A Christmas Carol Quiz

Anne here, and since it's almost Christmas, and it's 170 years since the first publication of Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol (1843), I thought it might be fun to do a little quiz about Dickens and the writing of this perennially popular story. A_Christmas_Carol-Title_page-First_edition_1843

To do this quiz you'll need a pen and paper to note your answers. Then click on the link at the end of the quiz and it will take you to the answer page. Check your scores and come back and tell us how you went.
Have fun!  

1) Dickens originally wrote A Christmas Carol:—
        a) because his wife was pregnant and he needed the money        
        b) for a bet         
        c) because his vicar asked him to write a morality tale         
        d) to entertain his children

2) How long did Dickens take to write A Christmas Carol?  
       a) seven months         
        b) nine months        
        c) six weeks        
         d) three years  

3) The story was originally published:—        
        a)  in a green baize cover         
        b)  in serial form in a magazine         
        c)  in a handsomely bound red leather volume         
        d)  in a series of cheaply bound paper booklets  

4) When A Christmas Carol was published:—         
        a) Dickens gave a tenth of the profits to charity                
        b) Dickens published it at his own expense         
        c) the publisher paid Dickens a lump sum of £100         
        d) Dickens made no money at all from it.  

5) The book was a huge artistic success but:         
        a) most critics hated it         
        b) it didn't sell very many copies         
        c) Dickens was very unhappy with it.         
        d) it wasn't a financial success  

6)  When Dickens' was twelve, his father was imprisoned for:-         
        a) fraud         
        b) debt        
        c) embezzlement         
        d) plagiarism  

7) The tale was influenced by Dickens's own life. As a boy he was forced to work:—         
        a) in a shoe blacking factory         
        b) in a book binding shop         
        c) in a goose-plucking establishment         
        d) in a carriage-making factory  

8) His fellow workers referred to the 12 year old Dickens as:         
        a) "his nibs"       
        b) "the young scribbler"         
        c) "the young gentleman"         
        d) "the little prince"    

9) In an early draft of the manuscript, Tiny Tim was called:         
        a) Tiny Tom         
        b) Little Johnny         
        c) Limping Leo         
        d) Little Fred  

10) The original manuscript gave no hint of the fate of Tiny Tim but at the last minute Dickens inserted a sentence that indicated Tiny Tim did not die and that Scrooge became a second father to him. The reason Dickens did this is:—         
        a) because Dickens's wife asked him to let the boy to live         
        b) not known         
        c) because Dickens's publisher asked him to let the boy to live         
        d) because hundreds of people wrote and begged him to let the boy live  

Hope you found this little quiz fun.
Click here to get the answers — and don't forget to come back and tell us how you went.

Happy Christmas, from Anne

 

210 thoughts on “A Christmas Carol Quiz”

  1. That was fun, Anne! I got five right, which was amazing considering how little I know about Dickens. What the Dickens??? LOL.
    Thanks for a fun quiz (and a bit of education along the way).

    Reply
  2. That was fun, Anne! I got five right, which was amazing considering how little I know about Dickens. What the Dickens??? LOL.
    Thanks for a fun quiz (and a bit of education along the way).

    Reply
  3. That was fun, Anne! I got five right, which was amazing considering how little I know about Dickens. What the Dickens??? LOL.
    Thanks for a fun quiz (and a bit of education along the way).

    Reply
  4. That was fun, Anne! I got five right, which was amazing considering how little I know about Dickens. What the Dickens??? LOL.
    Thanks for a fun quiz (and a bit of education along the way).

    Reply
  5. That was fun, Anne! I got five right, which was amazing considering how little I know about Dickens. What the Dickens??? LOL.
    Thanks for a fun quiz (and a bit of education along the way).

    Reply
  6. Lol, Trish, what the Dickens is right! And five right is pretty darned good. I have to admit I get a bit sneaky making up the alternative answers — I actually really enjoy that part.
    Thanks for dropping by and having a go.

    Reply
  7. Lol, Trish, what the Dickens is right! And five right is pretty darned good. I have to admit I get a bit sneaky making up the alternative answers — I actually really enjoy that part.
    Thanks for dropping by and having a go.

    Reply
  8. Lol, Trish, what the Dickens is right! And five right is pretty darned good. I have to admit I get a bit sneaky making up the alternative answers — I actually really enjoy that part.
    Thanks for dropping by and having a go.

    Reply
  9. Lol, Trish, what the Dickens is right! And five right is pretty darned good. I have to admit I get a bit sneaky making up the alternative answers — I actually really enjoy that part.
    Thanks for dropping by and having a go.

    Reply
  10. Lol, Trish, what the Dickens is right! And five right is pretty darned good. I have to admit I get a bit sneaky making up the alternative answers — I actually really enjoy that part.
    Thanks for dropping by and having a go.

    Reply
  11. While I’m here Ms Gracie, I would love to know where that “What the Dickens?” phrase came from. I figure it’s got something to do with Dickens and as this is a blog about Dickens – do you happen to know?
    🙂
    Best to you
    Trishx

    Reply
  12. While I’m here Ms Gracie, I would love to know where that “What the Dickens?” phrase came from. I figure it’s got something to do with Dickens and as this is a blog about Dickens – do you happen to know?
    🙂
    Best to you
    Trishx

    Reply
  13. While I’m here Ms Gracie, I would love to know where that “What the Dickens?” phrase came from. I figure it’s got something to do with Dickens and as this is a blog about Dickens – do you happen to know?
    🙂
    Best to you
    Trishx

    Reply
  14. While I’m here Ms Gracie, I would love to know where that “What the Dickens?” phrase came from. I figure it’s got something to do with Dickens and as this is a blog about Dickens – do you happen to know?
    🙂
    Best to you
    Trishx

    Reply
  15. While I’m here Ms Gracie, I would love to know where that “What the Dickens?” phrase came from. I figure it’s got something to do with Dickens and as this is a blog about Dickens – do you happen to know?
    🙂
    Best to you
    Trishx

    Reply
  16. Trish, I had to look it up, but it’s not anything to do with Charles Dickens. It’s a euphemism for “devil”.
    Shakespeare coined the phrase, using it in his play The Merry Wives of Windsor — “I cannot tell what the dickens his name is” (Act III, Scene II)
    People also use the phrases “run like the dickens” and “he’s a right little dickens” — both of which are obviously also using ‘dickens’ instead of ‘devil.’
    Thanks for pushing me to find out.

    Reply
  17. Trish, I had to look it up, but it’s not anything to do with Charles Dickens. It’s a euphemism for “devil”.
    Shakespeare coined the phrase, using it in his play The Merry Wives of Windsor — “I cannot tell what the dickens his name is” (Act III, Scene II)
    People also use the phrases “run like the dickens” and “he’s a right little dickens” — both of which are obviously also using ‘dickens’ instead of ‘devil.’
    Thanks for pushing me to find out.

    Reply
  18. Trish, I had to look it up, but it’s not anything to do with Charles Dickens. It’s a euphemism for “devil”.
    Shakespeare coined the phrase, using it in his play The Merry Wives of Windsor — “I cannot tell what the dickens his name is” (Act III, Scene II)
    People also use the phrases “run like the dickens” and “he’s a right little dickens” — both of which are obviously also using ‘dickens’ instead of ‘devil.’
    Thanks for pushing me to find out.

    Reply
  19. Trish, I had to look it up, but it’s not anything to do with Charles Dickens. It’s a euphemism for “devil”.
    Shakespeare coined the phrase, using it in his play The Merry Wives of Windsor — “I cannot tell what the dickens his name is” (Act III, Scene II)
    People also use the phrases “run like the dickens” and “he’s a right little dickens” — both of which are obviously also using ‘dickens’ instead of ‘devil.’
    Thanks for pushing me to find out.

    Reply
  20. Trish, I had to look it up, but it’s not anything to do with Charles Dickens. It’s a euphemism for “devil”.
    Shakespeare coined the phrase, using it in his play The Merry Wives of Windsor — “I cannot tell what the dickens his name is” (Act III, Scene II)
    People also use the phrases “run like the dickens” and “he’s a right little dickens” — both of which are obviously also using ‘dickens’ instead of ‘devil.’
    Thanks for pushing me to find out.

    Reply
  21. Morning, Anne!
    I got nine of ten right, only because I just read the background on it because I listen to the Audible version of it every year. I missed #8, what they called him when he was young.
    I do love this story and I watch all of the versions except the Michael Finney one (just can’t watch it…) and I think my two favorites are the one with Alastair Sim and the Muppet Christmas Carol! 🙂
    Thanks for the fun quiz!

    Reply
  22. Morning, Anne!
    I got nine of ten right, only because I just read the background on it because I listen to the Audible version of it every year. I missed #8, what they called him when he was young.
    I do love this story and I watch all of the versions except the Michael Finney one (just can’t watch it…) and I think my two favorites are the one with Alastair Sim and the Muppet Christmas Carol! 🙂
    Thanks for the fun quiz!

    Reply
  23. Morning, Anne!
    I got nine of ten right, only because I just read the background on it because I listen to the Audible version of it every year. I missed #8, what they called him when he was young.
    I do love this story and I watch all of the versions except the Michael Finney one (just can’t watch it…) and I think my two favorites are the one with Alastair Sim and the Muppet Christmas Carol! 🙂
    Thanks for the fun quiz!

    Reply
  24. Morning, Anne!
    I got nine of ten right, only because I just read the background on it because I listen to the Audible version of it every year. I missed #8, what they called him when he was young.
    I do love this story and I watch all of the versions except the Michael Finney one (just can’t watch it…) and I think my two favorites are the one with Alastair Sim and the Muppet Christmas Carol! 🙂
    Thanks for the fun quiz!

    Reply
  25. Morning, Anne!
    I got nine of ten right, only because I just read the background on it because I listen to the Audible version of it every year. I missed #8, what they called him when he was young.
    I do love this story and I watch all of the versions except the Michael Finney one (just can’t watch it…) and I think my two favorites are the one with Alastair Sim and the Muppet Christmas Carol! 🙂
    Thanks for the fun quiz!

    Reply
  26. Well done, Theo! Yes, the background is fascinating, isn’t it. And I haven’t seen the muppet version, but I love the old Alastair Sim version best, too.
    It’s a great story, deserving of its longevity. I used to read a simplified version of it with my adult literacy students every year, and they were always blown away that the story had been written so many years ago and was still relevant today. It also amazed them how they could already know so much about the story when they’d never even heard of the man or the book — it has become so much part of the fabric of modern culture.
    I’m glad you enjoyed the quiz. Happy Christmas.

    Reply
  27. Well done, Theo! Yes, the background is fascinating, isn’t it. And I haven’t seen the muppet version, but I love the old Alastair Sim version best, too.
    It’s a great story, deserving of its longevity. I used to read a simplified version of it with my adult literacy students every year, and they were always blown away that the story had been written so many years ago and was still relevant today. It also amazed them how they could already know so much about the story when they’d never even heard of the man or the book — it has become so much part of the fabric of modern culture.
    I’m glad you enjoyed the quiz. Happy Christmas.

    Reply
  28. Well done, Theo! Yes, the background is fascinating, isn’t it. And I haven’t seen the muppet version, but I love the old Alastair Sim version best, too.
    It’s a great story, deserving of its longevity. I used to read a simplified version of it with my adult literacy students every year, and they were always blown away that the story had been written so many years ago and was still relevant today. It also amazed them how they could already know so much about the story when they’d never even heard of the man or the book — it has become so much part of the fabric of modern culture.
    I’m glad you enjoyed the quiz. Happy Christmas.

    Reply
  29. Well done, Theo! Yes, the background is fascinating, isn’t it. And I haven’t seen the muppet version, but I love the old Alastair Sim version best, too.
    It’s a great story, deserving of its longevity. I used to read a simplified version of it with my adult literacy students every year, and they were always blown away that the story had been written so many years ago and was still relevant today. It also amazed them how they could already know so much about the story when they’d never even heard of the man or the book — it has become so much part of the fabric of modern culture.
    I’m glad you enjoyed the quiz. Happy Christmas.

    Reply
  30. Well done, Theo! Yes, the background is fascinating, isn’t it. And I haven’t seen the muppet version, but I love the old Alastair Sim version best, too.
    It’s a great story, deserving of its longevity. I used to read a simplified version of it with my adult literacy students every year, and they were always blown away that the story had been written so many years ago and was still relevant today. It also amazed them how they could already know so much about the story when they’d never even heard of the man or the book — it has become so much part of the fabric of modern culture.
    I’m glad you enjoyed the quiz. Happy Christmas.

    Reply
  31. I got 9 of the questions right, but it’s due to serendipity. I’m in a reading group at my local library and we just read “A Christmas Carol” and “The Man Who Invented Christmas” by Les Standiford, so the information was fresh in my mind. Like theo, I didn’t know what Dickens was called when young because that wasn’t part of the Christmas Carol story. Of course, ask me again this time next year, and I probably will get a significantly lower score.

    Reply
  32. I got 9 of the questions right, but it’s due to serendipity. I’m in a reading group at my local library and we just read “A Christmas Carol” and “The Man Who Invented Christmas” by Les Standiford, so the information was fresh in my mind. Like theo, I didn’t know what Dickens was called when young because that wasn’t part of the Christmas Carol story. Of course, ask me again this time next year, and I probably will get a significantly lower score.

    Reply
  33. I got 9 of the questions right, but it’s due to serendipity. I’m in a reading group at my local library and we just read “A Christmas Carol” and “The Man Who Invented Christmas” by Les Standiford, so the information was fresh in my mind. Like theo, I didn’t know what Dickens was called when young because that wasn’t part of the Christmas Carol story. Of course, ask me again this time next year, and I probably will get a significantly lower score.

    Reply
  34. I got 9 of the questions right, but it’s due to serendipity. I’m in a reading group at my local library and we just read “A Christmas Carol” and “The Man Who Invented Christmas” by Les Standiford, so the information was fresh in my mind. Like theo, I didn’t know what Dickens was called when young because that wasn’t part of the Christmas Carol story. Of course, ask me again this time next year, and I probably will get a significantly lower score.

    Reply
  35. I got 9 of the questions right, but it’s due to serendipity. I’m in a reading group at my local library and we just read “A Christmas Carol” and “The Man Who Invented Christmas” by Les Standiford, so the information was fresh in my mind. Like theo, I didn’t know what Dickens was called when young because that wasn’t part of the Christmas Carol story. Of course, ask me again this time next year, and I probably will get a significantly lower score.

    Reply
  36. Well done, Susan! Nine is fantastic. I’d be interested to see what people picked for that Dickens’s fellow workers called him — a few people missed that one.
    I haven’t read the Standiford book — sounds interesting. From all I read, in the Victorian era there was a general resurgence of nostalgia, perhaps fuelled by the speed of industrial change and the rapid urbanization of England, as well as the growing gulf between rich and poor. So Dicken’s story, when it came out, really hit the spot with a wide range of people.

    Reply
  37. Well done, Susan! Nine is fantastic. I’d be interested to see what people picked for that Dickens’s fellow workers called him — a few people missed that one.
    I haven’t read the Standiford book — sounds interesting. From all I read, in the Victorian era there was a general resurgence of nostalgia, perhaps fuelled by the speed of industrial change and the rapid urbanization of England, as well as the growing gulf between rich and poor. So Dicken’s story, when it came out, really hit the spot with a wide range of people.

    Reply
  38. Well done, Susan! Nine is fantastic. I’d be interested to see what people picked for that Dickens’s fellow workers called him — a few people missed that one.
    I haven’t read the Standiford book — sounds interesting. From all I read, in the Victorian era there was a general resurgence of nostalgia, perhaps fuelled by the speed of industrial change and the rapid urbanization of England, as well as the growing gulf between rich and poor. So Dicken’s story, when it came out, really hit the spot with a wide range of people.

    Reply
  39. Well done, Susan! Nine is fantastic. I’d be interested to see what people picked for that Dickens’s fellow workers called him — a few people missed that one.
    I haven’t read the Standiford book — sounds interesting. From all I read, in the Victorian era there was a general resurgence of nostalgia, perhaps fuelled by the speed of industrial change and the rapid urbanization of England, as well as the growing gulf between rich and poor. So Dicken’s story, when it came out, really hit the spot with a wide range of people.

    Reply
  40. Well done, Susan! Nine is fantastic. I’d be interested to see what people picked for that Dickens’s fellow workers called him — a few people missed that one.
    I haven’t read the Standiford book — sounds interesting. From all I read, in the Victorian era there was a general resurgence of nostalgia, perhaps fuelled by the speed of industrial change and the rapid urbanization of England, as well as the growing gulf between rich and poor. So Dicken’s story, when it came out, really hit the spot with a wide range of people.

    Reply
  41. Felicity, don’t be embarrassed — six is a *very* respectable score. Most of those questions weren’t about the text, but about small and obscure details to do with Dickens’s life and the publication of the book itself. There was information there that was new to me, too — some only recently discovered –but I included it because I figured wenchly readers enjoy picking up little nuggets of obscure information
    If I hadn’t made the quiz up myself, I wouldn’t have got all the answers, either. 🙂
    The next quiz I’ll do will be on Regency slang and it won’t be nearly as tough, I promise. I was going to put that one up today, but then I read the Dicken’s article I linked to in a comment above, and it seemed so timely, I was inspired. Seems I’ve tortured everyone instead. LOL

    Reply
  42. Felicity, don’t be embarrassed — six is a *very* respectable score. Most of those questions weren’t about the text, but about small and obscure details to do with Dickens’s life and the publication of the book itself. There was information there that was new to me, too — some only recently discovered –but I included it because I figured wenchly readers enjoy picking up little nuggets of obscure information
    If I hadn’t made the quiz up myself, I wouldn’t have got all the answers, either. 🙂
    The next quiz I’ll do will be on Regency slang and it won’t be nearly as tough, I promise. I was going to put that one up today, but then I read the Dicken’s article I linked to in a comment above, and it seemed so timely, I was inspired. Seems I’ve tortured everyone instead. LOL

    Reply
  43. Felicity, don’t be embarrassed — six is a *very* respectable score. Most of those questions weren’t about the text, but about small and obscure details to do with Dickens’s life and the publication of the book itself. There was information there that was new to me, too — some only recently discovered –but I included it because I figured wenchly readers enjoy picking up little nuggets of obscure information
    If I hadn’t made the quiz up myself, I wouldn’t have got all the answers, either. 🙂
    The next quiz I’ll do will be on Regency slang and it won’t be nearly as tough, I promise. I was going to put that one up today, but then I read the Dicken’s article I linked to in a comment above, and it seemed so timely, I was inspired. Seems I’ve tortured everyone instead. LOL

    Reply
  44. Felicity, don’t be embarrassed — six is a *very* respectable score. Most of those questions weren’t about the text, but about small and obscure details to do with Dickens’s life and the publication of the book itself. There was information there that was new to me, too — some only recently discovered –but I included it because I figured wenchly readers enjoy picking up little nuggets of obscure information
    If I hadn’t made the quiz up myself, I wouldn’t have got all the answers, either. 🙂
    The next quiz I’ll do will be on Regency slang and it won’t be nearly as tough, I promise. I was going to put that one up today, but then I read the Dicken’s article I linked to in a comment above, and it seemed so timely, I was inspired. Seems I’ve tortured everyone instead. LOL

    Reply
  45. Felicity, don’t be embarrassed — six is a *very* respectable score. Most of those questions weren’t about the text, but about small and obscure details to do with Dickens’s life and the publication of the book itself. There was information there that was new to me, too — some only recently discovered –but I included it because I figured wenchly readers enjoy picking up little nuggets of obscure information
    If I hadn’t made the quiz up myself, I wouldn’t have got all the answers, either. 🙂
    The next quiz I’ll do will be on Regency slang and it won’t be nearly as tough, I promise. I was going to put that one up today, but then I read the Dicken’s article I linked to in a comment above, and it seemed so timely, I was inspired. Seems I’ve tortured everyone instead. LOL

    Reply
  46. I only had 4 right – I have been watching the movies based on the book. Last night I saw the first “talking” movie called “Scrooge”. I still enjoy the movie.

    Reply
  47. I only had 4 right – I have been watching the movies based on the book. Last night I saw the first “talking” movie called “Scrooge”. I still enjoy the movie.

    Reply
  48. I only had 4 right – I have been watching the movies based on the book. Last night I saw the first “talking” movie called “Scrooge”. I still enjoy the movie.

    Reply
  49. I only had 4 right – I have been watching the movies based on the book. Last night I saw the first “talking” movie called “Scrooge”. I still enjoy the movie.

    Reply
  50. I only had 4 right – I have been watching the movies based on the book. Last night I saw the first “talking” movie called “Scrooge”. I still enjoy the movie.

    Reply
  51. Four is fine, Bety — most of the questions weren’t about the story anyway. I bet if they had been you would have scored 10 out of 10. So thanks for having a go.
    It’s a testament to the greatness of the story that it’s lasted so long and been retold in so many formats, isn’t it?

    Reply
  52. Four is fine, Bety — most of the questions weren’t about the story anyway. I bet if they had been you would have scored 10 out of 10. So thanks for having a go.
    It’s a testament to the greatness of the story that it’s lasted so long and been retold in so many formats, isn’t it?

    Reply
  53. Four is fine, Bety — most of the questions weren’t about the story anyway. I bet if they had been you would have scored 10 out of 10. So thanks for having a go.
    It’s a testament to the greatness of the story that it’s lasted so long and been retold in so many formats, isn’t it?

    Reply
  54. Four is fine, Bety — most of the questions weren’t about the story anyway. I bet if they had been you would have scored 10 out of 10. So thanks for having a go.
    It’s a testament to the greatness of the story that it’s lasted so long and been retold in so many formats, isn’t it?

    Reply
  55. Four is fine, Bety — most of the questions weren’t about the story anyway. I bet if they had been you would have scored 10 out of 10. So thanks for having a go.
    It’s a testament to the greatness of the story that it’s lasted so long and been retold in so many formats, isn’t it?

    Reply
  56. I got 4 right Anne, which was a bit of luck. I’m afraid I don’t know a lot about Dickens, but I learnt quite a lot with this quiz. Thanks for puting it up. Merry Christmas Anne

    Reply
  57. I got 4 right Anne, which was a bit of luck. I’m afraid I don’t know a lot about Dickens, but I learnt quite a lot with this quiz. Thanks for puting it up. Merry Christmas Anne

    Reply
  58. I got 4 right Anne, which was a bit of luck. I’m afraid I don’t know a lot about Dickens, but I learnt quite a lot with this quiz. Thanks for puting it up. Merry Christmas Anne

    Reply
  59. I got 4 right Anne, which was a bit of luck. I’m afraid I don’t know a lot about Dickens, but I learnt quite a lot with this quiz. Thanks for puting it up. Merry Christmas Anne

    Reply
  60. I got 4 right Anne, which was a bit of luck. I’m afraid I don’t know a lot about Dickens, but I learnt quite a lot with this quiz. Thanks for puting it up. Merry Christmas Anne

    Reply
  61. Fun quiz 🙂 I got 6 out of 10 right, which is much more than I thought I knew.
    A Christmas Carol, both the book and all the movies and such made from it, is just about my favorite story. I had the pleasure of seeing Sir Patrick Stewart perform it as a one man show at Cal Tech some years ago, and that’s my favorite version because it plays only in my memory.

    Reply
  62. Fun quiz 🙂 I got 6 out of 10 right, which is much more than I thought I knew.
    A Christmas Carol, both the book and all the movies and such made from it, is just about my favorite story. I had the pleasure of seeing Sir Patrick Stewart perform it as a one man show at Cal Tech some years ago, and that’s my favorite version because it plays only in my memory.

    Reply
  63. Fun quiz 🙂 I got 6 out of 10 right, which is much more than I thought I knew.
    A Christmas Carol, both the book and all the movies and such made from it, is just about my favorite story. I had the pleasure of seeing Sir Patrick Stewart perform it as a one man show at Cal Tech some years ago, and that’s my favorite version because it plays only in my memory.

    Reply
  64. Fun quiz 🙂 I got 6 out of 10 right, which is much more than I thought I knew.
    A Christmas Carol, both the book and all the movies and such made from it, is just about my favorite story. I had the pleasure of seeing Sir Patrick Stewart perform it as a one man show at Cal Tech some years ago, and that’s my favorite version because it plays only in my memory.

    Reply
  65. Fun quiz 🙂 I got 6 out of 10 right, which is much more than I thought I knew.
    A Christmas Carol, both the book and all the movies and such made from it, is just about my favorite story. I had the pleasure of seeing Sir Patrick Stewart perform it as a one man show at Cal Tech some years ago, and that’s my favorite version because it plays only in my memory.

    Reply
  66. Oh, wow, Janice — that would have been something to see, I’m sure. Patrick Stewart is such a wonderful actor. I remember thinking he was wonderful years ago, when he was the evil Sejanus (sp?) in I Claudius.
    It’s all that training on the stage, doing Shakespeare — people forget that about so many of the British actors. And there’s something magical about live acting. When I was a schoolgirl we had some members of the Royal Shakespeare Society perform at our high school and I’ll never forget a hilarious recitation of I can’t get no satisfaction. And only a few minutes later a poem that had us almost in tears. Magic created with just the human voice.

    Reply
  67. Oh, wow, Janice — that would have been something to see, I’m sure. Patrick Stewart is such a wonderful actor. I remember thinking he was wonderful years ago, when he was the evil Sejanus (sp?) in I Claudius.
    It’s all that training on the stage, doing Shakespeare — people forget that about so many of the British actors. And there’s something magical about live acting. When I was a schoolgirl we had some members of the Royal Shakespeare Society perform at our high school and I’ll never forget a hilarious recitation of I can’t get no satisfaction. And only a few minutes later a poem that had us almost in tears. Magic created with just the human voice.

    Reply
  68. Oh, wow, Janice — that would have been something to see, I’m sure. Patrick Stewart is such a wonderful actor. I remember thinking he was wonderful years ago, when he was the evil Sejanus (sp?) in I Claudius.
    It’s all that training on the stage, doing Shakespeare — people forget that about so many of the British actors. And there’s something magical about live acting. When I was a schoolgirl we had some members of the Royal Shakespeare Society perform at our high school and I’ll never forget a hilarious recitation of I can’t get no satisfaction. And only a few minutes later a poem that had us almost in tears. Magic created with just the human voice.

    Reply
  69. Oh, wow, Janice — that would have been something to see, I’m sure. Patrick Stewart is such a wonderful actor. I remember thinking he was wonderful years ago, when he was the evil Sejanus (sp?) in I Claudius.
    It’s all that training on the stage, doing Shakespeare — people forget that about so many of the British actors. And there’s something magical about live acting. When I was a schoolgirl we had some members of the Royal Shakespeare Society perform at our high school and I’ll never forget a hilarious recitation of I can’t get no satisfaction. And only a few minutes later a poem that had us almost in tears. Magic created with just the human voice.

    Reply
  70. Oh, wow, Janice — that would have been something to see, I’m sure. Patrick Stewart is such a wonderful actor. I remember thinking he was wonderful years ago, when he was the evil Sejanus (sp?) in I Claudius.
    It’s all that training on the stage, doing Shakespeare — people forget that about so many of the British actors. And there’s something magical about live acting. When I was a schoolgirl we had some members of the Royal Shakespeare Society perform at our high school and I’ll never forget a hilarious recitation of I can’t get no satisfaction. And only a few minutes later a poem that had us almost in tears. Magic created with just the human voice.

    Reply
  71. Thanks for a great quiz. I got 6 correct.
    When I read your explanation on the origin of, “What the Dickens”, I was reminded how often I am amazed at how many of our everyday expressions come from Shakespeare.

    Reply
  72. Thanks for a great quiz. I got 6 correct.
    When I read your explanation on the origin of, “What the Dickens”, I was reminded how often I am amazed at how many of our everyday expressions come from Shakespeare.

    Reply
  73. Thanks for a great quiz. I got 6 correct.
    When I read your explanation on the origin of, “What the Dickens”, I was reminded how often I am amazed at how many of our everyday expressions come from Shakespeare.

    Reply
  74. Thanks for a great quiz. I got 6 correct.
    When I read your explanation on the origin of, “What the Dickens”, I was reminded how often I am amazed at how many of our everyday expressions come from Shakespeare.

    Reply
  75. Thanks for a great quiz. I got 6 correct.
    When I read your explanation on the origin of, “What the Dickens”, I was reminded how often I am amazed at how many of our everyday expressions come from Shakespeare.

    Reply
  76. I got 5 right….I really did believe he let Tiny Tim live because of popular demand from the public. Now I’m going to be looking for reruns of The Christmas Carol on my cable TV stations.

    Reply
  77. I got 5 right….I really did believe he let Tiny Tim live because of popular demand from the public. Now I’m going to be looking for reruns of The Christmas Carol on my cable TV stations.

    Reply
  78. I got 5 right….I really did believe he let Tiny Tim live because of popular demand from the public. Now I’m going to be looking for reruns of The Christmas Carol on my cable TV stations.

    Reply
  79. I got 5 right….I really did believe he let Tiny Tim live because of popular demand from the public. Now I’m going to be looking for reruns of The Christmas Carol on my cable TV stations.

    Reply
  80. I got 5 right….I really did believe he let Tiny Tim live because of popular demand from the public. Now I’m going to be looking for reruns of The Christmas Carol on my cable TV stations.

    Reply
  81. I got 5, but only because they were mentioned in another article I read last week. I’m surprised I remembered that many though. 🙂
    Fun quiz. I’ll be checking out the other ones later. Thanks!
    Merry Christmas!!

    Reply
  82. I got 5, but only because they were mentioned in another article I read last week. I’m surprised I remembered that many though. 🙂
    Fun quiz. I’ll be checking out the other ones later. Thanks!
    Merry Christmas!!

    Reply
  83. I got 5, but only because they were mentioned in another article I read last week. I’m surprised I remembered that many though. 🙂
    Fun quiz. I’ll be checking out the other ones later. Thanks!
    Merry Christmas!!

    Reply
  84. I got 5, but only because they were mentioned in another article I read last week. I’m surprised I remembered that many though. 🙂
    Fun quiz. I’ll be checking out the other ones later. Thanks!
    Merry Christmas!!

    Reply
  85. I got 5, but only because they were mentioned in another article I read last week. I’m surprised I remembered that many though. 🙂
    Fun quiz. I’ll be checking out the other ones later. Thanks!
    Merry Christmas!!

    Reply
  86. I got five right which must be verging on the miraculous as I have a bit of a thing about Dickens having been forcefed him at school. I did actually read the Christmas Carol about three years ago when I found a copy gathering dust on a shelf just before Christmas and decided that I really should make the effort and was quite surprised that I enjoyed it !!

    Reply
  87. I got five right which must be verging on the miraculous as I have a bit of a thing about Dickens having been forcefed him at school. I did actually read the Christmas Carol about three years ago when I found a copy gathering dust on a shelf just before Christmas and decided that I really should make the effort and was quite surprised that I enjoyed it !!

    Reply
  88. I got five right which must be verging on the miraculous as I have a bit of a thing about Dickens having been forcefed him at school. I did actually read the Christmas Carol about three years ago when I found a copy gathering dust on a shelf just before Christmas and decided that I really should make the effort and was quite surprised that I enjoyed it !!

    Reply
  89. I got five right which must be verging on the miraculous as I have a bit of a thing about Dickens having been forcefed him at school. I did actually read the Christmas Carol about three years ago when I found a copy gathering dust on a shelf just before Christmas and decided that I really should make the effort and was quite surprised that I enjoyed it !!

    Reply
  90. I got five right which must be verging on the miraculous as I have a bit of a thing about Dickens having been forcefed him at school. I did actually read the Christmas Carol about three years ago when I found a copy gathering dust on a shelf just before Christmas and decided that I really should make the effort and was quite surprised that I enjoyed it !!

    Reply
  91. It was just Sir Patrick, a chair, a table, a book and some modest lighting effects – no cast of hundreds, no lavish CGI, no symphonic score. He did all the characters, he danced the Roger de Coverley, he was a child, he was an old man, he was a ghost – and you could have heard a pin drop. Many were there because they were trekkies, but I didn’t hear one sneer about *those people* afterwards, though several had clearly been dragged along to see a Star Trek captain against their wills. At the end Sir Patrick took a bow for himself, and held up the book so Charles Dickens could take a bow as well. When the spell was broken, he seemed a little abashed at all the applause.

    Reply
  92. It was just Sir Patrick, a chair, a table, a book and some modest lighting effects – no cast of hundreds, no lavish CGI, no symphonic score. He did all the characters, he danced the Roger de Coverley, he was a child, he was an old man, he was a ghost – and you could have heard a pin drop. Many were there because they were trekkies, but I didn’t hear one sneer about *those people* afterwards, though several had clearly been dragged along to see a Star Trek captain against their wills. At the end Sir Patrick took a bow for himself, and held up the book so Charles Dickens could take a bow as well. When the spell was broken, he seemed a little abashed at all the applause.

    Reply
  93. It was just Sir Patrick, a chair, a table, a book and some modest lighting effects – no cast of hundreds, no lavish CGI, no symphonic score. He did all the characters, he danced the Roger de Coverley, he was a child, he was an old man, he was a ghost – and you could have heard a pin drop. Many were there because they were trekkies, but I didn’t hear one sneer about *those people* afterwards, though several had clearly been dragged along to see a Star Trek captain against their wills. At the end Sir Patrick took a bow for himself, and held up the book so Charles Dickens could take a bow as well. When the spell was broken, he seemed a little abashed at all the applause.

    Reply
  94. It was just Sir Patrick, a chair, a table, a book and some modest lighting effects – no cast of hundreds, no lavish CGI, no symphonic score. He did all the characters, he danced the Roger de Coverley, he was a child, he was an old man, he was a ghost – and you could have heard a pin drop. Many were there because they were trekkies, but I didn’t hear one sneer about *those people* afterwards, though several had clearly been dragged along to see a Star Trek captain against their wills. At the end Sir Patrick took a bow for himself, and held up the book so Charles Dickens could take a bow as well. When the spell was broken, he seemed a little abashed at all the applause.

    Reply
  95. It was just Sir Patrick, a chair, a table, a book and some modest lighting effects – no cast of hundreds, no lavish CGI, no symphonic score. He did all the characters, he danced the Roger de Coverley, he was a child, he was an old man, he was a ghost – and you could have heard a pin drop. Many were there because they were trekkies, but I didn’t hear one sneer about *those people* afterwards, though several had clearly been dragged along to see a Star Trek captain against their wills. At the end Sir Patrick took a bow for himself, and held up the book so Charles Dickens could take a bow as well. When the spell was broken, he seemed a little abashed at all the applause.

    Reply
  96. Janice it sounds superb. I love it that the trekkie-sneerers got their comeuppance in seeing that actors who act on start trek can also be brilliant actors in other realms. I wish I’d seen it. I would love to have more of that kind of performance touring — nothing but talent and skill and cleverness — and spell-binding enchantment. Thanks so much for telling us about it.
    My experience with the Royal Shakespeare Company was similar in that it was just 5 people sitting on a chair on the school stage – no other equipment. Each one in turn stood up and recited/acted –without a mike — and yet whether they spoke in a whisper or a murmur or a shout, every word could be heard right to the back corner of the school hall. And yes, you could have heard a pin drop.

    Reply
  97. Janice it sounds superb. I love it that the trekkie-sneerers got their comeuppance in seeing that actors who act on start trek can also be brilliant actors in other realms. I wish I’d seen it. I would love to have more of that kind of performance touring — nothing but talent and skill and cleverness — and spell-binding enchantment. Thanks so much for telling us about it.
    My experience with the Royal Shakespeare Company was similar in that it was just 5 people sitting on a chair on the school stage – no other equipment. Each one in turn stood up and recited/acted –without a mike — and yet whether they spoke in a whisper or a murmur or a shout, every word could be heard right to the back corner of the school hall. And yes, you could have heard a pin drop.

    Reply
  98. Janice it sounds superb. I love it that the trekkie-sneerers got their comeuppance in seeing that actors who act on start trek can also be brilliant actors in other realms. I wish I’d seen it. I would love to have more of that kind of performance touring — nothing but talent and skill and cleverness — and spell-binding enchantment. Thanks so much for telling us about it.
    My experience with the Royal Shakespeare Company was similar in that it was just 5 people sitting on a chair on the school stage – no other equipment. Each one in turn stood up and recited/acted –without a mike — and yet whether they spoke in a whisper or a murmur or a shout, every word could be heard right to the back corner of the school hall. And yes, you could have heard a pin drop.

    Reply
  99. Janice it sounds superb. I love it that the trekkie-sneerers got their comeuppance in seeing that actors who act on start trek can also be brilliant actors in other realms. I wish I’d seen it. I would love to have more of that kind of performance touring — nothing but talent and skill and cleverness — and spell-binding enchantment. Thanks so much for telling us about it.
    My experience with the Royal Shakespeare Company was similar in that it was just 5 people sitting on a chair on the school stage – no other equipment. Each one in turn stood up and recited/acted –without a mike — and yet whether they spoke in a whisper or a murmur or a shout, every word could be heard right to the back corner of the school hall. And yes, you could have heard a pin drop.

    Reply
  100. Janice it sounds superb. I love it that the trekkie-sneerers got their comeuppance in seeing that actors who act on start trek can also be brilliant actors in other realms. I wish I’d seen it. I would love to have more of that kind of performance touring — nothing but talent and skill and cleverness — and spell-binding enchantment. Thanks so much for telling us about it.
    My experience with the Royal Shakespeare Company was similar in that it was just 5 people sitting on a chair on the school stage – no other equipment. Each one in turn stood up and recited/acted –without a mike — and yet whether they spoke in a whisper or a murmur or a shout, every word could be heard right to the back corner of the school hall. And yes, you could have heard a pin drop.

    Reply
  101. Well done, Alison — six is a good result. Yes, it’s amazing how much of our modern everyday English expressions originated with The Bard and that people who wouldn’t be able to name a Shakespeare play or poem, nevertheless quote him daily.

    Reply
  102. Well done, Alison — six is a good result. Yes, it’s amazing how much of our modern everyday English expressions originated with The Bard and that people who wouldn’t be able to name a Shakespeare play or poem, nevertheless quote him daily.

    Reply
  103. Well done, Alison — six is a good result. Yes, it’s amazing how much of our modern everyday English expressions originated with The Bard and that people who wouldn’t be able to name a Shakespeare play or poem, nevertheless quote him daily.

    Reply
  104. Well done, Alison — six is a good result. Yes, it’s amazing how much of our modern everyday English expressions originated with The Bard and that people who wouldn’t be able to name a Shakespeare play or poem, nevertheless quote him daily.

    Reply
  105. Well done, Alison — six is a good result. Yes, it’s amazing how much of our modern everyday English expressions originated with The Bard and that people who wouldn’t be able to name a Shakespeare play or poem, nevertheless quote him daily.

    Reply
  106. Karin, you’re probably right about Tiny Tim — though he certainly ignored public sentiment about Little Nell — but as far as I know there’s no recorded explanation — just that belated addendum in the final final version of the proofs — not even the final manuscript. Have a happy Christmas.

    Reply
  107. Karin, you’re probably right about Tiny Tim — though he certainly ignored public sentiment about Little Nell — but as far as I know there’s no recorded explanation — just that belated addendum in the final final version of the proofs — not even the final manuscript. Have a happy Christmas.

    Reply
  108. Karin, you’re probably right about Tiny Tim — though he certainly ignored public sentiment about Little Nell — but as far as I know there’s no recorded explanation — just that belated addendum in the final final version of the proofs — not even the final manuscript. Have a happy Christmas.

    Reply
  109. Karin, you’re probably right about Tiny Tim — though he certainly ignored public sentiment about Little Nell — but as far as I know there’s no recorded explanation — just that belated addendum in the final final version of the proofs — not even the final manuscript. Have a happy Christmas.

    Reply
  110. Karin, you’re probably right about Tiny Tim — though he certainly ignored public sentiment about Little Nell — but as far as I know there’s no recorded explanation — just that belated addendum in the final final version of the proofs — not even the final manuscript. Have a happy Christmas.

    Reply
  111. Glenda, it was probably the article that inspired me to make up the quiz. And my alternatives to some questions were sneaky, I know, and often very plausible— so well done.
    Have a lovely Christmas.

    Reply
  112. Glenda, it was probably the article that inspired me to make up the quiz. And my alternatives to some questions were sneaky, I know, and often very plausible— so well done.
    Have a lovely Christmas.

    Reply
  113. Glenda, it was probably the article that inspired me to make up the quiz. And my alternatives to some questions were sneaky, I know, and often very plausible— so well done.
    Have a lovely Christmas.

    Reply
  114. Glenda, it was probably the article that inspired me to make up the quiz. And my alternatives to some questions were sneaky, I know, and often very plausible— so well done.
    Have a lovely Christmas.

    Reply
  115. Glenda, it was probably the article that inspired me to make up the quiz. And my alternatives to some questions were sneaky, I know, and often very plausible— so well done.
    Have a lovely Christmas.

    Reply
  116. Jo, it’s a perennial problem, isn’t it — whether kids should be, as you said ‘force-fed’ classic literature, or whether you risk the kids never being exposed to greatness, or maybe not greatness but important literature. Often exposure to some books comes about 5 years too early, but the damage has been done.
    The best teachers IMO are those who can motivate the kids to enjoy it.
    Happy Christmas.

    Reply
  117. Jo, it’s a perennial problem, isn’t it — whether kids should be, as you said ‘force-fed’ classic literature, or whether you risk the kids never being exposed to greatness, or maybe not greatness but important literature. Often exposure to some books comes about 5 years too early, but the damage has been done.
    The best teachers IMO are those who can motivate the kids to enjoy it.
    Happy Christmas.

    Reply
  118. Jo, it’s a perennial problem, isn’t it — whether kids should be, as you said ‘force-fed’ classic literature, or whether you risk the kids never being exposed to greatness, or maybe not greatness but important literature. Often exposure to some books comes about 5 years too early, but the damage has been done.
    The best teachers IMO are those who can motivate the kids to enjoy it.
    Happy Christmas.

    Reply
  119. Jo, it’s a perennial problem, isn’t it — whether kids should be, as you said ‘force-fed’ classic literature, or whether you risk the kids never being exposed to greatness, or maybe not greatness but important literature. Often exposure to some books comes about 5 years too early, but the damage has been done.
    The best teachers IMO are those who can motivate the kids to enjoy it.
    Happy Christmas.

    Reply
  120. Jo, it’s a perennial problem, isn’t it — whether kids should be, as you said ‘force-fed’ classic literature, or whether you risk the kids never being exposed to greatness, or maybe not greatness but important literature. Often exposure to some books comes about 5 years too early, but the damage has been done.
    The best teachers IMO are those who can motivate the kids to enjoy it.
    Happy Christmas.

    Reply
  121. I only got four right! 🙁 However I do own DVD’s of almost every version of A Christmas Carol except the Muppet version which I am on the hunt for as we speak! LOVE Dickens and LOVE The Muppets so it will be a hit with me I am certain!
    I have fond memories of four of the five years I taught English grammar and literature to high school students. I tried to make Shakespeare and Dickens and Austen real to my students, to make the stories and characters something to which they could relate.
    I even went bungee jumping to ensure they read four Shakespeare plays rather than two one year. They bet I wouldn’t do it. Never dare a teacher on a mission!

    Reply
  122. I only got four right! 🙁 However I do own DVD’s of almost every version of A Christmas Carol except the Muppet version which I am on the hunt for as we speak! LOVE Dickens and LOVE The Muppets so it will be a hit with me I am certain!
    I have fond memories of four of the five years I taught English grammar and literature to high school students. I tried to make Shakespeare and Dickens and Austen real to my students, to make the stories and characters something to which they could relate.
    I even went bungee jumping to ensure they read four Shakespeare plays rather than two one year. They bet I wouldn’t do it. Never dare a teacher on a mission!

    Reply
  123. I only got four right! 🙁 However I do own DVD’s of almost every version of A Christmas Carol except the Muppet version which I am on the hunt for as we speak! LOVE Dickens and LOVE The Muppets so it will be a hit with me I am certain!
    I have fond memories of four of the five years I taught English grammar and literature to high school students. I tried to make Shakespeare and Dickens and Austen real to my students, to make the stories and characters something to which they could relate.
    I even went bungee jumping to ensure they read four Shakespeare plays rather than two one year. They bet I wouldn’t do it. Never dare a teacher on a mission!

    Reply
  124. I only got four right! 🙁 However I do own DVD’s of almost every version of A Christmas Carol except the Muppet version which I am on the hunt for as we speak! LOVE Dickens and LOVE The Muppets so it will be a hit with me I am certain!
    I have fond memories of four of the five years I taught English grammar and literature to high school students. I tried to make Shakespeare and Dickens and Austen real to my students, to make the stories and characters something to which they could relate.
    I even went bungee jumping to ensure they read four Shakespeare plays rather than two one year. They bet I wouldn’t do it. Never dare a teacher on a mission!

    Reply
  125. I only got four right! 🙁 However I do own DVD’s of almost every version of A Christmas Carol except the Muppet version which I am on the hunt for as we speak! LOVE Dickens and LOVE The Muppets so it will be a hit with me I am certain!
    I have fond memories of four of the five years I taught English grammar and literature to high school students. I tried to make Shakespeare and Dickens and Austen real to my students, to make the stories and characters something to which they could relate.
    I even went bungee jumping to ensure they read four Shakespeare plays rather than two one year. They bet I wouldn’t do it. Never dare a teacher on a mission!

    Reply

Leave a Comment