A Book at Bedtime

The three hostagesNicola here, talking today about listening to stories, not as audio books but as serializations. On 31st January 1949 the first edition of BBC Radio’s "Book at Bedtime" was broadcast. It ran every night for 15 minutes between 10.45pm and 11pm. The first book that was serialized was John Buchan’s The Three Hostages, a rip-roaring adventure story written in 1924. In the months and years that followed, all sorts of literature from the classics to new releases has and continues to be featured on the program, although perhaps there hasn't been as much genre fiction as there might have been. In fact only a year or so ago the BBC admitted that they were looking for happier endings after noticing that listeners had been put off by “gratuitously violent and tragic stories.” Well, yeah – I don’t know about you but I wouldn’t want to drift off to sleep with images of violence or misery into my mind! 

According to The Times, a brief circulated to potential producers at the time stated: “We will always aim to select a variety but we Stencil.default (3) would like to be offered more titles that are pure pleasure, diversion or even comedy. Happy endings are often a bit too rare in what we are asked to consider. We can listen to sad or disturbing stories if they are ultimately redemptive, but a gratuitously violent or tragic ending is upsetting, infuriating and can seem distasteful.” The note adds that “listeners rarely enjoy being cheated with ambiguity or uncertainty”, implying a preference for plotlines that are neatly resolved. Again, that's a yes from me; I don't mind stories where some elements are left unresolved for the reader or listener to decide on, but if that happened just before I was going to sleep I'd lie awake thinking about it!

Images (1)Of course a radio program isn’t exactly like listening to an audio book since it gives an abridged version of the story. It always strikes me that this must be a tricky job; how do you decide which bits to leave in and which to cut out without damaging the story? How easy or not is it to divide a book up into equal 15-minute episodes? When you’re reading, or listening to an audio book you can decide when and where is the appropriate time to stop. On a radio or TV program you don’t have any control over that which can be frustrating if you want to “read” on. I remember as a child loving the stories at the end of the Basil Brush Show but getting cross when the narrator slammed the book shut with the words: “and that's all we've got time for this week, Basil". Nooo! I wanted to hear more of Basil's adventures. When I was younger I also enjoyed the Readers Digest abridged books, four stories in one volume, although they could sometimes feel a bit abrupt, no doubt because the editor had had to cut the story back.

Another children’s story time program, Jackanory, was a massive favourite with me. The starting question: “Are you sitting comfortably?” was an invitation to Jackanory-2006 snuggle up with some hot milk and really get into the story. When Jackanory began, some people were apparently worried that it would lead to fewer children reading for themselves but in fact the reverse was true and there was a big increase in library loans of books by the authors featured on the program and of prequels and sequels.

But with such a variety of ways to consume books these days, is there still a place for radio or TV programs where people read to you? And with our short attention spans, are bite-sized installments of books a good thing or are we too keen to rush to the end?

Reading aloudFor much of history, reading was a noisy activity – storytelling was essentially communal – but these days it’s largely silent. However a growing body of research suggests that we may be missing out by reading only with the voices inside our minds. The ancient art of reading aloud has a number of benefits for adults, from helping improve our memories and understand complex texts, to strengthening emotional bonds between people.

Going back to the idea of a book at bedtime, reading in bed used to be one of my favourite things to do until a few years Stencil.facebook-cover (3) ago when I found that if I read a book before I turned out the light, instead of sleeping I would lie awake for ages thinking about it – or fall asleep and dream about it. Nor did the book need to be very exciting to make me do this. It was so tiring I had to stop! These days I prefer to have a lie in with a book and a nice cup of tea in the morning, and go to sleep with a relaxation tape.

So what do you think? Do you ever listen to book serializations? Do you enjoy readings at literature festivals or soirees? And how do you feel about reading or listening to books just before you go to sleep? Does that work for you?

150 thoughts on “A Book at Bedtime”

  1. I love a book at bedtime it is the best time of the day. Yes sometimes I wonder who’s done it or where will I be tomorrow. The biggest problem I have is that if I get to a really good part I have to keep going long after it should be lights out. As I child I loved being read to but it didn’t stop me going to the library every week. Books at bedtime is a yes from me.

    Reply
  2. I love a book at bedtime it is the best time of the day. Yes sometimes I wonder who’s done it or where will I be tomorrow. The biggest problem I have is that if I get to a really good part I have to keep going long after it should be lights out. As I child I loved being read to but it didn’t stop me going to the library every week. Books at bedtime is a yes from me.

    Reply
  3. I love a book at bedtime it is the best time of the day. Yes sometimes I wonder who’s done it or where will I be tomorrow. The biggest problem I have is that if I get to a really good part I have to keep going long after it should be lights out. As I child I loved being read to but it didn’t stop me going to the library every week. Books at bedtime is a yes from me.

    Reply
  4. I love a book at bedtime it is the best time of the day. Yes sometimes I wonder who’s done it or where will I be tomorrow. The biggest problem I have is that if I get to a really good part I have to keep going long after it should be lights out. As I child I loved being read to but it didn’t stop me going to the library every week. Books at bedtime is a yes from me.

    Reply
  5. I love a book at bedtime it is the best time of the day. Yes sometimes I wonder who’s done it or where will I be tomorrow. The biggest problem I have is that if I get to a really good part I have to keep going long after it should be lights out. As I child I loved being read to but it didn’t stop me going to the library every week. Books at bedtime is a yes from me.

    Reply
  6. Hi Margaret, yes the temptation to read on into the night is strong, isn’t it, but then I suppose that proves it’s a good book! I love that like me you were a fan of having stories read to you; I think it only encourages more reading, not less!

    Reply
  7. Hi Margaret, yes the temptation to read on into the night is strong, isn’t it, but then I suppose that proves it’s a good book! I love that like me you were a fan of having stories read to you; I think it only encourages more reading, not less!

    Reply
  8. Hi Margaret, yes the temptation to read on into the night is strong, isn’t it, but then I suppose that proves it’s a good book! I love that like me you were a fan of having stories read to you; I think it only encourages more reading, not less!

    Reply
  9. Hi Margaret, yes the temptation to read on into the night is strong, isn’t it, but then I suppose that proves it’s a good book! I love that like me you were a fan of having stories read to you; I think it only encourages more reading, not less!

    Reply
  10. Hi Margaret, yes the temptation to read on into the night is strong, isn’t it, but then I suppose that proves it’s a good book! I love that like me you were a fan of having stories read to you; I think it only encourages more reading, not less!

    Reply
  11. I have never been one to read right before I go to bed. When I’m ready to sleep, I don’t want any distractions. Nowadays, if the TV is on when I go to bed, it is on something so old and boring that it doesn’t stand a chance of keeping me awake.
    When I was a child my mother would either sing a song or tell a story at bedtime. If she told a story it was either a classic fairytale or one she made up. She did read books to us, but it was usually earlier in the evening. I’m guessing it was an evenings when there was nothing on the radio she wanted to listen to. Us kids really enjoyed it though.
    As for reading aloud – I frequently find myself doing that. I don’t do it on purpose, but I live alone now, and the cat doesn’t seem to mind (smile).

    Reply
  12. I have never been one to read right before I go to bed. When I’m ready to sleep, I don’t want any distractions. Nowadays, if the TV is on when I go to bed, it is on something so old and boring that it doesn’t stand a chance of keeping me awake.
    When I was a child my mother would either sing a song or tell a story at bedtime. If she told a story it was either a classic fairytale or one she made up. She did read books to us, but it was usually earlier in the evening. I’m guessing it was an evenings when there was nothing on the radio she wanted to listen to. Us kids really enjoyed it though.
    As for reading aloud – I frequently find myself doing that. I don’t do it on purpose, but I live alone now, and the cat doesn’t seem to mind (smile).

    Reply
  13. I have never been one to read right before I go to bed. When I’m ready to sleep, I don’t want any distractions. Nowadays, if the TV is on when I go to bed, it is on something so old and boring that it doesn’t stand a chance of keeping me awake.
    When I was a child my mother would either sing a song or tell a story at bedtime. If she told a story it was either a classic fairytale or one she made up. She did read books to us, but it was usually earlier in the evening. I’m guessing it was an evenings when there was nothing on the radio she wanted to listen to. Us kids really enjoyed it though.
    As for reading aloud – I frequently find myself doing that. I don’t do it on purpose, but I live alone now, and the cat doesn’t seem to mind (smile).

    Reply
  14. I have never been one to read right before I go to bed. When I’m ready to sleep, I don’t want any distractions. Nowadays, if the TV is on when I go to bed, it is on something so old and boring that it doesn’t stand a chance of keeping me awake.
    When I was a child my mother would either sing a song or tell a story at bedtime. If she told a story it was either a classic fairytale or one she made up. She did read books to us, but it was usually earlier in the evening. I’m guessing it was an evenings when there was nothing on the radio she wanted to listen to. Us kids really enjoyed it though.
    As for reading aloud – I frequently find myself doing that. I don’t do it on purpose, but I live alone now, and the cat doesn’t seem to mind (smile).

    Reply
  15. I have never been one to read right before I go to bed. When I’m ready to sleep, I don’t want any distractions. Nowadays, if the TV is on when I go to bed, it is on something so old and boring that it doesn’t stand a chance of keeping me awake.
    When I was a child my mother would either sing a song or tell a story at bedtime. If she told a story it was either a classic fairytale or one she made up. She did read books to us, but it was usually earlier in the evening. I’m guessing it was an evenings when there was nothing on the radio she wanted to listen to. Us kids really enjoyed it though.
    As for reading aloud – I frequently find myself doing that. I don’t do it on purpose, but I live alone now, and the cat doesn’t seem to mind (smile).

    Reply
  16. I’m with you on that, Mary! Any distractions are likely to keep me awake! I love the idea of you having songs as well as stories at bedtime as a child. And what a talented mother to make up her own stories for you!

    Reply
  17. I’m with you on that, Mary! Any distractions are likely to keep me awake! I love the idea of you having songs as well as stories at bedtime as a child. And what a talented mother to make up her own stories for you!

    Reply
  18. I’m with you on that, Mary! Any distractions are likely to keep me awake! I love the idea of you having songs as well as stories at bedtime as a child. And what a talented mother to make up her own stories for you!

    Reply
  19. I’m with you on that, Mary! Any distractions are likely to keep me awake! I love the idea of you having songs as well as stories at bedtime as a child. And what a talented mother to make up her own stories for you!

    Reply
  20. I’m with you on that, Mary! Any distractions are likely to keep me awake! I love the idea of you having songs as well as stories at bedtime as a child. And what a talented mother to make up her own stories for you!

    Reply
  21. I loved stories at bedtime when I was a child. My father used to tell us stories—mostly Robin Hood, or Norse or Classical myths. (The proved very useful when reading English lit with all the classical allusions!)
    These days, I like to read at bedtime, but I’m very careful about what I choose because it’s apt to affect my dreams and I don’t want nightmares. This means I do a lot of rereading just before the lights go out so I know there’s a happy ending in sight.
    Speaking of abridged books, there was an old Betty Comdon-Adolph Green number about Reader’s Digest condensed books. One of them was:
    Les Miserable
    Jean Valjean, no evil doer,
    Stole some bread cause he was poor.
    A detective chased him through the sewer.
    THE END!

    Reply
  22. I loved stories at bedtime when I was a child. My father used to tell us stories—mostly Robin Hood, or Norse or Classical myths. (The proved very useful when reading English lit with all the classical allusions!)
    These days, I like to read at bedtime, but I’m very careful about what I choose because it’s apt to affect my dreams and I don’t want nightmares. This means I do a lot of rereading just before the lights go out so I know there’s a happy ending in sight.
    Speaking of abridged books, there was an old Betty Comdon-Adolph Green number about Reader’s Digest condensed books. One of them was:
    Les Miserable
    Jean Valjean, no evil doer,
    Stole some bread cause he was poor.
    A detective chased him through the sewer.
    THE END!

    Reply
  23. I loved stories at bedtime when I was a child. My father used to tell us stories—mostly Robin Hood, or Norse or Classical myths. (The proved very useful when reading English lit with all the classical allusions!)
    These days, I like to read at bedtime, but I’m very careful about what I choose because it’s apt to affect my dreams and I don’t want nightmares. This means I do a lot of rereading just before the lights go out so I know there’s a happy ending in sight.
    Speaking of abridged books, there was an old Betty Comdon-Adolph Green number about Reader’s Digest condensed books. One of them was:
    Les Miserable
    Jean Valjean, no evil doer,
    Stole some bread cause he was poor.
    A detective chased him through the sewer.
    THE END!

    Reply
  24. I loved stories at bedtime when I was a child. My father used to tell us stories—mostly Robin Hood, or Norse or Classical myths. (The proved very useful when reading English lit with all the classical allusions!)
    These days, I like to read at bedtime, but I’m very careful about what I choose because it’s apt to affect my dreams and I don’t want nightmares. This means I do a lot of rereading just before the lights go out so I know there’s a happy ending in sight.
    Speaking of abridged books, there was an old Betty Comdon-Adolph Green number about Reader’s Digest condensed books. One of them was:
    Les Miserable
    Jean Valjean, no evil doer,
    Stole some bread cause he was poor.
    A detective chased him through the sewer.
    THE END!

    Reply
  25. I loved stories at bedtime when I was a child. My father used to tell us stories—mostly Robin Hood, or Norse or Classical myths. (The proved very useful when reading English lit with all the classical allusions!)
    These days, I like to read at bedtime, but I’m very careful about what I choose because it’s apt to affect my dreams and I don’t want nightmares. This means I do a lot of rereading just before the lights go out so I know there’s a happy ending in sight.
    Speaking of abridged books, there was an old Betty Comdon-Adolph Green number about Reader’s Digest condensed books. One of them was:
    Les Miserable
    Jean Valjean, no evil doer,
    Stole some bread cause he was poor.
    A detective chased him through the sewer.
    THE END!

    Reply
  26. I’m the same as you – if I’m reading before bedtime and I don’t get a chance to finish, I lie awake thinking about it. I’ve come to the conclusion I might as well just keep reading! I don’t like being read to, I’m too impatient and also I prefer to see the words for myself. They go into my brain in a different way then. Fascinating topic!

    Reply
  27. I’m the same as you – if I’m reading before bedtime and I don’t get a chance to finish, I lie awake thinking about it. I’ve come to the conclusion I might as well just keep reading! I don’t like being read to, I’m too impatient and also I prefer to see the words for myself. They go into my brain in a different way then. Fascinating topic!

    Reply
  28. I’m the same as you – if I’m reading before bedtime and I don’t get a chance to finish, I lie awake thinking about it. I’ve come to the conclusion I might as well just keep reading! I don’t like being read to, I’m too impatient and also I prefer to see the words for myself. They go into my brain in a different way then. Fascinating topic!

    Reply
  29. I’m the same as you – if I’m reading before bedtime and I don’t get a chance to finish, I lie awake thinking about it. I’ve come to the conclusion I might as well just keep reading! I don’t like being read to, I’m too impatient and also I prefer to see the words for myself. They go into my brain in a different way then. Fascinating topic!

    Reply
  30. I’m the same as you – if I’m reading before bedtime and I don’t get a chance to finish, I lie awake thinking about it. I’ve come to the conclusion I might as well just keep reading! I don’t like being read to, I’m too impatient and also I prefer to see the words for myself. They go into my brain in a different way then. Fascinating topic!

    Reply
  31. I love those lines on the Readers Digest books, Lil. You could have a lot of fun doing that for a number of classics! How lovely to have had such classic stories read to you as a child as well.
    It’s interesting that a number of us have the same issue about dreaming about the things we’ve been reading if we read something stimulating too close to bedtime!

    Reply
  32. I love those lines on the Readers Digest books, Lil. You could have a lot of fun doing that for a number of classics! How lovely to have had such classic stories read to you as a child as well.
    It’s interesting that a number of us have the same issue about dreaming about the things we’ve been reading if we read something stimulating too close to bedtime!

    Reply
  33. I love those lines on the Readers Digest books, Lil. You could have a lot of fun doing that for a number of classics! How lovely to have had such classic stories read to you as a child as well.
    It’s interesting that a number of us have the same issue about dreaming about the things we’ve been reading if we read something stimulating too close to bedtime!

    Reply
  34. I love those lines on the Readers Digest books, Lil. You could have a lot of fun doing that for a number of classics! How lovely to have had such classic stories read to you as a child as well.
    It’s interesting that a number of us have the same issue about dreaming about the things we’ve been reading if we read something stimulating too close to bedtime!

    Reply
  35. I love those lines on the Readers Digest books, Lil. You could have a lot of fun doing that for a number of classics! How lovely to have had such classic stories read to you as a child as well.
    It’s interesting that a number of us have the same issue about dreaming about the things we’ve been reading if we read something stimulating too close to bedtime!

    Reply
  36. Haha! Yes, you might as well just carry on and finish the book. That’s very interesting that you don’t like being read to, Christina, but prefer to see the words. Fascinating to think that we process stories differently depending on how we hear or see them.

    Reply
  37. Haha! Yes, you might as well just carry on and finish the book. That’s very interesting that you don’t like being read to, Christina, but prefer to see the words. Fascinating to think that we process stories differently depending on how we hear or see them.

    Reply
  38. Haha! Yes, you might as well just carry on and finish the book. That’s very interesting that you don’t like being read to, Christina, but prefer to see the words. Fascinating to think that we process stories differently depending on how we hear or see them.

    Reply
  39. Haha! Yes, you might as well just carry on and finish the book. That’s very interesting that you don’t like being read to, Christina, but prefer to see the words. Fascinating to think that we process stories differently depending on how we hear or see them.

    Reply
  40. Haha! Yes, you might as well just carry on and finish the book. That’s very interesting that you don’t like being read to, Christina, but prefer to see the words. Fascinating to think that we process stories differently depending on how we hear or see them.

    Reply
  41. I love to read before bed, but generally not in bed because that’s when I stay up way too late. But I’ll read until I want to go to sleep and then go through my nightly routine. I don’t usually stay awake because of what I’m reading. I absolutely cannot have tv on. I don’t even have one in my bedroom.

    Reply
  42. I love to read before bed, but generally not in bed because that’s when I stay up way too late. But I’ll read until I want to go to sleep and then go through my nightly routine. I don’t usually stay awake because of what I’m reading. I absolutely cannot have tv on. I don’t even have one in my bedroom.

    Reply
  43. I love to read before bed, but generally not in bed because that’s when I stay up way too late. But I’ll read until I want to go to sleep and then go through my nightly routine. I don’t usually stay awake because of what I’m reading. I absolutely cannot have tv on. I don’t even have one in my bedroom.

    Reply
  44. I love to read before bed, but generally not in bed because that’s when I stay up way too late. But I’ll read until I want to go to sleep and then go through my nightly routine. I don’t usually stay awake because of what I’m reading. I absolutely cannot have tv on. I don’t even have one in my bedroom.

    Reply
  45. I love to read before bed, but generally not in bed because that’s when I stay up way too late. But I’ll read until I want to go to sleep and then go through my nightly routine. I don’t usually stay awake because of what I’m reading. I absolutely cannot have tv on. I don’t even have one in my bedroom.

    Reply
  46. Isn’t it interesting how we all have these different approaches! Like you, Misti, I can read in an evening as long as it’s not too late and not in bed. And I don’t have a TV either. I think that would definitely disrupt my sleep if I watched it beforehand.

    Reply
  47. Isn’t it interesting how we all have these different approaches! Like you, Misti, I can read in an evening as long as it’s not too late and not in bed. And I don’t have a TV either. I think that would definitely disrupt my sleep if I watched it beforehand.

    Reply
  48. Isn’t it interesting how we all have these different approaches! Like you, Misti, I can read in an evening as long as it’s not too late and not in bed. And I don’t have a TV either. I think that would definitely disrupt my sleep if I watched it beforehand.

    Reply
  49. Isn’t it interesting how we all have these different approaches! Like you, Misti, I can read in an evening as long as it’s not too late and not in bed. And I don’t have a TV either. I think that would definitely disrupt my sleep if I watched it beforehand.

    Reply
  50. Isn’t it interesting how we all have these different approaches! Like you, Misti, I can read in an evening as long as it’s not too late and not in bed. And I don’t have a TV either. I think that would definitely disrupt my sleep if I watched it beforehand.

    Reply
  51. I generally read before going to sleep; if I start a new book there is always the risk that I’ll join the (as I’ve heard it called) Bad Decisions Book Club and stay up way too late/early. For that reason, I often read book samples before sleep; of course, that has the danger that I might purchase the book and … see above.
    I only rarely listen to audio books as I have a tendency to nod off.
    What intrigued me about your post, Nicola, was that the show aired between “10.45pm and 11pm.” While I’m generally up later than that, I’d think more people might already be abed.

    Reply
  52. I generally read before going to sleep; if I start a new book there is always the risk that I’ll join the (as I’ve heard it called) Bad Decisions Book Club and stay up way too late/early. For that reason, I often read book samples before sleep; of course, that has the danger that I might purchase the book and … see above.
    I only rarely listen to audio books as I have a tendency to nod off.
    What intrigued me about your post, Nicola, was that the show aired between “10.45pm and 11pm.” While I’m generally up later than that, I’d think more people might already be abed.

    Reply
  53. I generally read before going to sleep; if I start a new book there is always the risk that I’ll join the (as I’ve heard it called) Bad Decisions Book Club and stay up way too late/early. For that reason, I often read book samples before sleep; of course, that has the danger that I might purchase the book and … see above.
    I only rarely listen to audio books as I have a tendency to nod off.
    What intrigued me about your post, Nicola, was that the show aired between “10.45pm and 11pm.” While I’m generally up later than that, I’d think more people might already be abed.

    Reply
  54. I generally read before going to sleep; if I start a new book there is always the risk that I’ll join the (as I’ve heard it called) Bad Decisions Book Club and stay up way too late/early. For that reason, I often read book samples before sleep; of course, that has the danger that I might purchase the book and … see above.
    I only rarely listen to audio books as I have a tendency to nod off.
    What intrigued me about your post, Nicola, was that the show aired between “10.45pm and 11pm.” While I’m generally up later than that, I’d think more people might already be abed.

    Reply
  55. I generally read before going to sleep; if I start a new book there is always the risk that I’ll join the (as I’ve heard it called) Bad Decisions Book Club and stay up way too late/early. For that reason, I often read book samples before sleep; of course, that has the danger that I might purchase the book and … see above.
    I only rarely listen to audio books as I have a tendency to nod off.
    What intrigued me about your post, Nicola, was that the show aired between “10.45pm and 11pm.” While I’m generally up later than that, I’d think more people might already be abed.

    Reply
  56. I have a collection of audiobooks that I listen to only at bedtime. I began doing that when at the time there were no interesting (to me) radio shows on after midnight, and the ambient noises of living in an old apartment house would tend to keep me awake.
    I listen to these books because they are old friends and I know them well – so I don’t feel I’m missing something if I fall asleep. Heyer, Tolkien, Furst, others. I sort of rotate through them. Right now it’s The Unknown Ajax again. The writing has to be smooth and the narrator has to be listenable.
    At one time a local radio station read books over the air in the dead hours and I would listen even when the reader was less than skilled at it.
    I learned to read when I was 4-ish because nobody in my family wanted to spend time reading to a child and I wanted to hear stories and be paid attention to. They weren’t readers themselves and didn’t think it was important. They were exhausted or busy or both. So now curling up in bed listening to a great story for the hundredth time is a real treat to me.

    Reply
  57. I have a collection of audiobooks that I listen to only at bedtime. I began doing that when at the time there were no interesting (to me) radio shows on after midnight, and the ambient noises of living in an old apartment house would tend to keep me awake.
    I listen to these books because they are old friends and I know them well – so I don’t feel I’m missing something if I fall asleep. Heyer, Tolkien, Furst, others. I sort of rotate through them. Right now it’s The Unknown Ajax again. The writing has to be smooth and the narrator has to be listenable.
    At one time a local radio station read books over the air in the dead hours and I would listen even when the reader was less than skilled at it.
    I learned to read when I was 4-ish because nobody in my family wanted to spend time reading to a child and I wanted to hear stories and be paid attention to. They weren’t readers themselves and didn’t think it was important. They were exhausted or busy or both. So now curling up in bed listening to a great story for the hundredth time is a real treat to me.

    Reply
  58. I have a collection of audiobooks that I listen to only at bedtime. I began doing that when at the time there were no interesting (to me) radio shows on after midnight, and the ambient noises of living in an old apartment house would tend to keep me awake.
    I listen to these books because they are old friends and I know them well – so I don’t feel I’m missing something if I fall asleep. Heyer, Tolkien, Furst, others. I sort of rotate through them. Right now it’s The Unknown Ajax again. The writing has to be smooth and the narrator has to be listenable.
    At one time a local radio station read books over the air in the dead hours and I would listen even when the reader was less than skilled at it.
    I learned to read when I was 4-ish because nobody in my family wanted to spend time reading to a child and I wanted to hear stories and be paid attention to. They weren’t readers themselves and didn’t think it was important. They were exhausted or busy or both. So now curling up in bed listening to a great story for the hundredth time is a real treat to me.

    Reply
  59. I have a collection of audiobooks that I listen to only at bedtime. I began doing that when at the time there were no interesting (to me) radio shows on after midnight, and the ambient noises of living in an old apartment house would tend to keep me awake.
    I listen to these books because they are old friends and I know them well – so I don’t feel I’m missing something if I fall asleep. Heyer, Tolkien, Furst, others. I sort of rotate through them. Right now it’s The Unknown Ajax again. The writing has to be smooth and the narrator has to be listenable.
    At one time a local radio station read books over the air in the dead hours and I would listen even when the reader was less than skilled at it.
    I learned to read when I was 4-ish because nobody in my family wanted to spend time reading to a child and I wanted to hear stories and be paid attention to. They weren’t readers themselves and didn’t think it was important. They were exhausted or busy or both. So now curling up in bed listening to a great story for the hundredth time is a real treat to me.

    Reply
  60. I have a collection of audiobooks that I listen to only at bedtime. I began doing that when at the time there were no interesting (to me) radio shows on after midnight, and the ambient noises of living in an old apartment house would tend to keep me awake.
    I listen to these books because they are old friends and I know them well – so I don’t feel I’m missing something if I fall asleep. Heyer, Tolkien, Furst, others. I sort of rotate through them. Right now it’s The Unknown Ajax again. The writing has to be smooth and the narrator has to be listenable.
    At one time a local radio station read books over the air in the dead hours and I would listen even when the reader was less than skilled at it.
    I learned to read when I was 4-ish because nobody in my family wanted to spend time reading to a child and I wanted to hear stories and be paid attention to. They weren’t readers themselves and didn’t think it was important. They were exhausted or busy or both. So now curling up in bed listening to a great story for the hundredth time is a real treat to me.

    Reply
  61. Ha! I hadn’t heard of the Bad Decisions Book Club, but that’s a great name for it! Yes, the temptation is always there to keep on reading…
    That’s an interesting point about the timing of the show. I’d definitely be in bed and hope to be asleep by then. Impossible to get a time to suit owls and early birds!

    Reply
  62. Ha! I hadn’t heard of the Bad Decisions Book Club, but that’s a great name for it! Yes, the temptation is always there to keep on reading…
    That’s an interesting point about the timing of the show. I’d definitely be in bed and hope to be asleep by then. Impossible to get a time to suit owls and early birds!

    Reply
  63. Ha! I hadn’t heard of the Bad Decisions Book Club, but that’s a great name for it! Yes, the temptation is always there to keep on reading…
    That’s an interesting point about the timing of the show. I’d definitely be in bed and hope to be asleep by then. Impossible to get a time to suit owls and early birds!

    Reply
  64. Ha! I hadn’t heard of the Bad Decisions Book Club, but that’s a great name for it! Yes, the temptation is always there to keep on reading…
    That’s an interesting point about the timing of the show. I’d definitely be in bed and hope to be asleep by then. Impossible to get a time to suit owls and early birds!

    Reply
  65. Ha! I hadn’t heard of the Bad Decisions Book Club, but that’s a great name for it! Yes, the temptation is always there to keep on reading…
    That’s an interesting point about the timing of the show. I’d definitely be in bed and hope to be asleep by then. Impossible to get a time to suit owls and early birds!

    Reply
  66. That sounds like a wonderful, relaxing routine, Janice. Clearly you were a very determined 4 year old who knew she wanted to explore books and reading. It’s wonderful that years later you can enjoy a book at bedtime!
    This also made me think of a conversation I had with a fellow author who said that she had “sleep stories” which she wrote in her head at bedtime. The familiarity and repetition quickly sent her off to sleep. I do the same and I wonder how many other authors do too. I’ve never turned any of these stories into “real” books, with the exception of one, years ago.

    Reply
  67. That sounds like a wonderful, relaxing routine, Janice. Clearly you were a very determined 4 year old who knew she wanted to explore books and reading. It’s wonderful that years later you can enjoy a book at bedtime!
    This also made me think of a conversation I had with a fellow author who said that she had “sleep stories” which she wrote in her head at bedtime. The familiarity and repetition quickly sent her off to sleep. I do the same and I wonder how many other authors do too. I’ve never turned any of these stories into “real” books, with the exception of one, years ago.

    Reply
  68. That sounds like a wonderful, relaxing routine, Janice. Clearly you were a very determined 4 year old who knew she wanted to explore books and reading. It’s wonderful that years later you can enjoy a book at bedtime!
    This also made me think of a conversation I had with a fellow author who said that she had “sleep stories” which she wrote in her head at bedtime. The familiarity and repetition quickly sent her off to sleep. I do the same and I wonder how many other authors do too. I’ve never turned any of these stories into “real” books, with the exception of one, years ago.

    Reply
  69. That sounds like a wonderful, relaxing routine, Janice. Clearly you were a very determined 4 year old who knew she wanted to explore books and reading. It’s wonderful that years later you can enjoy a book at bedtime!
    This also made me think of a conversation I had with a fellow author who said that she had “sleep stories” which she wrote in her head at bedtime. The familiarity and repetition quickly sent her off to sleep. I do the same and I wonder how many other authors do too. I’ve never turned any of these stories into “real” books, with the exception of one, years ago.

    Reply
  70. That sounds like a wonderful, relaxing routine, Janice. Clearly you were a very determined 4 year old who knew she wanted to explore books and reading. It’s wonderful that years later you can enjoy a book at bedtime!
    This also made me think of a conversation I had with a fellow author who said that she had “sleep stories” which she wrote in her head at bedtime. The familiarity and repetition quickly sent her off to sleep. I do the same and I wonder how many other authors do too. I’ve never turned any of these stories into “real” books, with the exception of one, years ago.

    Reply
  71. I feel I must be a charter member of Kareni’s Bad Decision Book Club, and Wench books are responsible for many, many long nights! I love to read at any time of the day but find it difficult to go to sleep without at least a short read. Interestingly, trying to read a magazine will put me to sleep almost immediately; books do not have the same affect at all. Years ago, I read and recorded fiction books for a radio station for the blind. All the readers for the station were volunteers, and read everything from the grocery ads in the newspaper to textbooks. The program for which I read was called Off the Shelf and aired at 8:00 PM. I would record in one hour blocks, which wasn’t always easy as chapters didn’t necessarily fall into line with the time allowed! I agree with the BBC in the choice of appropriate bedtime reading, and I always tried to choose books that had some humor, some mystery or suspense, and a happy ending.

    Reply
  72. I feel I must be a charter member of Kareni’s Bad Decision Book Club, and Wench books are responsible for many, many long nights! I love to read at any time of the day but find it difficult to go to sleep without at least a short read. Interestingly, trying to read a magazine will put me to sleep almost immediately; books do not have the same affect at all. Years ago, I read and recorded fiction books for a radio station for the blind. All the readers for the station were volunteers, and read everything from the grocery ads in the newspaper to textbooks. The program for which I read was called Off the Shelf and aired at 8:00 PM. I would record in one hour blocks, which wasn’t always easy as chapters didn’t necessarily fall into line with the time allowed! I agree with the BBC in the choice of appropriate bedtime reading, and I always tried to choose books that had some humor, some mystery or suspense, and a happy ending.

    Reply
  73. I feel I must be a charter member of Kareni’s Bad Decision Book Club, and Wench books are responsible for many, many long nights! I love to read at any time of the day but find it difficult to go to sleep without at least a short read. Interestingly, trying to read a magazine will put me to sleep almost immediately; books do not have the same affect at all. Years ago, I read and recorded fiction books for a radio station for the blind. All the readers for the station were volunteers, and read everything from the grocery ads in the newspaper to textbooks. The program for which I read was called Off the Shelf and aired at 8:00 PM. I would record in one hour blocks, which wasn’t always easy as chapters didn’t necessarily fall into line with the time allowed! I agree with the BBC in the choice of appropriate bedtime reading, and I always tried to choose books that had some humor, some mystery or suspense, and a happy ending.

    Reply
  74. I feel I must be a charter member of Kareni’s Bad Decision Book Club, and Wench books are responsible for many, many long nights! I love to read at any time of the day but find it difficult to go to sleep without at least a short read. Interestingly, trying to read a magazine will put me to sleep almost immediately; books do not have the same affect at all. Years ago, I read and recorded fiction books for a radio station for the blind. All the readers for the station were volunteers, and read everything from the grocery ads in the newspaper to textbooks. The program for which I read was called Off the Shelf and aired at 8:00 PM. I would record in one hour blocks, which wasn’t always easy as chapters didn’t necessarily fall into line with the time allowed! I agree with the BBC in the choice of appropriate bedtime reading, and I always tried to choose books that had some humor, some mystery or suspense, and a happy ending.

    Reply
  75. I feel I must be a charter member of Kareni’s Bad Decision Book Club, and Wench books are responsible for many, many long nights! I love to read at any time of the day but find it difficult to go to sleep without at least a short read. Interestingly, trying to read a magazine will put me to sleep almost immediately; books do not have the same affect at all. Years ago, I read and recorded fiction books for a radio station for the blind. All the readers for the station were volunteers, and read everything from the grocery ads in the newspaper to textbooks. The program for which I read was called Off the Shelf and aired at 8:00 PM. I would record in one hour blocks, which wasn’t always easy as chapters didn’t necessarily fall into line with the time allowed! I agree with the BBC in the choice of appropriate bedtime reading, and I always tried to choose books that had some humor, some mystery or suspense, and a happy ending.

    Reply
  76. I don’t think I’ve ever listened to a book serialization. I don’t know if they exist on U.S. radio.
    I always read in bed before sleeping, but it can’t be anything too upsetting or violent.
    The great thing about being retired is that if I do join the Bad Decisions Book Club and get caught up in a story late into the night, it doesn’t matter. I usually have time to nap during the day. However I need silence to fall asleep, so I could never nod off with the TV, radio or audio book playing.

    Reply
  77. I don’t think I’ve ever listened to a book serialization. I don’t know if they exist on U.S. radio.
    I always read in bed before sleeping, but it can’t be anything too upsetting or violent.
    The great thing about being retired is that if I do join the Bad Decisions Book Club and get caught up in a story late into the night, it doesn’t matter. I usually have time to nap during the day. However I need silence to fall asleep, so I could never nod off with the TV, radio or audio book playing.

    Reply
  78. I don’t think I’ve ever listened to a book serialization. I don’t know if they exist on U.S. radio.
    I always read in bed before sleeping, but it can’t be anything too upsetting or violent.
    The great thing about being retired is that if I do join the Bad Decisions Book Club and get caught up in a story late into the night, it doesn’t matter. I usually have time to nap during the day. However I need silence to fall asleep, so I could never nod off with the TV, radio or audio book playing.

    Reply
  79. I don’t think I’ve ever listened to a book serialization. I don’t know if they exist on U.S. radio.
    I always read in bed before sleeping, but it can’t be anything too upsetting or violent.
    The great thing about being retired is that if I do join the Bad Decisions Book Club and get caught up in a story late into the night, it doesn’t matter. I usually have time to nap during the day. However I need silence to fall asleep, so I could never nod off with the TV, radio or audio book playing.

    Reply
  80. I don’t think I’ve ever listened to a book serialization. I don’t know if they exist on U.S. radio.
    I always read in bed before sleeping, but it can’t be anything too upsetting or violent.
    The great thing about being retired is that if I do join the Bad Decisions Book Club and get caught up in a story late into the night, it doesn’t matter. I usually have time to nap during the day. However I need silence to fall asleep, so I could never nod off with the TV, radio or audio book playing.

    Reply
  81. Nicola – I’ve never been one for listening to books read on audio. Or to audible readings of books in general. The only exception is when I “attend” readings of books during the “Literary Society” events within the covers of Anne Gracie’s “Chance Sisters” series. As to bedtime reading – the habit bit me when I was 10 years old and shows no signs of subsiding. Reading is one of my besetting sins. I can’t go anywhere without a book. And I can’t go to sleep unless I’m reading at least a few pages – no matter when I actually go to bed. (I’m a night owl – another sin.) The current book on my pillow is Mary Balogh’s The Arrangement, one of her “Survivors’ Club” books.

    Reply
  82. Nicola – I’ve never been one for listening to books read on audio. Or to audible readings of books in general. The only exception is when I “attend” readings of books during the “Literary Society” events within the covers of Anne Gracie’s “Chance Sisters” series. As to bedtime reading – the habit bit me when I was 10 years old and shows no signs of subsiding. Reading is one of my besetting sins. I can’t go anywhere without a book. And I can’t go to sleep unless I’m reading at least a few pages – no matter when I actually go to bed. (I’m a night owl – another sin.) The current book on my pillow is Mary Balogh’s The Arrangement, one of her “Survivors’ Club” books.

    Reply
  83. Nicola – I’ve never been one for listening to books read on audio. Or to audible readings of books in general. The only exception is when I “attend” readings of books during the “Literary Society” events within the covers of Anne Gracie’s “Chance Sisters” series. As to bedtime reading – the habit bit me when I was 10 years old and shows no signs of subsiding. Reading is one of my besetting sins. I can’t go anywhere without a book. And I can’t go to sleep unless I’m reading at least a few pages – no matter when I actually go to bed. (I’m a night owl – another sin.) The current book on my pillow is Mary Balogh’s The Arrangement, one of her “Survivors’ Club” books.

    Reply
  84. Nicola – I’ve never been one for listening to books read on audio. Or to audible readings of books in general. The only exception is when I “attend” readings of books during the “Literary Society” events within the covers of Anne Gracie’s “Chance Sisters” series. As to bedtime reading – the habit bit me when I was 10 years old and shows no signs of subsiding. Reading is one of my besetting sins. I can’t go anywhere without a book. And I can’t go to sleep unless I’m reading at least a few pages – no matter when I actually go to bed. (I’m a night owl – another sin.) The current book on my pillow is Mary Balogh’s The Arrangement, one of her “Survivors’ Club” books.

    Reply
  85. Nicola – I’ve never been one for listening to books read on audio. Or to audible readings of books in general. The only exception is when I “attend” readings of books during the “Literary Society” events within the covers of Anne Gracie’s “Chance Sisters” series. As to bedtime reading – the habit bit me when I was 10 years old and shows no signs of subsiding. Reading is one of my besetting sins. I can’t go anywhere without a book. And I can’t go to sleep unless I’m reading at least a few pages – no matter when I actually go to bed. (I’m a night owl – another sin.) The current book on my pillow is Mary Balogh’s The Arrangement, one of her “Survivors’ Club” books.

    Reply
  86. I am not a fan of audio books….I want to see what it says not the way someone else says it.
    I have been reading for a long time and I have had many nights when I had to read until dawn, because I simply could not stop. Yes, the sign of a good book and a bad night of rest.
    In order to prevent that, I look at magazines before I sleep. They are easy to put down. Or I watch TV. And I choose things that I am certain will not make me stay awake. Old shows I have seen several times, or boring things. And everyone will be shocked to learn that late at night there are many things being broadcast which are very, very boring.
    Thanks for this lovely post. I have always been the one who read to me. And that is not necessarily a bad thing.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  87. I am not a fan of audio books….I want to see what it says not the way someone else says it.
    I have been reading for a long time and I have had many nights when I had to read until dawn, because I simply could not stop. Yes, the sign of a good book and a bad night of rest.
    In order to prevent that, I look at magazines before I sleep. They are easy to put down. Or I watch TV. And I choose things that I am certain will not make me stay awake. Old shows I have seen several times, or boring things. And everyone will be shocked to learn that late at night there are many things being broadcast which are very, very boring.
    Thanks for this lovely post. I have always been the one who read to me. And that is not necessarily a bad thing.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  88. I am not a fan of audio books….I want to see what it says not the way someone else says it.
    I have been reading for a long time and I have had many nights when I had to read until dawn, because I simply could not stop. Yes, the sign of a good book and a bad night of rest.
    In order to prevent that, I look at magazines before I sleep. They are easy to put down. Or I watch TV. And I choose things that I am certain will not make me stay awake. Old shows I have seen several times, or boring things. And everyone will be shocked to learn that late at night there are many things being broadcast which are very, very boring.
    Thanks for this lovely post. I have always been the one who read to me. And that is not necessarily a bad thing.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  89. I am not a fan of audio books….I want to see what it says not the way someone else says it.
    I have been reading for a long time and I have had many nights when I had to read until dawn, because I simply could not stop. Yes, the sign of a good book and a bad night of rest.
    In order to prevent that, I look at magazines before I sleep. They are easy to put down. Or I watch TV. And I choose things that I am certain will not make me stay awake. Old shows I have seen several times, or boring things. And everyone will be shocked to learn that late at night there are many things being broadcast which are very, very boring.
    Thanks for this lovely post. I have always been the one who read to me. And that is not necessarily a bad thing.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  90. I am not a fan of audio books….I want to see what it says not the way someone else says it.
    I have been reading for a long time and I have had many nights when I had to read until dawn, because I simply could not stop. Yes, the sign of a good book and a bad night of rest.
    In order to prevent that, I look at magazines before I sleep. They are easy to put down. Or I watch TV. And I choose things that I am certain will not make me stay awake. Old shows I have seen several times, or boring things. And everyone will be shocked to learn that late at night there are many things being broadcast which are very, very boring.
    Thanks for this lovely post. I have always been the one who read to me. And that is not necessarily a bad thing.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  91. I always read in bed before going to sleep. It is a habit I was only able to indulge in after I was widowed. I never was able to do so as a child. I never listened to a serial book on the radio as I never had a personal radio until I was out of college. When I was in the 5th grade, my teacher read us books for an hour on Wednesdays. In those days, students were released from school for the last two hours to go and receive religious instruction. It was mostly Jewish boys and Catholics who availed themselves of this but others also did before Easter. The teacher read regular library books. The only one I remember was one about a Sugar Creek gang– a group of children who were siblings and friends, I learned later that these were Christian-themed books. At the time I was just interested in the next chapter.

    Reply
  92. I always read in bed before going to sleep. It is a habit I was only able to indulge in after I was widowed. I never was able to do so as a child. I never listened to a serial book on the radio as I never had a personal radio until I was out of college. When I was in the 5th grade, my teacher read us books for an hour on Wednesdays. In those days, students were released from school for the last two hours to go and receive religious instruction. It was mostly Jewish boys and Catholics who availed themselves of this but others also did before Easter. The teacher read regular library books. The only one I remember was one about a Sugar Creek gang– a group of children who were siblings and friends, I learned later that these were Christian-themed books. At the time I was just interested in the next chapter.

    Reply
  93. I always read in bed before going to sleep. It is a habit I was only able to indulge in after I was widowed. I never was able to do so as a child. I never listened to a serial book on the radio as I never had a personal radio until I was out of college. When I was in the 5th grade, my teacher read us books for an hour on Wednesdays. In those days, students were released from school for the last two hours to go and receive religious instruction. It was mostly Jewish boys and Catholics who availed themselves of this but others also did before Easter. The teacher read regular library books. The only one I remember was one about a Sugar Creek gang– a group of children who were siblings and friends, I learned later that these were Christian-themed books. At the time I was just interested in the next chapter.

    Reply
  94. I always read in bed before going to sleep. It is a habit I was only able to indulge in after I was widowed. I never was able to do so as a child. I never listened to a serial book on the radio as I never had a personal radio until I was out of college. When I was in the 5th grade, my teacher read us books for an hour on Wednesdays. In those days, students were released from school for the last two hours to go and receive religious instruction. It was mostly Jewish boys and Catholics who availed themselves of this but others also did before Easter. The teacher read regular library books. The only one I remember was one about a Sugar Creek gang– a group of children who were siblings and friends, I learned later that these were Christian-themed books. At the time I was just interested in the next chapter.

    Reply
  95. I always read in bed before going to sleep. It is a habit I was only able to indulge in after I was widowed. I never was able to do so as a child. I never listened to a serial book on the radio as I never had a personal radio until I was out of college. When I was in the 5th grade, my teacher read us books for an hour on Wednesdays. In those days, students were released from school for the last two hours to go and receive religious instruction. It was mostly Jewish boys and Catholics who availed themselves of this but others also did before Easter. The teacher read regular library books. The only one I remember was one about a Sugar Creek gang– a group of children who were siblings and friends, I learned later that these were Christian-themed books. At the time I was just interested in the next chapter.

    Reply
  96. I missed out on a lot to do with reading as a child. I had no access to radio stories and no libraries of any description near where I lived. I only got to read books I borrowed from a friend and I’m a voracious reader. Probably why I have books everywhere in the house now.
    I read before bed, in bed and on Sunday mornings I have a lie in and read with a cuppa.
    I listen to audio books when I’m doing my house work. I only recently started audio books on the advice of friends on GoodReads.
    Great post Nicola.

    Reply
  97. I missed out on a lot to do with reading as a child. I had no access to radio stories and no libraries of any description near where I lived. I only got to read books I borrowed from a friend and I’m a voracious reader. Probably why I have books everywhere in the house now.
    I read before bed, in bed and on Sunday mornings I have a lie in and read with a cuppa.
    I listen to audio books when I’m doing my house work. I only recently started audio books on the advice of friends on GoodReads.
    Great post Nicola.

    Reply
  98. I missed out on a lot to do with reading as a child. I had no access to radio stories and no libraries of any description near where I lived. I only got to read books I borrowed from a friend and I’m a voracious reader. Probably why I have books everywhere in the house now.
    I read before bed, in bed and on Sunday mornings I have a lie in and read with a cuppa.
    I listen to audio books when I’m doing my house work. I only recently started audio books on the advice of friends on GoodReads.
    Great post Nicola.

    Reply
  99. I missed out on a lot to do with reading as a child. I had no access to radio stories and no libraries of any description near where I lived. I only got to read books I borrowed from a friend and I’m a voracious reader. Probably why I have books everywhere in the house now.
    I read before bed, in bed and on Sunday mornings I have a lie in and read with a cuppa.
    I listen to audio books when I’m doing my house work. I only recently started audio books on the advice of friends on GoodReads.
    Great post Nicola.

    Reply
  100. I missed out on a lot to do with reading as a child. I had no access to radio stories and no libraries of any description near where I lived. I only got to read books I borrowed from a friend and I’m a voracious reader. Probably why I have books everywhere in the house now.
    I read before bed, in bed and on Sunday mornings I have a lie in and read with a cuppa.
    I listen to audio books when I’m doing my house work. I only recently started audio books on the advice of friends on GoodReads.
    Great post Nicola.

    Reply
  101. I’ve had a broad range of reading/story adventures over the years. My mom read to us, told us stories (Ricki, tiki, tavi) and also made up stories for us.
    For some reason it wasn’t until 3rd grade that reading on my own clicked and then I became a voracious bookworm (still am for that matter!
    Ah…..The Bad Decisions Book Club….so THAT is what I belong to. I’ve just always assumed I belonged to the “Lets be stupid and start ANOTHER book at 1:00 am and get no sleep at all” group of one. ha ha ha… Kareni, thanks for giving us the proper name of the group we really belong to. Bad Decisions sounds much better than a Stupid Club.. Ahem.
    I do have to read something every night before going to bed. Depending on the events of the day I may fall out in 15 mins or stay up for 7 more hours. Once I hit my wall I can go to sleep regardless of what is going on. Fireworks, TV, etc.
    I love audio books but they have to be the right kind. No violence to speak of. No gore. Because I get so interested in them it becomes real. I don’t need that stuck in my brain. Which is why I also can’t read dark books or if they have a dark part they have to be much earlier in the day. Time for it to wash out. Otherwise, I give myself a disturbed night of rest.
    Generally the only time I read in bed is if I wake up and can’t go back to sleep or I’ve gone to bed and suddenly gotten more awake than when I went to bed. I have a few already read favorites sitting there waiting to be read. I have to read while laying on my side or I’ll wake up and be a participating club member. Grin.
    I had a few elementary school teachers who read to us which was always lovely. When my sisters and I took over washing/drying the dishes my mom would read to us as a way to keep us going and not arguing.
    As Constance said, reading a magazine will put me to sleep in no time. Which is odd when you think about. Why will an interesting magazine do me in but a so so book keep me up.

    Reply
  102. I’ve had a broad range of reading/story adventures over the years. My mom read to us, told us stories (Ricki, tiki, tavi) and also made up stories for us.
    For some reason it wasn’t until 3rd grade that reading on my own clicked and then I became a voracious bookworm (still am for that matter!
    Ah…..The Bad Decisions Book Club….so THAT is what I belong to. I’ve just always assumed I belonged to the “Lets be stupid and start ANOTHER book at 1:00 am and get no sleep at all” group of one. ha ha ha… Kareni, thanks for giving us the proper name of the group we really belong to. Bad Decisions sounds much better than a Stupid Club.. Ahem.
    I do have to read something every night before going to bed. Depending on the events of the day I may fall out in 15 mins or stay up for 7 more hours. Once I hit my wall I can go to sleep regardless of what is going on. Fireworks, TV, etc.
    I love audio books but they have to be the right kind. No violence to speak of. No gore. Because I get so interested in them it becomes real. I don’t need that stuck in my brain. Which is why I also can’t read dark books or if they have a dark part they have to be much earlier in the day. Time for it to wash out. Otherwise, I give myself a disturbed night of rest.
    Generally the only time I read in bed is if I wake up and can’t go back to sleep or I’ve gone to bed and suddenly gotten more awake than when I went to bed. I have a few already read favorites sitting there waiting to be read. I have to read while laying on my side or I’ll wake up and be a participating club member. Grin.
    I had a few elementary school teachers who read to us which was always lovely. When my sisters and I took over washing/drying the dishes my mom would read to us as a way to keep us going and not arguing.
    As Constance said, reading a magazine will put me to sleep in no time. Which is odd when you think about. Why will an interesting magazine do me in but a so so book keep me up.

    Reply
  103. I’ve had a broad range of reading/story adventures over the years. My mom read to us, told us stories (Ricki, tiki, tavi) and also made up stories for us.
    For some reason it wasn’t until 3rd grade that reading on my own clicked and then I became a voracious bookworm (still am for that matter!
    Ah…..The Bad Decisions Book Club….so THAT is what I belong to. I’ve just always assumed I belonged to the “Lets be stupid and start ANOTHER book at 1:00 am and get no sleep at all” group of one. ha ha ha… Kareni, thanks for giving us the proper name of the group we really belong to. Bad Decisions sounds much better than a Stupid Club.. Ahem.
    I do have to read something every night before going to bed. Depending on the events of the day I may fall out in 15 mins or stay up for 7 more hours. Once I hit my wall I can go to sleep regardless of what is going on. Fireworks, TV, etc.
    I love audio books but they have to be the right kind. No violence to speak of. No gore. Because I get so interested in them it becomes real. I don’t need that stuck in my brain. Which is why I also can’t read dark books or if they have a dark part they have to be much earlier in the day. Time for it to wash out. Otherwise, I give myself a disturbed night of rest.
    Generally the only time I read in bed is if I wake up and can’t go back to sleep or I’ve gone to bed and suddenly gotten more awake than when I went to bed. I have a few already read favorites sitting there waiting to be read. I have to read while laying on my side or I’ll wake up and be a participating club member. Grin.
    I had a few elementary school teachers who read to us which was always lovely. When my sisters and I took over washing/drying the dishes my mom would read to us as a way to keep us going and not arguing.
    As Constance said, reading a magazine will put me to sleep in no time. Which is odd when you think about. Why will an interesting magazine do me in but a so so book keep me up.

    Reply
  104. I’ve had a broad range of reading/story adventures over the years. My mom read to us, told us stories (Ricki, tiki, tavi) and also made up stories for us.
    For some reason it wasn’t until 3rd grade that reading on my own clicked and then I became a voracious bookworm (still am for that matter!
    Ah…..The Bad Decisions Book Club….so THAT is what I belong to. I’ve just always assumed I belonged to the “Lets be stupid and start ANOTHER book at 1:00 am and get no sleep at all” group of one. ha ha ha… Kareni, thanks for giving us the proper name of the group we really belong to. Bad Decisions sounds much better than a Stupid Club.. Ahem.
    I do have to read something every night before going to bed. Depending on the events of the day I may fall out in 15 mins or stay up for 7 more hours. Once I hit my wall I can go to sleep regardless of what is going on. Fireworks, TV, etc.
    I love audio books but they have to be the right kind. No violence to speak of. No gore. Because I get so interested in them it becomes real. I don’t need that stuck in my brain. Which is why I also can’t read dark books or if they have a dark part they have to be much earlier in the day. Time for it to wash out. Otherwise, I give myself a disturbed night of rest.
    Generally the only time I read in bed is if I wake up and can’t go back to sleep or I’ve gone to bed and suddenly gotten more awake than when I went to bed. I have a few already read favorites sitting there waiting to be read. I have to read while laying on my side or I’ll wake up and be a participating club member. Grin.
    I had a few elementary school teachers who read to us which was always lovely. When my sisters and I took over washing/drying the dishes my mom would read to us as a way to keep us going and not arguing.
    As Constance said, reading a magazine will put me to sleep in no time. Which is odd when you think about. Why will an interesting magazine do me in but a so so book keep me up.

    Reply
  105. I’ve had a broad range of reading/story adventures over the years. My mom read to us, told us stories (Ricki, tiki, tavi) and also made up stories for us.
    For some reason it wasn’t until 3rd grade that reading on my own clicked and then I became a voracious bookworm (still am for that matter!
    Ah…..The Bad Decisions Book Club….so THAT is what I belong to. I’ve just always assumed I belonged to the “Lets be stupid and start ANOTHER book at 1:00 am and get no sleep at all” group of one. ha ha ha… Kareni, thanks for giving us the proper name of the group we really belong to. Bad Decisions sounds much better than a Stupid Club.. Ahem.
    I do have to read something every night before going to bed. Depending on the events of the day I may fall out in 15 mins or stay up for 7 more hours. Once I hit my wall I can go to sleep regardless of what is going on. Fireworks, TV, etc.
    I love audio books but they have to be the right kind. No violence to speak of. No gore. Because I get so interested in them it becomes real. I don’t need that stuck in my brain. Which is why I also can’t read dark books or if they have a dark part they have to be much earlier in the day. Time for it to wash out. Otherwise, I give myself a disturbed night of rest.
    Generally the only time I read in bed is if I wake up and can’t go back to sleep or I’ve gone to bed and suddenly gotten more awake than when I went to bed. I have a few already read favorites sitting there waiting to be read. I have to read while laying on my side or I’ll wake up and be a participating club member. Grin.
    I had a few elementary school teachers who read to us which was always lovely. When my sisters and I took over washing/drying the dishes my mom would read to us as a way to keep us going and not arguing.
    As Constance said, reading a magazine will put me to sleep in no time. Which is odd when you think about. Why will an interesting magazine do me in but a so so book keep me up.

    Reply
  106. I used to read before bed, but not much anymore. I either start to fall asleep and have to read it all over again or I want to keep on past lights out. Now I listen to classsical or relaxing celtic/harp music. Much nicer!

    Reply
  107. I used to read before bed, but not much anymore. I either start to fall asleep and have to read it all over again or I want to keep on past lights out. Now I listen to classsical or relaxing celtic/harp music. Much nicer!

    Reply
  108. I used to read before bed, but not much anymore. I either start to fall asleep and have to read it all over again or I want to keep on past lights out. Now I listen to classsical or relaxing celtic/harp music. Much nicer!

    Reply
  109. I used to read before bed, but not much anymore. I either start to fall asleep and have to read it all over again or I want to keep on past lights out. Now I listen to classsical or relaxing celtic/harp music. Much nicer!

    Reply
  110. I used to read before bed, but not much anymore. I either start to fall asleep and have to read it all over again or I want to keep on past lights out. Now I listen to classsical or relaxing celtic/harp music. Much nicer!

    Reply
  111. Wow, how interesting, Constance! Thanks for sharing your experience of recording books, it was fascinating to read. I can imagine the difficulty of fitting some sections of books into 1 hour slots. And how great that you chose books with humour and a HEA!

    Reply
  112. Wow, how interesting, Constance! Thanks for sharing your experience of recording books, it was fascinating to read. I can imagine the difficulty of fitting some sections of books into 1 hour slots. And how great that you chose books with humour and a HEA!

    Reply
  113. Wow, how interesting, Constance! Thanks for sharing your experience of recording books, it was fascinating to read. I can imagine the difficulty of fitting some sections of books into 1 hour slots. And how great that you chose books with humour and a HEA!

    Reply
  114. Wow, how interesting, Constance! Thanks for sharing your experience of recording books, it was fascinating to read. I can imagine the difficulty of fitting some sections of books into 1 hour slots. And how great that you chose books with humour and a HEA!

    Reply
  115. Wow, how interesting, Constance! Thanks for sharing your experience of recording books, it was fascinating to read. I can imagine the difficulty of fitting some sections of books into 1 hour slots. And how great that you chose books with humour and a HEA!

    Reply
  116. Hi Karin, yes there’s nothing wrong in reading late into the night if you can catch up on your sleep the next day! In fact it sounds rather fun!

    Reply
  117. Hi Karin, yes there’s nothing wrong in reading late into the night if you can catch up on your sleep the next day! In fact it sounds rather fun!

    Reply
  118. Hi Karin, yes there’s nothing wrong in reading late into the night if you can catch up on your sleep the next day! In fact it sounds rather fun!

    Reply
  119. Hi Karin, yes there’s nothing wrong in reading late into the night if you can catch up on your sleep the next day! In fact it sounds rather fun!

    Reply
  120. Hi Karin, yes there’s nothing wrong in reading late into the night if you can catch up on your sleep the next day! In fact it sounds rather fun!

    Reply
  121. How fun that you are keeping going a tradition of bedtime reading that started when you were 10, Binnie! I’m with you on taking books everywhere – it doesn’t feel right to be without them!

    Reply
  122. How fun that you are keeping going a tradition of bedtime reading that started when you were 10, Binnie! I’m with you on taking books everywhere – it doesn’t feel right to be without them!

    Reply
  123. How fun that you are keeping going a tradition of bedtime reading that started when you were 10, Binnie! I’m with you on taking books everywhere – it doesn’t feel right to be without them!

    Reply
  124. How fun that you are keeping going a tradition of bedtime reading that started when you were 10, Binnie! I’m with you on taking books everywhere – it doesn’t feel right to be without them!

    Reply
  125. How fun that you are keeping going a tradition of bedtime reading that started when you were 10, Binnie! I’m with you on taking books everywhere – it doesn’t feel right to be without them!

    Reply
  126. Haha! I would never have guessed there were so many boring shows late at night… It’s interesting how many of us can’t read anything too exciting before we try to sleep. We all evidently have very vivid imaginations (which is what I would expect!)

    Reply
  127. Haha! I would never have guessed there were so many boring shows late at night… It’s interesting how many of us can’t read anything too exciting before we try to sleep. We all evidently have very vivid imaginations (which is what I would expect!)

    Reply
  128. Haha! I would never have guessed there were so many boring shows late at night… It’s interesting how many of us can’t read anything too exciting before we try to sleep. We all evidently have very vivid imaginations (which is what I would expect!)

    Reply
  129. Haha! I would never have guessed there were so many boring shows late at night… It’s interesting how many of us can’t read anything too exciting before we try to sleep. We all evidently have very vivid imaginations (which is what I would expect!)

    Reply
  130. Haha! I would never have guessed there were so many boring shows late at night… It’s interesting how many of us can’t read anything too exciting before we try to sleep. We all evidently have very vivid imaginations (which is what I would expect!)

    Reply
  131. I was interested to hear that your teacher read library books to class, Nancy. Now I’m trying to remember whether we had storytelling at school. I know we did when I was very small but I don’t remember it later.

    Reply
  132. I was interested to hear that your teacher read library books to class, Nancy. Now I’m trying to remember whether we had storytelling at school. I know we did when I was very small but I don’t remember it later.

    Reply
  133. I was interested to hear that your teacher read library books to class, Nancy. Now I’m trying to remember whether we had storytelling at school. I know we did when I was very small but I don’t remember it later.

    Reply
  134. I was interested to hear that your teacher read library books to class, Nancy. Now I’m trying to remember whether we had storytelling at school. I know we did when I was very small but I don’t remember it later.

    Reply
  135. I was interested to hear that your teacher read library books to class, Nancy. Now I’m trying to remember whether we had storytelling at school. I know we did when I was very small but I don’t remember it later.

    Reply
  136. Thanks, Teresa! I think it’s lovely that you can surround yourself with books now after being deprived when you were young. You’re definitely making the most of it!

    Reply
  137. Thanks, Teresa! I think it’s lovely that you can surround yourself with books now after being deprived when you were young. You’re definitely making the most of it!

    Reply
  138. Thanks, Teresa! I think it’s lovely that you can surround yourself with books now after being deprived when you were young. You’re definitely making the most of it!

    Reply
  139. Thanks, Teresa! I think it’s lovely that you can surround yourself with books now after being deprived when you were young. You’re definitely making the most of it!

    Reply
  140. Thanks, Teresa! I think it’s lovely that you can surround yourself with books now after being deprived when you were young. You’re definitely making the most of it!

    Reply
  141. Yes, the problem of falling asleep and having to re-listen could keep you going for weeks, Jeanne! The Celtic/harp music sound wonderfully restful.

    Reply
  142. Yes, the problem of falling asleep and having to re-listen could keep you going for weeks, Jeanne! The Celtic/harp music sound wonderfully restful.

    Reply
  143. Yes, the problem of falling asleep and having to re-listen could keep you going for weeks, Jeanne! The Celtic/harp music sound wonderfully restful.

    Reply
  144. Yes, the problem of falling asleep and having to re-listen could keep you going for weeks, Jeanne! The Celtic/harp music sound wonderfully restful.

    Reply
  145. Yes, the problem of falling asleep and having to re-listen could keep you going for weeks, Jeanne! The Celtic/harp music sound wonderfully restful.

    Reply
  146. Vicki, I love the idea of your mom reading to you and your sisters as a way to stop you arguing! Clearly a wise woman!
    I think this is the problem with most readers’ vivid imaginations, isn’t it. The book becomes so real to us we can’t just switch off and go to sleep when we stop reading or listening. I also need time and space for a story to fade before I try sleeping.

    Reply
  147. Vicki, I love the idea of your mom reading to you and your sisters as a way to stop you arguing! Clearly a wise woman!
    I think this is the problem with most readers’ vivid imaginations, isn’t it. The book becomes so real to us we can’t just switch off and go to sleep when we stop reading or listening. I also need time and space for a story to fade before I try sleeping.

    Reply
  148. Vicki, I love the idea of your mom reading to you and your sisters as a way to stop you arguing! Clearly a wise woman!
    I think this is the problem with most readers’ vivid imaginations, isn’t it. The book becomes so real to us we can’t just switch off and go to sleep when we stop reading or listening. I also need time and space for a story to fade before I try sleeping.

    Reply
  149. Vicki, I love the idea of your mom reading to you and your sisters as a way to stop you arguing! Clearly a wise woman!
    I think this is the problem with most readers’ vivid imaginations, isn’t it. The book becomes so real to us we can’t just switch off and go to sleep when we stop reading or listening. I also need time and space for a story to fade before I try sleeping.

    Reply
  150. Vicki, I love the idea of your mom reading to you and your sisters as a way to stop you arguing! Clearly a wise woman!
    I think this is the problem with most readers’ vivid imaginations, isn’t it. The book becomes so real to us we can’t just switch off and go to sleep when we stop reading or listening. I also need time and space for a story to fade before I try sleeping.

    Reply

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