So I grew up knowing this lovely lady with a delightfully strange accent. She was a wonderful cook and my parents enjoyed many lovely dinners with them.

  30. I think my love of Scotland comes from my dad’s best friend’s wife. She met him while he was serving in Britan during WWII. So I grew up knowing this lovely lady with a delightfully strange accent. She was a wonderful cook and my parents enjoyed many lovely dinners with them.

  31. Jorie, you really were burning some midnight oil! We’re so glad you love the blog, and I hope you’re getting some well-earned rest right now.
    Christina, I so agree – the romantic atmosphere and the accents – who could resist?!
    And Linda, yes, that mysticism and earth connection really draws me too. I’ve always included a touch of the otherworldly in my Scottish books – it just doesn’t feel complete to me without it. I think the landscape, that earthly bond, has helped shape the independent and resourceful character of the Scots over centuries. One of the best qualities a Scottish hero can have, I think, is an earthy quality, a combination of groundedness and practicality, as well as great love and respect for the land.
    Nicola, I would talk to you again about Scotland any time – and it’s my turn for the phone tab! *g*

  32. Jorie, you really were burning some midnight oil! We’re so glad you love the blog, and I hope you’re getting some well-earned rest right now.
    Christina, I so agree – the romantic atmosphere and the accents – who could resist?!
    And Linda, yes, that mysticism and earth connection really draws me too. I’ve always included a touch of the otherworldly in my Scottish books – it just doesn’t feel complete to me without it. I think the landscape, that earthly bond, has helped shape the independent and resourceful character of the Scots over centuries. One of the best qualities a Scottish hero can have, I think, is an earthy quality, a combination of groundedness and practicality, as well as great love and respect for the land.
    Nicola, I would talk to you again about Scotland any time – and it’s my turn for the phone tab! *g*

  33. Jorie, you really were burning some midnight oil! We’re so glad you love the blog, and I hope you’re getting some well-earned rest right now.
    Christina, I so agree – the romantic atmosphere and the accents – who could resist?!
    And Linda, yes, that mysticism and earth connection really draws me too. I’ve always included a touch of the otherworldly in my Scottish books – it just doesn’t feel complete to me without it. I think the landscape, that earthly bond, has helped shape the independent and resourceful character of the Scots over centuries. One of the best qualities a Scottish hero can have, I think, is an earthy quality, a combination of groundedness and practicality, as well as great love and respect for the land.
    Nicola, I would talk to you again about Scotland any time – and it’s my turn for the phone tab! *g*

  34. Jorie, you really were burning some midnight oil! We’re so glad you love the blog, and I hope you’re getting some well-earned rest right now.
    Christina, I so agree – the romantic atmosphere and the accents – who could resist?!
    And Linda, yes, that mysticism and earth connection really draws me too. I’ve always included a touch of the otherworldly in my Scottish books – it just doesn’t feel complete to me without it. I think the landscape, that earthly bond, has helped shape the independent and resourceful character of the Scots over centuries. One of the best qualities a Scottish hero can have, I think, is an earthy quality, a combination of groundedness and practicality, as well as great love and respect for the land.
    Nicola, I would talk to you again about Scotland any time – and it’s my turn for the phone tab! *g*

  35. Jorie, you really were burning some midnight oil! We’re so glad you love the blog, and I hope you’re getting some well-earned rest right now.
    Christina, I so agree – the romantic atmosphere and the accents – who could resist?!
    And Linda, yes, that mysticism and earth connection really draws me too. I’ve always included a touch of the otherworldly in my Scottish books – it just doesn’t feel complete to me without it. I think the landscape, that earthly bond, has helped shape the independent and resourceful character of the Scots over centuries. One of the best qualities a Scottish hero can have, I think, is an earthy quality, a combination of groundedness and practicality, as well as great love and respect for the land.
    Nicola, I would talk to you again about Scotland any time – and it’s my turn for the phone tab! *g*

  36. That does it–we HAVE to have a Word Wench tour of Scotland! And maybe including a cruise to all those wonderful islands: Orkneys, Shetlands, Fair Isle. Sigh. So much more fun to imagine being in Scotland than home and working hard in humid Maryland! Thanks to you both for a delicious blog.

  37. That does it–we HAVE to have a Word Wench tour of Scotland! And maybe including a cruise to all those wonderful islands: Orkneys, Shetlands, Fair Isle. Sigh. So much more fun to imagine being in Scotland than home and working hard in humid Maryland! Thanks to you both for a delicious blog.

  38. That does it–we HAVE to have a Word Wench tour of Scotland! And maybe including a cruise to all those wonderful islands: Orkneys, Shetlands, Fair Isle. Sigh. So much more fun to imagine being in Scotland than home and working hard in humid Maryland! Thanks to you both for a delicious blog.

  39. That does it–we HAVE to have a Word Wench tour of Scotland! And maybe including a cruise to all those wonderful islands: Orkneys, Shetlands, Fair Isle. Sigh. So much more fun to imagine being in Scotland than home and working hard in humid Maryland! Thanks to you both for a delicious blog.

  40. That does it–we HAVE to have a Word Wench tour of Scotland! And maybe including a cruise to all those wonderful islands: Orkneys, Shetlands, Fair Isle. Sigh. So much more fun to imagine being in Scotland than home and working hard in humid Maryland! Thanks to you both for a delicious blog.

  41. Cate, that sounds wonderful. I love the idea of you growing up and hearing that accent – and eating the great food! I love Scottish food. I even like haggis. I’ve just posted up a recipe for Montrose biscuits on my own blog and I think I’ve just convinced the dh to make Scottish morning rolls for breakfast tomorrow. Yum!

  42. Cate, that sounds wonderful. I love the idea of you growing up and hearing that accent – and eating the great food! I love Scottish food. I even like haggis. I’ve just posted up a recipe for Montrose biscuits on my own blog and I think I’ve just convinced the dh to make Scottish morning rolls for breakfast tomorrow. Yum!

  43. Cate, that sounds wonderful. I love the idea of you growing up and hearing that accent – and eating the great food! I love Scottish food. I even like haggis. I’ve just posted up a recipe for Montrose biscuits on my own blog and I think I’ve just convinced the dh to make Scottish morning rolls for breakfast tomorrow. Yum!

  44. Cate, that sounds wonderful. I love the idea of you growing up and hearing that accent – and eating the great food! I love Scottish food. I even like haggis. I’ve just posted up a recipe for Montrose biscuits on my own blog and I think I’ve just convinced the dh to make Scottish morning rolls for breakfast tomorrow. Yum!

  45. Cate, that sounds wonderful. I love the idea of you growing up and hearing that accent – and eating the great food! I love Scottish food. I even like haggis. I’ve just posted up a recipe for Montrose biscuits on my own blog and I think I’ve just convinced the dh to make Scottish morning rolls for breakfast tomorrow. Yum!

  46. Oh, yes please, Mary Jo! Whilst we were on Fair Isle a cruise ship came in that was touring the Northern and the Western Isles. Now that would be a great Wench trip!

  47. Oh, yes please, Mary Jo! Whilst we were on Fair Isle a cruise ship came in that was touring the Northern and the Western Isles. Now that would be a great Wench trip!

  48. Oh, yes please, Mary Jo! Whilst we were on Fair Isle a cruise ship came in that was touring the Northern and the Western Isles. Now that would be a great Wench trip!

  49. Oh, yes please, Mary Jo! Whilst we were on Fair Isle a cruise ship came in that was touring the Northern and the Western Isles. Now that would be a great Wench trip!

  50. Oh, yes please, Mary Jo! Whilst we were on Fair Isle a cruise ship came in that was touring the Northern and the Western Isles. Now that would be a great Wench trip!

  51. Wench Tour, count me in! We must look into this!
    Love the food. LOVE the fish ‘n chips, the pastries, omg, the hot, fresh tea unlike anything we get here while out and about … I gotta draw the line at the haggis, though. I don’t eat meat, but I’ve nibbled at it for a taste, and it was … OK. I’m not a good judge of meaty dishes. I’ve tried the veggie haggis, and that didn’t fly with me either. I always pass my haggis portion (at Burns Suppers and when in Scotland) over to my husband. He really likes it. He’s got some MacGregor in him. 🙂

  52. Wench Tour, count me in! We must look into this!
    Love the food. LOVE the fish ‘n chips, the pastries, omg, the hot, fresh tea unlike anything we get here while out and about … I gotta draw the line at the haggis, though. I don’t eat meat, but I’ve nibbled at it for a taste, and it was … OK. I’m not a good judge of meaty dishes. I’ve tried the veggie haggis, and that didn’t fly with me either. I always pass my haggis portion (at Burns Suppers and when in Scotland) over to my husband. He really likes it. He’s got some MacGregor in him. 🙂

  53. Wench Tour, count me in! We must look into this!
    Love the food. LOVE the fish ‘n chips, the pastries, omg, the hot, fresh tea unlike anything we get here while out and about … I gotta draw the line at the haggis, though. I don’t eat meat, but I’ve nibbled at it for a taste, and it was … OK. I’m not a good judge of meaty dishes. I’ve tried the veggie haggis, and that didn’t fly with me either. I always pass my haggis portion (at Burns Suppers and when in Scotland) over to my husband. He really likes it. He’s got some MacGregor in him. 🙂

  54. Wench Tour, count me in! We must look into this!
    Love the food. LOVE the fish ‘n chips, the pastries, omg, the hot, fresh tea unlike anything we get here while out and about … I gotta draw the line at the haggis, though. I don’t eat meat, but I’ve nibbled at it for a taste, and it was … OK. I’m not a good judge of meaty dishes. I’ve tried the veggie haggis, and that didn’t fly with me either. I always pass my haggis portion (at Burns Suppers and when in Scotland) over to my husband. He really likes it. He’s got some MacGregor in him. 🙂

  55. Wench Tour, count me in! We must look into this!
    Love the food. LOVE the fish ‘n chips, the pastries, omg, the hot, fresh tea unlike anything we get here while out and about … I gotta draw the line at the haggis, though. I don’t eat meat, but I’ve nibbled at it for a taste, and it was … OK. I’m not a good judge of meaty dishes. I’ve tried the veggie haggis, and that didn’t fly with me either. I always pass my haggis portion (at Burns Suppers and when in Scotland) over to my husband. He really likes it. He’s got some MacGregor in him. 🙂

  56. Wench Tour, count me in! We must look into this!
    Love the food. LOVE the fish ‘n chips, the pastries, omg, the hot, fresh tea unlike anything we get here while out and about … I gotta draw the line at the haggis, though. I don’t eat meat, but I’ve nibbled at it for a taste, and it was … OK. I’m not a good judge of meaty dishes. I’ve tried the veggie haggis, and that didn’t fly with me either. I always pass my haggis portion (at Burns Suppers and when in Scotland) over to my husband. He really likes it. He’s got some MacGregor in him. 🙂

  57. Wench Tour, count me in! We must look into this!
    Love the food. LOVE the fish ‘n chips, the pastries, omg, the hot, fresh tea unlike anything we get here while out and about … I gotta draw the line at the haggis, though. I don’t eat meat, but I’ve nibbled at it for a taste, and it was … OK. I’m not a good judge of meaty dishes. I’ve tried the veggie haggis, and that didn’t fly with me either. I always pass my haggis portion (at Burns Suppers and when in Scotland) over to my husband. He really likes it. He’s got some MacGregor in him. 🙂

  58. Wench Tour, count me in! We must look into this!
    Love the food. LOVE the fish ‘n chips, the pastries, omg, the hot, fresh tea unlike anything we get here while out and about … I gotta draw the line at the haggis, though. I don’t eat meat, but I’ve nibbled at it for a taste, and it was … OK. I’m not a good judge of meaty dishes. I’ve tried the veggie haggis, and that didn’t fly with me either. I always pass my haggis portion (at Burns Suppers and when in Scotland) over to my husband. He really likes it. He’s got some MacGregor in him. 🙂

  59. Wench Tour, count me in! We must look into this!
    Love the food. LOVE the fish ‘n chips, the pastries, omg, the hot, fresh tea unlike anything we get here while out and about … I gotta draw the line at the haggis, though. I don’t eat meat, but I’ve nibbled at it for a taste, and it was … OK. I’m not a good judge of meaty dishes. I’ve tried the veggie haggis, and that didn’t fly with me either. I always pass my haggis portion (at Burns Suppers and when in Scotland) over to my husband. He really likes it. He’s got some MacGregor in him. 🙂

  60. Wench Tour, count me in! We must look into this!
    Love the food. LOVE the fish ‘n chips, the pastries, omg, the hot, fresh tea unlike anything we get here while out and about … I gotta draw the line at the haggis, though. I don’t eat meat, but I’ve nibbled at it for a taste, and it was … OK. I’m not a good judge of meaty dishes. I’ve tried the veggie haggis, and that didn’t fly with me either. I always pass my haggis portion (at Burns Suppers and when in Scotland) over to my husband. He really likes it. He’s got some MacGregor in him. 🙂

  61. Wow, what a fabulous post!!! Scottish setting first, Scottish characters 2nd, Regency period 3rd in order of interest. Thanks for the giveaway chance!

  62. Wow, what a fabulous post!!! Scottish setting first, Scottish characters 2nd, Regency period 3rd in order of interest. Thanks for the giveaway chance!

  63. Wow, what a fabulous post!!! Scottish setting first, Scottish characters 2nd, Regency period 3rd in order of interest. Thanks for the giveaway chance!

  64. Wow, what a fabulous post!!! Scottish setting first, Scottish characters 2nd, Regency period 3rd in order of interest. Thanks for the giveaway chance!

  65. Wow, what a fabulous post!!! Scottish setting first, Scottish characters 2nd, Regency period 3rd in order of interest. Thanks for the giveaway chance!

  66. Maybe my m-i-l makes a particularly good haggis, Susan. I must admit I was surprised that I enjoyed it but I did. I’ve never tried the deep fried Mars Bar though!
    Michelle, I am so pleased you liked the post. So you are another fan on the Scottish setting!

  67. Maybe my m-i-l makes a particularly good haggis, Susan. I must admit I was surprised that I enjoyed it but I did. I’ve never tried the deep fried Mars Bar though!
    Michelle, I am so pleased you liked the post. So you are another fan on the Scottish setting!

  68. Maybe my m-i-l makes a particularly good haggis, Susan. I must admit I was surprised that I enjoyed it but I did. I’ve never tried the deep fried Mars Bar though!
    Michelle, I am so pleased you liked the post. So you are another fan on the Scottish setting!

  69. Maybe my m-i-l makes a particularly good haggis, Susan. I must admit I was surprised that I enjoyed it but I did. I’ve never tried the deep fried Mars Bar though!
    Michelle, I am so pleased you liked the post. So you are another fan on the Scottish setting!

  70. Maybe my m-i-l makes a particularly good haggis, Susan. I must admit I was surprised that I enjoyed it but I did. I’ve never tried the deep fried Mars Bar though!
    Michelle, I am so pleased you liked the post. So you are another fan on the Scottish setting!

  71. Hallo, Hallo dear Wenches!!
    Ms. Cornick – I simply love the synergy that fuses counter-culture interests, and the typewriter enthused souls are a heap of fun! One day I’ll share the lovely links, for now, if you want to see the film trailer for *Populaire* http://www.getthefive.com/articles/the-idealist/the-typewriter-renaissancewhats-old-is-cool-again/. I cannot wait for it to go on subtitled dvd! On my 2nd viewing, I nearly heard the English through the French! It’s quirky, fiesty, and ingenius!
    Ms. King: Although I try not to be up so very dear in the early morn, it happens time to time whenever I get jazzed about an interest I want to research,…sighs.
    Reading is such a visercal experience for me, and oft times is drenched in a personal wanton hope of experiencing a particular place and time that might not be achieved IRL. Scotland is heldfast to me, on ancestral grounds and the curiosity of someone who dips into the story-telling worlds of the Gaelic and Celtic. The Highlands have always called to me, so I would say it’s the setting that acts as a divining rod, yet it’s secured in the strength of the characters! The era by which the stories evolve is secondary, as I do like to transmorph between the different historical perspectives!
    Evenso, the Regency alongside the Victorian are the time dispersements I read more readily than others, save the French Revolution! I can say the Edwardian era might compete with the French, as there is something to be said for the inertia of a new century! Although, are their Scottish historical romances set then?
    Ms. Cornick: any story now that depicts Laird life is one that I will be keen to read, now that I know a bit about its history since I saw Monarch of the Glen.
    I know exactly what you mean,…when you fall in love with a particular place it etches its mirth into the niches of your heart whereupon your not only compelled to write a story set in that locale, but it’s a place you need to be . I think when we’re able to captivate a place romatically we instantly draw forth the positive nature of what surrounds it, and lessens the impact of the negative,…never fully abated but stilled.
    One compelling difference I’ve found is that I am keenly aware of and curious about my ancestral roots, as my Mum garnished that fascination in me at a young age, but not all my friends’ understand it, as their used to only being of ‘one’ or ‘two’ countries {ie: England/Scot or French/Swiss}. I like to uncover the threads that stitch families together across centuries,…
    I am drinking up the words and history of this trilogy,…I cannot wait to soak into the words, as the narrative unfolds before me,… I like the delicate balance you laid out in being historically conscience with the flair of romantic sensibility and a good dashing of humour! Humour will always empower us to overcome adversity,…
    In closing, I simply adore the UK cover art for the simplicity and evocation of what may lie inside. Is the lucky commenter able to win the UK version?

  72. Hallo, Hallo dear Wenches!!
    Ms. Cornick – I simply love the synergy that fuses counter-culture interests, and the typewriter enthused souls are a heap of fun! One day I’ll share the lovely links, for now, if you want to see the film trailer for *Populaire* http://www.getthefive.com/articles/the-idealist/the-typewriter-renaissancewhats-old-is-cool-again/. I cannot wait for it to go on subtitled dvd! On my 2nd viewing, I nearly heard the English through the French! It’s quirky, fiesty, and ingenius!
    Ms. King: Although I try not to be up so very dear in the early morn, it happens time to time whenever I get jazzed about an interest I want to research,…sighs.
    Reading is such a visercal experience for me, and oft times is drenched in a personal wanton hope of experiencing a particular place and time that might not be achieved IRL. Scotland is heldfast to me, on ancestral grounds and the curiosity of someone who dips into the story-telling worlds of the Gaelic and Celtic. The Highlands have always called to me, so I would say it’s the setting that acts as a divining rod, yet it’s secured in the strength of the characters! The era by which the stories evolve is secondary, as I do like to transmorph between the different historical perspectives!
    Evenso, the Regency alongside the Victorian are the time dispersements I read more readily than others, save the French Revolution! I can say the Edwardian era might compete with the French, as there is something to be said for the inertia of a new century! Although, are their Scottish historical romances set then?
    Ms. Cornick: any story now that depicts Laird life is one that I will be keen to read, now that I know a bit about its history since I saw Monarch of the Glen.
    I know exactly what you mean,…when you fall in love with a particular place it etches its mirth into the niches of your heart whereupon your not only compelled to write a story set in that locale, but it’s a place you need to be . I think when we’re able to captivate a place romatically we instantly draw forth the positive nature of what surrounds it, and lessens the impact of the negative,…never fully abated but stilled.
    One compelling difference I’ve found is that I am keenly aware of and curious about my ancestral roots, as my Mum garnished that fascination in me at a young age, but not all my friends’ understand it, as their used to only being of ‘one’ or ‘two’ countries {ie: England/Scot or French/Swiss}. I like to uncover the threads that stitch families together across centuries,…
    I am drinking up the words and history of this trilogy,…I cannot wait to soak into the words, as the narrative unfolds before me,… I like the delicate balance you laid out in being historically conscience with the flair of romantic sensibility and a good dashing of humour! Humour will always empower us to overcome adversity,…
    In closing, I simply adore the UK cover art for the simplicity and evocation of what may lie inside. Is the lucky commenter able to win the UK version?

  73. Hallo, Hallo dear Wenches!!
    Ms. Cornick – I simply love the synergy that fuses counter-culture interests, and the typewriter enthused souls are a heap of fun! One day I’ll share the lovely links, for now, if you want to see the film trailer for *Populaire* http://www.getthefive.com/articles/the-idealist/the-typewriter-renaissancewhats-old-is-cool-again/. I cannot wait for it to go on subtitled dvd! On my 2nd viewing, I nearly heard the English through the French! It’s quirky, fiesty, and ingenius!
    Ms. King: Although I try not to be up so very dear in the early morn, it happens time to time whenever I get jazzed about an interest I want to research,…sighs.
    Reading is such a visercal experience for me, and oft times is drenched in a personal wanton hope of experiencing a particular place and time that might not be achieved IRL. Scotland is heldfast to me, on ancestral grounds and the curiosity of someone who dips into the story-telling worlds of the Gaelic and Celtic. The Highlands have always called to me, so I would say it’s the setting that acts as a divining rod, yet it’s secured in the strength of the characters! The era by which the stories evolve is secondary, as I do like to transmorph between the different historical perspectives!
    Evenso, the Regency alongside the Victorian are the time dispersements I read more readily than others, save the French Revolution! I can say the Edwardian era might compete with the French, as there is something to be said for the inertia of a new century! Although, are their Scottish historical romances set then?
    Ms. Cornick: any story now that depicts Laird life is one that I will be keen to read, now that I know a bit about its history since I saw Monarch of the Glen.
    I know exactly what you mean,…when you fall in love with a particular place it etches its mirth into the niches of your heart whereupon your not only compelled to write a story set in that locale, but it’s a place you need to be . I think when we’re able to captivate a place romatically we instantly draw forth the positive nature of what surrounds it, and lessens the impact of the negative,…never fully abated but stilled.
    One compelling difference I’ve found is that I am keenly aware of and curious about my ancestral roots, as my Mum garnished that fascination in me at a young age, but not all my friends’ understand it, as their used to only being of ‘one’ or ‘two’ countries {ie: England/Scot or French/Swiss}. I like to uncover the threads that stitch families together across centuries,…
    I am drinking up the words and history of this trilogy,…I cannot wait to soak into the words, as the narrative unfolds before me,… I like the delicate balance you laid out in being historically conscience with the flair of romantic sensibility and a good dashing of humour! Humour will always empower us to overcome adversity,…
    In closing, I simply adore the UK cover art for the simplicity and evocation of what may lie inside. Is the lucky commenter able to win the UK version?

  74. Hallo, Hallo dear Wenches!!
    Ms. Cornick – I simply love the synergy that fuses counter-culture interests, and the typewriter enthused souls are a heap of fun! One day I’ll share the lovely links, for now, if you want to see the film trailer for *Populaire* http://www.getthefive.com/articles/the-idealist/the-typewriter-renaissancewhats-old-is-cool-again/. I cannot wait for it to go on subtitled dvd! On my 2nd viewing, I nearly heard the English through the French! It’s quirky, fiesty, and ingenius!
    Ms. King: Although I try not to be up so very dear in the early morn, it happens time to time whenever I get jazzed about an interest I want to research,…sighs.
    Reading is such a visercal experience for me, and oft times is drenched in a personal wanton hope of experiencing a particular place and time that might not be achieved IRL. Scotland is heldfast to me, on ancestral grounds and the curiosity of someone who dips into the story-telling worlds of the Gaelic and Celtic. The Highlands have always called to me, so I would say it’s the setting that acts as a divining rod, yet it’s secured in the strength of the characters! The era by which the stories evolve is secondary, as I do like to transmorph between the different historical perspectives!
    Evenso, the Regency alongside the Victorian are the time dispersements I read more readily than others, save the French Revolution! I can say the Edwardian era might compete with the French, as there is something to be said for the inertia of a new century! Although, are their Scottish historical romances set then?
    Ms. Cornick: any story now that depicts Laird life is one that I will be keen to read, now that I know a bit about its history since I saw Monarch of the Glen.
    I know exactly what you mean,…when you fall in love with a particular place it etches its mirth into the niches of your heart whereupon your not only compelled to write a story set in that locale, but it’s a place you need to be . I think when we’re able to captivate a place romatically we instantly draw forth the positive nature of what surrounds it, and lessens the impact of the negative,…never fully abated but stilled.
    One compelling difference I’ve found is that I am keenly aware of and curious about my ancestral roots, as my Mum garnished that fascination in me at a young age, but not all my friends’ understand it, as their used to only being of ‘one’ or ‘two’ countries {ie: England/Scot or French/Swiss}. I like to uncover the threads that stitch families together across centuries,…
    I am drinking up the words and history of this trilogy,…I cannot wait to soak into the words, as the narrative unfolds before me,… I like the delicate balance you laid out in being historically conscience with the flair of romantic sensibility and a good dashing of humour! Humour will always empower us to overcome adversity,…
    In closing, I simply adore the UK cover art for the simplicity and evocation of what may lie inside. Is the lucky commenter able to win the UK version?

  75. Hallo, Hallo dear Wenches!!
    Ms. Cornick – I simply love the synergy that fuses counter-culture interests, and the typewriter enthused souls are a heap of fun! One day I’ll share the lovely links, for now, if you want to see the film trailer for *Populaire* http://www.getthefive.com/articles/the-idealist/the-typewriter-renaissancewhats-old-is-cool-again/. I cannot wait for it to go on subtitled dvd! On my 2nd viewing, I nearly heard the English through the French! It’s quirky, fiesty, and ingenius!
    Ms. King: Although I try not to be up so very dear in the early morn, it happens time to time whenever I get jazzed about an interest I want to research,…sighs.
    Reading is such a visercal experience for me, and oft times is drenched in a personal wanton hope of experiencing a particular place and time that might not be achieved IRL. Scotland is heldfast to me, on ancestral grounds and the curiosity of someone who dips into the story-telling worlds of the Gaelic and Celtic. The Highlands have always called to me, so I would say it’s the setting that acts as a divining rod, yet it’s secured in the strength of the characters! The era by which the stories evolve is secondary, as I do like to transmorph between the different historical perspectives!
    Evenso, the Regency alongside the Victorian are the time dispersements I read more readily than others, save the French Revolution! I can say the Edwardian era might compete with the French, as there is something to be said for the inertia of a new century! Although, are their Scottish historical romances set then?
    Ms. Cornick: any story now that depicts Laird life is one that I will be keen to read, now that I know a bit about its history since I saw Monarch of the Glen.
    I know exactly what you mean,…when you fall in love with a particular place it etches its mirth into the niches of your heart whereupon your not only compelled to write a story set in that locale, but it’s a place you need to be . I think when we’re able to captivate a place romatically we instantly draw forth the positive nature of what surrounds it, and lessens the impact of the negative,…never fully abated but stilled.
    One compelling difference I’ve found is that I am keenly aware of and curious about my ancestral roots, as my Mum garnished that fascination in me at a young age, but not all my friends’ understand it, as their used to only being of ‘one’ or ‘two’ countries {ie: England/Scot or French/Swiss}. I like to uncover the threads that stitch families together across centuries,…
    I am drinking up the words and history of this trilogy,…I cannot wait to soak into the words, as the narrative unfolds before me,… I like the delicate balance you laid out in being historically conscience with the flair of romantic sensibility and a good dashing of humour! Humour will always empower us to overcome adversity,…
    In closing, I simply adore the UK cover art for the simplicity and evocation of what may lie inside. Is the lucky commenter able to win the UK version?

  76. Jorie, how lovely and poetic. The idea of uncovering the threads that stitch your own family together across the centuries and different lands is very powerful.
    The UK edition of the book isn’t available until September but if the winner wanted to wait for that version I would be very happy to supply it.

  77. Jorie, how lovely and poetic. The idea of uncovering the threads that stitch your own family together across the centuries and different lands is very powerful.
    The UK edition of the book isn’t available until September but if the winner wanted to wait for that version I would be very happy to supply it.

  78. Jorie, how lovely and poetic. The idea of uncovering the threads that stitch your own family together across the centuries and different lands is very powerful.
    The UK edition of the book isn’t available until September but if the winner wanted to wait for that version I would be very happy to supply it.

  79. Jorie, how lovely and poetic. The idea of uncovering the threads that stitch your own family together across the centuries and different lands is very powerful.
    The UK edition of the book isn’t available until September but if the winner wanted to wait for that version I would be very happy to supply it.

  80. Jorie, how lovely and poetic. The idea of uncovering the threads that stitch your own family together across the centuries and different lands is very powerful.
    The UK edition of the book isn’t available until September but if the winner wanted to wait for that version I would be very happy to supply it.

  81. What a lovely post! And I am so looking forward to reading this book. I love the rugged romance of Scotland. I spent a week there years ago and it really is a place the spurs the imagination. Standing on some of the crags and moors I was struck by the idea anything could happen and a romantic hero could ride out of the mists at any moment.

  82. What a lovely post! And I am so looking forward to reading this book. I love the rugged romance of Scotland. I spent a week there years ago and it really is a place the spurs the imagination. Standing on some of the crags and moors I was struck by the idea anything could happen and a romantic hero could ride out of the mists at any moment.

  83. What a lovely post! And I am so looking forward to reading this book. I love the rugged romance of Scotland. I spent a week there years ago and it really is a place the spurs the imagination. Standing on some of the crags and moors I was struck by the idea anything could happen and a romantic hero could ride out of the mists at any moment.

  84. What a lovely post! And I am so looking forward to reading this book. I love the rugged romance of Scotland. I spent a week there years ago and it really is a place the spurs the imagination. Standing on some of the crags and moors I was struck by the idea anything could happen and a romantic hero could ride out of the mists at any moment.

  85. What a lovely post! And I am so looking forward to reading this book. I love the rugged romance of Scotland. I spent a week there years ago and it really is a place the spurs the imagination. Standing on some of the crags and moors I was struck by the idea anything could happen and a romantic hero could ride out of the mists at any moment.

  86. Hi Nicola and Susan, when you write about the Scots-Irish being resistant to authority, it brought to mind the book by James Webb(the former U.S. Senator from Virginia) called “Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America”
    You can get a bit of an idea from a piece about it on his website: http://www.jameswebb.com/editorials_articles/parade-scotsirish.html
    There is still a strong strain of anti-authoritarianism in American culture, especially in Appalachia where most of the early Scots first settled.

  87. Hi Nicola and Susan, when you write about the Scots-Irish being resistant to authority, it brought to mind the book by James Webb(the former U.S. Senator from Virginia) called “Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America”
    You can get a bit of an idea from a piece about it on his website: http://www.jameswebb.com/editorials_articles/parade-scotsirish.html
    There is still a strong strain of anti-authoritarianism in American culture, especially in Appalachia where most of the early Scots first settled.

  88. Hi Nicola and Susan, when you write about the Scots-Irish being resistant to authority, it brought to mind the book by James Webb(the former U.S. Senator from Virginia) called “Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America”
    You can get a bit of an idea from a piece about it on his website: http://www.jameswebb.com/editorials_articles/parade-scotsirish.html
    There is still a strong strain of anti-authoritarianism in American culture, especially in Appalachia where most of the early Scots first settled.

  89. Hi Nicola and Susan, when you write about the Scots-Irish being resistant to authority, it brought to mind the book by James Webb(the former U.S. Senator from Virginia) called “Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America”
    You can get a bit of an idea from a piece about it on his website: http://www.jameswebb.com/editorials_articles/parade-scotsirish.html
    There is still a strong strain of anti-authoritarianism in American culture, especially in Appalachia where most of the early Scots first settled.

  90. Hi Nicola and Susan, when you write about the Scots-Irish being resistant to authority, it brought to mind the book by James Webb(the former U.S. Senator from Virginia) called “Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America”
    You can get a bit of an idea from a piece about it on his website: http://www.jameswebb.com/editorials_articles/parade-scotsirish.html
    There is still a strong strain of anti-authoritarianism in American culture, especially in Appalachia where most of the early Scots first settled.

  91. Jorie, you write so expressively – yes, I agree, some places do etch their way into your heart, and Scotland is one of those.
    Karin, I love the independent streak in the Scots as well as the Irish. Maybe it’s because I’ve got both Scots and Irish in me.
    Louisa, what a great way to capture the romantic feeling of being in Scotland!

  92. Jorie, you write so expressively – yes, I agree, some places do etch their way into your heart, and Scotland is one of those.
    Karin, I love the independent streak in the Scots as well as the Irish. Maybe it’s because I’ve got both Scots and Irish in me.
    Louisa, what a great way to capture the romantic feeling of being in Scotland!

  93. Jorie, you write so expressively – yes, I agree, some places do etch their way into your heart, and Scotland is one of those.
    Karin, I love the independent streak in the Scots as well as the Irish. Maybe it’s because I’ve got both Scots and Irish in me.
    Louisa, what a great way to capture the romantic feeling of being in Scotland!

  94. Jorie, you write so expressively – yes, I agree, some places do etch their way into your heart, and Scotland is one of those.
    Karin, I love the independent streak in the Scots as well as the Irish. Maybe it’s because I’ve got both Scots and Irish in me.
    Louisa, what a great way to capture the romantic feeling of being in Scotland!

  95. Jorie, you write so expressively – yes, I agree, some places do etch their way into your heart, and Scotland is one of those.
    Karin, I love the independent streak in the Scots as well as the Irish. Maybe it’s because I’ve got both Scots and Irish in me.
    Louisa, what a great way to capture the romantic feeling of being in Scotland!

  96. Lovely interview/chat Susan and Nicola. I’m a big fan of all kinds of Scottish stories, possibly because as a small child of Scottish forebears (with a strong romantic streak —raised on Burns, we even said the Selkirk Grace at mealtimes), we moved to Scotland for a year and I attended school there. I read so many marvellous stories of Scots adventure and history, and we explored various corners of Scotland at every opportunity.
    Looking forward to reading the new book, Nicola.

  97. Lovely interview/chat Susan and Nicola. I’m a big fan of all kinds of Scottish stories, possibly because as a small child of Scottish forebears (with a strong romantic streak —raised on Burns, we even said the Selkirk Grace at mealtimes), we moved to Scotland for a year and I attended school there. I read so many marvellous stories of Scots adventure and history, and we explored various corners of Scotland at every opportunity.
    Looking forward to reading the new book, Nicola.

  98. Lovely interview/chat Susan and Nicola. I’m a big fan of all kinds of Scottish stories, possibly because as a small child of Scottish forebears (with a strong romantic streak —raised on Burns, we even said the Selkirk Grace at mealtimes), we moved to Scotland for a year and I attended school there. I read so many marvellous stories of Scots adventure and history, and we explored various corners of Scotland at every opportunity.
    Looking forward to reading the new book, Nicola.

  99. Lovely interview/chat Susan and Nicola. I’m a big fan of all kinds of Scottish stories, possibly because as a small child of Scottish forebears (with a strong romantic streak —raised on Burns, we even said the Selkirk Grace at mealtimes), we moved to Scotland for a year and I attended school there. I read so many marvellous stories of Scots adventure and history, and we explored various corners of Scotland at every opportunity.
    Looking forward to reading the new book, Nicola.

  100. Lovely interview/chat Susan and Nicola. I’m a big fan of all kinds of Scottish stories, possibly because as a small child of Scottish forebears (with a strong romantic streak —raised on Burns, we even said the Selkirk Grace at mealtimes), we moved to Scotland for a year and I attended school there. I read so many marvellous stories of Scots adventure and history, and we explored various corners of Scotland at every opportunity.
    Looking forward to reading the new book, Nicola.

  101. It’s all of the above. 😀 I love the Regency and I love a Scottish hero, and Scottish settings are fantastic, no matter what the era.

  102. It’s all of the above. 😀 I love the Regency and I love a Scottish hero, and Scottish settings are fantastic, no matter what the era.

  103. It’s all of the above. 😀 I love the Regency and I love a Scottish hero, and Scottish settings are fantastic, no matter what the era.

  104. It’s all of the above. 😀 I love the Regency and I love a Scottish hero, and Scottish settings are fantastic, no matter what the era.

  105. It’s all of the above. 😀 I love the Regency and I love a Scottish hero, and Scottish settings are fantastic, no matter what the era.

  106. Thank you very much, Anne. It’s wonderful that you have such close connections to Scotland. I think that stays with you always; it’s in the blood somehow.
    Hi Ella! Thank you so much. Yes, it was such fun to chat with Susan on a topic close to both our hearts. It’s fascinating how many people have Scots connections and are justifiably proud of them too!

  107. Thank you very much, Anne. It’s wonderful that you have such close connections to Scotland. I think that stays with you always; it’s in the blood somehow.
    Hi Ella! Thank you so much. Yes, it was such fun to chat with Susan on a topic close to both our hearts. It’s fascinating how many people have Scots connections and are justifiably proud of them too!

  108. Thank you very much, Anne. It’s wonderful that you have such close connections to Scotland. I think that stays with you always; it’s in the blood somehow.
    Hi Ella! Thank you so much. Yes, it was such fun to chat with Susan on a topic close to both our hearts. It’s fascinating how many people have Scots connections and are justifiably proud of them too!

  109. Thank you very much, Anne. It’s wonderful that you have such close connections to Scotland. I think that stays with you always; it’s in the blood somehow.
    Hi Ella! Thank you so much. Yes, it was such fun to chat with Susan on a topic close to both our hearts. It’s fascinating how many people have Scots connections and are justifiably proud of them too!

  110. Thank you very much, Anne. It’s wonderful that you have such close connections to Scotland. I think that stays with you always; it’s in the blood somehow.
    Hi Ella! Thank you so much. Yes, it was such fun to chat with Susan on a topic close to both our hearts. It’s fascinating how many people have Scots connections and are justifiably proud of them too!

  111. If I win a copy, this will be the first Scottish Regency I have read. Then I will be able to answer the questions. Meanwhile I will look for this book at the library. Dee

  112. If I win a copy, this will be the first Scottish Regency I have read. Then I will be able to answer the questions. Meanwhile I will look for this book at the library. Dee

  113. If I win a copy, this will be the first Scottish Regency I have read. Then I will be able to answer the questions. Meanwhile I will look for this book at the library. Dee

  114. If I win a copy, this will be the first Scottish Regency I have read. Then I will be able to answer the questions. Meanwhile I will look for this book at the library. Dee

  115. If I win a copy, this will be the first Scottish Regency I have read. Then I will be able to answer the questions. Meanwhile I will look for this book at the library. Dee

  116. Ella – maybe your husband’s ancestors and mine knew each other! 😉
    It’s great that so many of us here are lovers of Scotland and things Scottish, including Scottish romance!

  117. Ella – maybe your husband’s ancestors and mine knew each other! 😉
    It’s great that so many of us here are lovers of Scotland and things Scottish, including Scottish romance!

  118. Ella – maybe your husband’s ancestors and mine knew each other! 😉
    It’s great that so many of us here are lovers of Scotland and things Scottish, including Scottish romance!

  119. Ella – maybe your husband’s ancestors and mine knew each other! 😉
    It’s great that so many of us here are lovers of Scotland and things Scottish, including Scottish romance!

  120. Ella – maybe your husband’s ancestors and mine knew each other! 😉
    It’s great that so many of us here are lovers of Scotland and things Scottish, including Scottish romance!

  121. Nicola,
    I have The Lady & The Laird on my “to read” shelf and I’m looking forward to it. Next year I’m making a research trip to the Western Highlands of Scotland to write a trilogy sometime in the future, so this is great!

  122. Nicola,
    I have The Lady & The Laird on my “to read” shelf and I’m looking forward to it. Next year I’m making a research trip to the Western Highlands of Scotland to write a trilogy sometime in the future, so this is great!

  123. Nicola,
    I have The Lady & The Laird on my “to read” shelf and I’m looking forward to it. Next year I’m making a research trip to the Western Highlands of Scotland to write a trilogy sometime in the future, so this is great!

  124. Nicola,
    I have The Lady & The Laird on my “to read” shelf and I’m looking forward to it. Next year I’m making a research trip to the Western Highlands of Scotland to write a trilogy sometime in the future, so this is great!

  125. Nicola,
    I have The Lady & The Laird on my “to read” shelf and I’m looking forward to it. Next year I’m making a research trip to the Western Highlands of Scotland to write a trilogy sometime in the future, so this is great!

  126. I love anything scottish – I do have a half scots husband but no tartan not even one invented in 1815 or later !As I discovered when himself wanted to wear a kilt for the daughters wedding.Since his father was born and raised in Caithness (you can’t get much further north without landing on an island )I decided that his parents must have been english servants having moved north with their employers – no I traced them up there until before 1745 ! The clearances didn’t seem to affect their little corner right by the Queen Mothers Castle Mey so I have now decided they must have arrived with the Vikings probably with horns on their heads.A Swedish friend then helpfully told me Banks is a fairly common name over there – case proved !
    On the regency front I don’t really mind where the story is set.My main requirements for a good regency is a believable plot a yummy hero and a heroine with plenty of spunk given all that the characters have to fit into their setting as I am sure Nicola’s do.

  127. I love anything scottish – I do have a half scots husband but no tartan not even one invented in 1815 or later !As I discovered when himself wanted to wear a kilt for the daughters wedding.Since his father was born and raised in Caithness (you can’t get much further north without landing on an island )I decided that his parents must have been english servants having moved north with their employers – no I traced them up there until before 1745 ! The clearances didn’t seem to affect their little corner right by the Queen Mothers Castle Mey so I have now decided they must have arrived with the Vikings probably with horns on their heads.A Swedish friend then helpfully told me Banks is a fairly common name over there – case proved !
    On the regency front I don’t really mind where the story is set.My main requirements for a good regency is a believable plot a yummy hero and a heroine with plenty of spunk given all that the characters have to fit into their setting as I am sure Nicola’s do.

  128. I love anything scottish – I do have a half scots husband but no tartan not even one invented in 1815 or later !As I discovered when himself wanted to wear a kilt for the daughters wedding.Since his father was born and raised in Caithness (you can’t get much further north without landing on an island )I decided that his parents must have been english servants having moved north with their employers – no I traced them up there until before 1745 ! The clearances didn’t seem to affect their little corner right by the Queen Mothers Castle Mey so I have now decided they must have arrived with the Vikings probably with horns on their heads.A Swedish friend then helpfully told me Banks is a fairly common name over there – case proved !
    On the regency front I don’t really mind where the story is set.My main requirements for a good regency is a believable plot a yummy hero and a heroine with plenty of spunk given all that the characters have to fit into their setting as I am sure Nicola’s do.

  129. I love anything scottish – I do have a half scots husband but no tartan not even one invented in 1815 or later !As I discovered when himself wanted to wear a kilt for the daughters wedding.Since his father was born and raised in Caithness (you can’t get much further north without landing on an island )I decided that his parents must have been english servants having moved north with their employers – no I traced them up there until before 1745 ! The clearances didn’t seem to affect their little corner right by the Queen Mothers Castle Mey so I have now decided they must have arrived with the Vikings probably with horns on their heads.A Swedish friend then helpfully told me Banks is a fairly common name over there – case proved !
    On the regency front I don’t really mind where the story is set.My main requirements for a good regency is a believable plot a yummy hero and a heroine with plenty of spunk given all that the characters have to fit into their setting as I am sure Nicola’s do.

  130. I love anything scottish – I do have a half scots husband but no tartan not even one invented in 1815 or later !As I discovered when himself wanted to wear a kilt for the daughters wedding.Since his father was born and raised in Caithness (you can’t get much further north without landing on an island )I decided that his parents must have been english servants having moved north with their employers – no I traced them up there until before 1745 ! The clearances didn’t seem to affect their little corner right by the Queen Mothers Castle Mey so I have now decided they must have arrived with the Vikings probably with horns on their heads.A Swedish friend then helpfully told me Banks is a fairly common name over there – case proved !
    On the regency front I don’t really mind where the story is set.My main requirements for a good regency is a believable plot a yummy hero and a heroine with plenty of spunk given all that the characters have to fit into their setting as I am sure Nicola’s do.

  131. I just love Scotland. I want to visit there before I die. My family are Irish. German, and NA. But I think there is Scot in there with the MacMahans. I have Irish I know from the Ryan’s, Hays, and I don’t know where the Trospers came from but I live it. I am now a little old girl in Alabama but I did my genealogy research. I know I am a great great great granddaughter of Daniel Boone and one grandpa came from Old Frankfurt Germany but its all mashed together in this little old country girl. My daughter went to Iteland for her graduation present from UA but I had to stay home. I love reading all these novels and I hope to someday write as you ladies do. You make my days with your tales of Scotland.
    I just love ya!
    Linda

  132. I just love Scotland. I want to visit there before I die. My family are Irish. German, and NA. But I think there is Scot in there with the MacMahans. I have Irish I know from the Ryan’s, Hays, and I don’t know where the Trospers came from but I live it. I am now a little old girl in Alabama but I did my genealogy research. I know I am a great great great granddaughter of Daniel Boone and one grandpa came from Old Frankfurt Germany but its all mashed together in this little old country girl. My daughter went to Iteland for her graduation present from UA but I had to stay home. I love reading all these novels and I hope to someday write as you ladies do. You make my days with your tales of Scotland.
    I just love ya!
    Linda

  133. I just love Scotland. I want to visit there before I die. My family are Irish. German, and NA. But I think there is Scot in there with the MacMahans. I have Irish I know from the Ryan’s, Hays, and I don’t know where the Trospers came from but I live it. I am now a little old girl in Alabama but I did my genealogy research. I know I am a great great great granddaughter of Daniel Boone and one grandpa came from Old Frankfurt Germany but its all mashed together in this little old country girl. My daughter went to Iteland for her graduation present from UA but I had to stay home. I love reading all these novels and I hope to someday write as you ladies do. You make my days with your tales of Scotland.
    I just love ya!
    Linda

  134. I just love Scotland. I want to visit there before I die. My family are Irish. German, and NA. But I think there is Scot in there with the MacMahans. I have Irish I know from the Ryan’s, Hays, and I don’t know where the Trospers came from but I live it. I am now a little old girl in Alabama but I did my genealogy research. I know I am a great great great granddaughter of Daniel Boone and one grandpa came from Old Frankfurt Germany but its all mashed together in this little old country girl. My daughter went to Iteland for her graduation present from UA but I had to stay home. I love reading all these novels and I hope to someday write as you ladies do. You make my days with your tales of Scotland.
    I just love ya!
    Linda

  135. I just love Scotland. I want to visit there before I die. My family are Irish. German, and NA. But I think there is Scot in there with the MacMahans. I have Irish I know from the Ryan’s, Hays, and I don’t know where the Trospers came from but I live it. I am now a little old girl in Alabama but I did my genealogy research. I know I am a great great great granddaughter of Daniel Boone and one grandpa came from Old Frankfurt Germany but its all mashed together in this little old country girl. My daughter went to Iteland for her graduation present from UA but I had to stay home. I love reading all these novels and I hope to someday write as you ladies do. You make my days with your tales of Scotland.
    I just love ya!
    Linda

  136. I think the attraction is the contrast between the more rugged outdoor setting of Scotland and the “civilized” Regency London – it’s fun when the two intermix.

  137. I think the attraction is the contrast between the more rugged outdoor setting of Scotland and the “civilized” Regency London – it’s fun when the two intermix.

  138. I think the attraction is the contrast between the more rugged outdoor setting of Scotland and the “civilized” Regency London – it’s fun when the two intermix.

  139. I think the attraction is the contrast between the more rugged outdoor setting of Scotland and the “civilized” Regency London – it’s fun when the two intermix.

  140. I think the attraction is the contrast between the more rugged outdoor setting of Scotland and the “civilized” Regency London – it’s fun when the two intermix.

  141. What a wonderful and informative interview! Thank you, Nicola and Susan.
    Do you know, I wracked my brain to remember Scottish Regencies that I’ve read and I can only remember Ashley’s MacKenzie series (more about the men than about Scotland) and Jaclyn Reding’s White Heather. Hmm… must correct! Your new book sound like an excellent place to start and I can’t wait to read it.
    And Nicola, I’m dying to have my DNA tested!

  142. What a wonderful and informative interview! Thank you, Nicola and Susan.
    Do you know, I wracked my brain to remember Scottish Regencies that I’ve read and I can only remember Ashley’s MacKenzie series (more about the men than about Scotland) and Jaclyn Reding’s White Heather. Hmm… must correct! Your new book sound like an excellent place to start and I can’t wait to read it.
    And Nicola, I’m dying to have my DNA tested!

  143. What a wonderful and informative interview! Thank you, Nicola and Susan.
    Do you know, I wracked my brain to remember Scottish Regencies that I’ve read and I can only remember Ashley’s MacKenzie series (more about the men than about Scotland) and Jaclyn Reding’s White Heather. Hmm… must correct! Your new book sound like an excellent place to start and I can’t wait to read it.
    And Nicola, I’m dying to have my DNA tested!

  144. What a wonderful and informative interview! Thank you, Nicola and Susan.
    Do you know, I wracked my brain to remember Scottish Regencies that I’ve read and I can only remember Ashley’s MacKenzie series (more about the men than about Scotland) and Jaclyn Reding’s White Heather. Hmm… must correct! Your new book sound like an excellent place to start and I can’t wait to read it.
    And Nicola, I’m dying to have my DNA tested!

  145. What a wonderful and informative interview! Thank you, Nicola and Susan.
    Do you know, I wracked my brain to remember Scottish Regencies that I’ve read and I can only remember Ashley’s MacKenzie series (more about the men than about Scotland) and Jaclyn Reding’s White Heather. Hmm… must correct! Your new book sound like an excellent place to start and I can’t wait to read it.
    And Nicola, I’m dying to have my DNA tested!

  146. Donna, I love Jaclyn Reding’s Scottish Regencies – White Heather was just one of a series. Great stories. There are lots of Scottish Regencies out there (I wrote a series of four as Sarah Gabriel), and there are many by Cathy Maxwell and others. And Nicola has two more coming out! 🙂
    Some read more as Regencies with a Scottish flair, while some read more as Scottish stories set during the Regency. Depending on the time and location, there can be pretty notable differences culturally, historically and in terms of social structure and attitude, etc. There’s something for nearly every reader’s cup of tea!

  147. Donna, I love Jaclyn Reding’s Scottish Regencies – White Heather was just one of a series. Great stories. There are lots of Scottish Regencies out there (I wrote a series of four as Sarah Gabriel), and there are many by Cathy Maxwell and others. And Nicola has two more coming out! 🙂
    Some read more as Regencies with a Scottish flair, while some read more as Scottish stories set during the Regency. Depending on the time and location, there can be pretty notable differences culturally, historically and in terms of social structure and attitude, etc. There’s something for nearly every reader’s cup of tea!

  148. Donna, I love Jaclyn Reding’s Scottish Regencies – White Heather was just one of a series. Great stories. There are lots of Scottish Regencies out there (I wrote a series of four as Sarah Gabriel), and there are many by Cathy Maxwell and others. And Nicola has two more coming out! 🙂
    Some read more as Regencies with a Scottish flair, while some read more as Scottish stories set during the Regency. Depending on the time and location, there can be pretty notable differences culturally, historically and in terms of social structure and attitude, etc. There’s something for nearly every reader’s cup of tea!

  149. Donna, I love Jaclyn Reding’s Scottish Regencies – White Heather was just one of a series. Great stories. There are lots of Scottish Regencies out there (I wrote a series of four as Sarah Gabriel), and there are many by Cathy Maxwell and others. And Nicola has two more coming out! 🙂
    Some read more as Regencies with a Scottish flair, while some read more as Scottish stories set during the Regency. Depending on the time and location, there can be pretty notable differences culturally, historically and in terms of social structure and attitude, etc. There’s something for nearly every reader’s cup of tea!

  150. Donna, I love Jaclyn Reding’s Scottish Regencies – White Heather was just one of a series. Great stories. There are lots of Scottish Regencies out there (I wrote a series of four as Sarah Gabriel), and there are many by Cathy Maxwell and others. And Nicola has two more coming out! 🙂
    Some read more as Regencies with a Scottish flair, while some read more as Scottish stories set during the Regency. Depending on the time and location, there can be pretty notable differences culturally, historically and in terms of social structure and attitude, etc. There’s something for nearly every reader’s cup of tea!

  151. Thanks for the recs, Susan and for the info about Reding’s series. Since I practice energy therapy, the two of yours that are at the top of my TBR pile are The Angel Knight and Lady Miracle.

  152. Thanks for the recs, Susan and for the info about Reding’s series. Since I practice energy therapy, the two of yours that are at the top of my TBR pile are The Angel Knight and Lady Miracle.

  153. Thanks for the recs, Susan and for the info about Reding’s series. Since I practice energy therapy, the two of yours that are at the top of my TBR pile are The Angel Knight and Lady Miracle.

  154. Thanks for the recs, Susan and for the info about Reding’s series. Since I practice energy therapy, the two of yours that are at the top of my TBR pile are The Angel Knight and Lady Miracle.

  155. Thanks for the recs, Susan and for the info about Reding’s series. Since I practice energy therapy, the two of yours that are at the top of my TBR pile are The Angel Knight and Lady Miracle.

  156. Hi Regan. Thank you so much. I hope you enjoy the book! How wonderful that you have that research trip to look forward to!
    Thanks for dropping in, Jo! Robert, the hero of The Lady and the Laird, is from the Northern Isles and has Viking ancestry as well as highlander blood so I think your case is definitely proved, Jo.

  157. Hi Regan. Thank you so much. I hope you enjoy the book! How wonderful that you have that research trip to look forward to!
    Thanks for dropping in, Jo! Robert, the hero of The Lady and the Laird, is from the Northern Isles and has Viking ancestry as well as highlander blood so I think your case is definitely proved, Jo.

  158. Hi Regan. Thank you so much. I hope you enjoy the book! How wonderful that you have that research trip to look forward to!
    Thanks for dropping in, Jo! Robert, the hero of The Lady and the Laird, is from the Northern Isles and has Viking ancestry as well as highlander blood so I think your case is definitely proved, Jo.

  159. Hi Regan. Thank you so much. I hope you enjoy the book! How wonderful that you have that research trip to look forward to!
    Thanks for dropping in, Jo! Robert, the hero of The Lady and the Laird, is from the Northern Isles and has Viking ancestry as well as highlander blood so I think your case is definitely proved, Jo.

  160. Hi Regan. Thank you so much. I hope you enjoy the book! How wonderful that you have that research trip to look forward to!
    Thanks for dropping in, Jo! Robert, the hero of The Lady and the Laird, is from the Northern Isles and has Viking ancestry as well as highlander blood so I think your case is definitely proved, Jo.

  161. Wow, Linda, was a fabulous ancestry you have! So many fascinating threads to follow. And thank you so much – we’re thrilled you love the books!
    Hi Diane! Yes, I think that’s absolutely right – the contrast of the “civilised” society of the south and the rugged wildness of the north. Actually you still get that sort of contrast in the UK these days (I’m from the North LOL!)

  162. Wow, Linda, was a fabulous ancestry you have! So many fascinating threads to follow. And thank you so much – we’re thrilled you love the books!
    Hi Diane! Yes, I think that’s absolutely right – the contrast of the “civilised” society of the south and the rugged wildness of the north. Actually you still get that sort of contrast in the UK these days (I’m from the North LOL!)

  163. Wow, Linda, was a fabulous ancestry you have! So many fascinating threads to follow. And thank you so much – we’re thrilled you love the books!
    Hi Diane! Yes, I think that’s absolutely right – the contrast of the “civilised” society of the south and the rugged wildness of the north. Actually you still get that sort of contrast in the UK these days (I’m from the North LOL!)

  164. Wow, Linda, was a fabulous ancestry you have! So many fascinating threads to follow. And thank you so much – we’re thrilled you love the books!
    Hi Diane! Yes, I think that’s absolutely right – the contrast of the “civilised” society of the south and the rugged wildness of the north. Actually you still get that sort of contrast in the UK these days (I’m from the North LOL!)

  165. Wow, Linda, was a fabulous ancestry you have! So many fascinating threads to follow. And thank you so much – we’re thrilled you love the books!
    Hi Diane! Yes, I think that’s absolutely right – the contrast of the “civilised” society of the south and the rugged wildness of the north. Actually you still get that sort of contrast in the UK these days (I’m from the North LOL!)

  166. Thanks, Donna! I hope my book gives you a taste for Scottish Regencies. Wouldn’t it be so fabulous to have your DNA tested? Though I do wonder how I would feel if I thought I was a Viking and I turned out not to be…

  167. Thanks, Donna! I hope my book gives you a taste for Scottish Regencies. Wouldn’t it be so fabulous to have your DNA tested? Though I do wonder how I would feel if I thought I was a Viking and I turned out not to be…

  168. Thanks, Donna! I hope my book gives you a taste for Scottish Regencies. Wouldn’t it be so fabulous to have your DNA tested? Though I do wonder how I would feel if I thought I was a Viking and I turned out not to be…

  169. Thanks, Donna! I hope my book gives you a taste for Scottish Regencies. Wouldn’t it be so fabulous to have your DNA tested? Though I do wonder how I would feel if I thought I was a Viking and I turned out not to be…

  170. Thanks, Donna! I hope my book gives you a taste for Scottish Regencies. Wouldn’t it be so fabulous to have your DNA tested? Though I do wonder how I would feel if I thought I was a Viking and I turned out not to be…

  171. I’ve always loved Regencies (cut my romance teeth on them), but Scotland (setting or hero) is always a first draw for me. Sigh!

  172. I’ve always loved Regencies (cut my romance teeth on them), but Scotland (setting or hero) is always a first draw for me. Sigh!

  173. I’ve always loved Regencies (cut my romance teeth on them), but Scotland (setting or hero) is always a first draw for me. Sigh!

  174. I’ve always loved Regencies (cut my romance teeth on them), but Scotland (setting or hero) is always a first draw for me. Sigh!

  175. I’ve always loved Regencies (cut my romance teeth on them), but Scotland (setting or hero) is always a first draw for me. Sigh!

  176. Hi Nicola and Susan-
    I am a huge fan of you both-Nicola, I have collected all but two of your books, and have them in order, ready to read! I’ve always wondered about the different versions (American vs UK)of novels-what do you change?
    And Susan, I’ve read all of your romance novels and am getting ready to read ‘Lady MacBeth’-thank you for hours of entertainment!
    I am impressed by each author’s ability to accurately research the time period-I have become Jeopardy champion in my house due to all of the wonderful facts I’ve learned reading historical romances! Thank you!

  177. Hi Nicola and Susan-
    I am a huge fan of you both-Nicola, I have collected all but two of your books, and have them in order, ready to read! I’ve always wondered about the different versions (American vs UK)of novels-what do you change?
    And Susan, I’ve read all of your romance novels and am getting ready to read ‘Lady MacBeth’-thank you for hours of entertainment!
    I am impressed by each author’s ability to accurately research the time period-I have become Jeopardy champion in my house due to all of the wonderful facts I’ve learned reading historical romances! Thank you!

  178. Hi Nicola and Susan-
    I am a huge fan of you both-Nicola, I have collected all but two of your books, and have them in order, ready to read! I’ve always wondered about the different versions (American vs UK)of novels-what do you change?
    And Susan, I’ve read all of your romance novels and am getting ready to read ‘Lady MacBeth’-thank you for hours of entertainment!
    I am impressed by each author’s ability to accurately research the time period-I have become Jeopardy champion in my house due to all of the wonderful facts I’ve learned reading historical romances! Thank you!

  179. Hi Nicola and Susan-
    I am a huge fan of you both-Nicola, I have collected all but two of your books, and have them in order, ready to read! I’ve always wondered about the different versions (American vs UK)of novels-what do you change?
    And Susan, I’ve read all of your romance novels and am getting ready to read ‘Lady MacBeth’-thank you for hours of entertainment!
    I am impressed by each author’s ability to accurately research the time period-I have become Jeopardy champion in my house due to all of the wonderful facts I’ve learned reading historical romances! Thank you!

  180. Hi Nicola and Susan-
    I am a huge fan of you both-Nicola, I have collected all but two of your books, and have them in order, ready to read! I’ve always wondered about the different versions (American vs UK)of novels-what do you change?
    And Susan, I’ve read all of your romance novels and am getting ready to read ‘Lady MacBeth’-thank you for hours of entertainment!
    I am impressed by each author’s ability to accurately research the time period-I have become Jeopardy champion in my house due to all of the wonderful facts I’ve learned reading historical romances! Thank you!

  181. Thank you so much, Shirley! How lovely of you! I think all the Wenches really enjoy their research and drawing on the historical background to contribute to the atmosphere of the story.
    To answer your question, there is no difference at all between my UK and US editions other than the covers and back cover copy. The books themselves are the same, and even the US spelling isn’t changed for the UK readers which leads to a few letters of complaint!

  182. Thank you so much, Shirley! How lovely of you! I think all the Wenches really enjoy their research and drawing on the historical background to contribute to the atmosphere of the story.
    To answer your question, there is no difference at all between my UK and US editions other than the covers and back cover copy. The books themselves are the same, and even the US spelling isn’t changed for the UK readers which leads to a few letters of complaint!

  183. Thank you so much, Shirley! How lovely of you! I think all the Wenches really enjoy their research and drawing on the historical background to contribute to the atmosphere of the story.
    To answer your question, there is no difference at all between my UK and US editions other than the covers and back cover copy. The books themselves are the same, and even the US spelling isn’t changed for the UK readers which leads to a few letters of complaint!

  184. Thank you so much, Shirley! How lovely of you! I think all the Wenches really enjoy their research and drawing on the historical background to contribute to the atmosphere of the story.
    To answer your question, there is no difference at all between my UK and US editions other than the covers and back cover copy. The books themselves are the same, and even the US spelling isn’t changed for the UK readers which leads to a few letters of complaint!

  185. Thank you so much, Shirley! How lovely of you! I think all the Wenches really enjoy their research and drawing on the historical background to contribute to the atmosphere of the story.
    To answer your question, there is no difference at all between my UK and US editions other than the covers and back cover copy. The books themselves are the same, and even the US spelling isn’t changed for the UK readers which leads to a few letters of complaint!

  186. Shirley, thank you! As Nicola said, we all love our research, and it’s great when a reader gives us good feedback on what we put our hearts and souls into.
    Jeopardy champion — LOL! Good point.
    Thanks for reading the books – I hope you enjoy Lady M! 🙂

  187. Shirley, thank you! As Nicola said, we all love our research, and it’s great when a reader gives us good feedback on what we put our hearts and souls into.
    Jeopardy champion — LOL! Good point.
    Thanks for reading the books – I hope you enjoy Lady M! 🙂

  188. Shirley, thank you! As Nicola said, we all love our research, and it’s great when a reader gives us good feedback on what we put our hearts and souls into.
    Jeopardy champion — LOL! Good point.
    Thanks for reading the books – I hope you enjoy Lady M! 🙂

  189. Shirley, thank you! As Nicola said, we all love our research, and it’s great when a reader gives us good feedback on what we put our hearts and souls into.
    Jeopardy champion — LOL! Good point.
    Thanks for reading the books – I hope you enjoy Lady M! 🙂

  190. Shirley, thank you! As Nicola said, we all love our research, and it’s great when a reader gives us good feedback on what we put our hearts and souls into.
    Jeopardy champion — LOL! Good point.
    Thanks for reading the books – I hope you enjoy Lady M! 🙂

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