2nd Annual Beach Blog

      Beach_barbie  From Loretta:
As you may have noticed, we Wenches have been juggling schedules, accommodating vacations and desperations (like deadline & moving & busted computers).  Both vacation and desperation (deadline) explain why I am here today and not last week, when I should have been.

Last year about this time, I did a blog on beach books.

LobsterIt’s going to be an annual event, I’ve decided.  The circumstances prevailing last August are in effect once again and will probably prevail forever and ever or at least until my publisher changes my deadline.  In other words, I’ve got a book due in about a month and a half, and that circumstance does not bode well for creative thinking in other areas of my life:  e.g., preparing meals (can you say “ham sandwich"?); dress (yes, a tank top and thin, brightly colored skirt from India exactly like the ones I wore in my hippie days will do fine today and until summer’s end); and blogging.
       King_geo_iii_bathing In time, you can expect blogs filled with the various artifacts uncovered in my research, pictures of ancient tomes I’ve acquired and actually read in my determination to make you, the reader, feel exactly as though you were in such and such a place at such and such a time–but with the place (rather like the people) smelling better and looking cleaner than it would have done in, say 1820.

Cape_cod_nasa Today, though, it’s pure fun:  Vacation and reading.  The perfect combination.
I’ve begun amassing the books that will go with me to Cape Cod, to be read on the beach or indoors, depending on the weather.  This has been a stormy summer in my part of the world, so I am expecting not much sun.

Crab My beach collection includes books by authors I discovered well into their careers.  The good news is that leaves me lots of their books to read.  The bad news is, getting hold of some of these books can be challenging.

Though I’ll probably take a few romances along, my favorite vacation reading is a good murder. 

PoseidonMysteries offer many mini-vacations to different times and places–and as far as ex-US goes, a greater variety of times and places than seems to be available in romance.Venice_trav

My beach bag will include selections from:
       Lindsey Davis’s Marcus Didius Falco series, set in the Rome of Vespasian.
       Donna Leon’s Commissario Brunetti series, set in present-day Venice.
       Margaret Maron’s Deborah Knott series, set in present-day North Carolina.
       Anne Perry’s Inspector Monk series–England, Victorian period.
Ocean_city_njJanet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum (12 & 13)–New Jersey, now.

Alexander McCall Smith–from the Ladies No 1 Detective Agency, set in Botswana.

Chinatown_2  Victoria Thompson’s Gaslight Series–Gilded Age NYC–featuring midwife Sarah Brandt.

Catskills In the non-murder category, I’m also packing a couple of Susan Wiggs’s Lakeshore Chronicles(actual signed copies from her visit to the New England Romance Writers annual conference last spring).

       Charing_cross_hotelYes, it’s a little heavy on the murder side but I’m hoping to amend that before departure day.  Last year, readers turned me on to Louise Rennison’s Georgia Nicolson (hilarious!) among others.

My beach reads probably don’t look anything like yours–or maybe there’s some overlap.  I’m hoping that once again this year some of you will point me (and your fellow readers) toward new and different forms of reading fun, for the beach or elsewhere.
      

LighthouseSo let’s do it again the way we did last summer:

What about you?  How do you choose your vacation reading?  What’s your idea of the perfect beach read?  If you were packing up for a weeklong, or better, two-weeklong getaway (and didn’t have to worry about weight allowances), what books would you take with you?

210 thoughts on “2nd Annual Beach Blog”

  1. I wonder, do you yearn to write murder mysteries, or do you like to read them because they’re the sort of thing you’d never write?
    For my holidays I always plan to read new books by reliable authors I’ve read before. Then I find better things to do and don’t read a thing!

    Reply
  2. I wonder, do you yearn to write murder mysteries, or do you like to read them because they’re the sort of thing you’d never write?
    For my holidays I always plan to read new books by reliable authors I’ve read before. Then I find better things to do and don’t read a thing!

    Reply
  3. I wonder, do you yearn to write murder mysteries, or do you like to read them because they’re the sort of thing you’d never write?
    For my holidays I always plan to read new books by reliable authors I’ve read before. Then I find better things to do and don’t read a thing!

    Reply
  4. I wonder, do you yearn to write murder mysteries, or do you like to read them because they’re the sort of thing you’d never write?
    For my holidays I always plan to read new books by reliable authors I’ve read before. Then I find better things to do and don’t read a thing!

    Reply
  5. I wonder, do you yearn to write murder mysteries, or do you like to read them because they’re the sort of thing you’d never write?
    For my holidays I always plan to read new books by reliable authors I’ve read before. Then I find better things to do and don’t read a thing!

    Reply
  6. It’s funny that the first author on your list is one I’ve been reading all summer – Lindsey Davis – it’s hard to go wrong with a good Falco. Anne Perry I discovered I cannot read – not after learning about her. For some reason, I cannot go there. Who else? Terry Pratchett! Lois McMaster Bujold.
    Last summer my reading was all Phillipa Gregory.

    Reply
  7. It’s funny that the first author on your list is one I’ve been reading all summer – Lindsey Davis – it’s hard to go wrong with a good Falco. Anne Perry I discovered I cannot read – not after learning about her. For some reason, I cannot go there. Who else? Terry Pratchett! Lois McMaster Bujold.
    Last summer my reading was all Phillipa Gregory.

    Reply
  8. It’s funny that the first author on your list is one I’ve been reading all summer – Lindsey Davis – it’s hard to go wrong with a good Falco. Anne Perry I discovered I cannot read – not after learning about her. For some reason, I cannot go there. Who else? Terry Pratchett! Lois McMaster Bujold.
    Last summer my reading was all Phillipa Gregory.

    Reply
  9. It’s funny that the first author on your list is one I’ve been reading all summer – Lindsey Davis – it’s hard to go wrong with a good Falco. Anne Perry I discovered I cannot read – not after learning about her. For some reason, I cannot go there. Who else? Terry Pratchett! Lois McMaster Bujold.
    Last summer my reading was all Phillipa Gregory.

    Reply
  10. It’s funny that the first author on your list is one I’ve been reading all summer – Lindsey Davis – it’s hard to go wrong with a good Falco. Anne Perry I discovered I cannot read – not after learning about her. For some reason, I cannot go there. Who else? Terry Pratchett! Lois McMaster Bujold.
    Last summer my reading was all Phillipa Gregory.

    Reply
  11. Ilove historical romance books
    and the books i would take are,
    TO DANGEROUS TO DESIRE
    BY ALEXANDER BENEDICT
    SURRENDER TO ME-SOPHIE JORDAN
    THE SECRET WEDDING-JO BEVERLY
    THE BOOK OF SCANDAL-JULIA LONDON
    THE EDGE OF DESIRE-STEPHANIE
    LAURENS.All of these books sound
    like a great beach read to me.

    Reply
  12. Ilove historical romance books
    and the books i would take are,
    TO DANGEROUS TO DESIRE
    BY ALEXANDER BENEDICT
    SURRENDER TO ME-SOPHIE JORDAN
    THE SECRET WEDDING-JO BEVERLY
    THE BOOK OF SCANDAL-JULIA LONDON
    THE EDGE OF DESIRE-STEPHANIE
    LAURENS.All of these books sound
    like a great beach read to me.

    Reply
  13. Ilove historical romance books
    and the books i would take are,
    TO DANGEROUS TO DESIRE
    BY ALEXANDER BENEDICT
    SURRENDER TO ME-SOPHIE JORDAN
    THE SECRET WEDDING-JO BEVERLY
    THE BOOK OF SCANDAL-JULIA LONDON
    THE EDGE OF DESIRE-STEPHANIE
    LAURENS.All of these books sound
    like a great beach read to me.

    Reply
  14. Ilove historical romance books
    and the books i would take are,
    TO DANGEROUS TO DESIRE
    BY ALEXANDER BENEDICT
    SURRENDER TO ME-SOPHIE JORDAN
    THE SECRET WEDDING-JO BEVERLY
    THE BOOK OF SCANDAL-JULIA LONDON
    THE EDGE OF DESIRE-STEPHANIE
    LAURENS.All of these books sound
    like a great beach read to me.

    Reply
  15. Ilove historical romance books
    and the books i would take are,
    TO DANGEROUS TO DESIRE
    BY ALEXANDER BENEDICT
    SURRENDER TO ME-SOPHIE JORDAN
    THE SECRET WEDDING-JO BEVERLY
    THE BOOK OF SCANDAL-JULIA LONDON
    THE EDGE OF DESIRE-STEPHANIE
    LAURENS.All of these books sound
    like a great beach read to me.

    Reply
  16. Happy reading, Loretta!
    Margaret Maron is my favorite mystery writer. I have read the short stories, the eight Sigrid Harald books, and Last Lessons of Summer, but the Deborah Knott books are my favorite mystery series. Maron is a genius at characterization and at capturing Southern culture. I will be in the bookstore next week, eager to buy Death’s Half Acre, the 14th Deborah Knott book.

    Reply
  17. Happy reading, Loretta!
    Margaret Maron is my favorite mystery writer. I have read the short stories, the eight Sigrid Harald books, and Last Lessons of Summer, but the Deborah Knott books are my favorite mystery series. Maron is a genius at characterization and at capturing Southern culture. I will be in the bookstore next week, eager to buy Death’s Half Acre, the 14th Deborah Knott book.

    Reply
  18. Happy reading, Loretta!
    Margaret Maron is my favorite mystery writer. I have read the short stories, the eight Sigrid Harald books, and Last Lessons of Summer, but the Deborah Knott books are my favorite mystery series. Maron is a genius at characterization and at capturing Southern culture. I will be in the bookstore next week, eager to buy Death’s Half Acre, the 14th Deborah Knott book.

    Reply
  19. Happy reading, Loretta!
    Margaret Maron is my favorite mystery writer. I have read the short stories, the eight Sigrid Harald books, and Last Lessons of Summer, but the Deborah Knott books are my favorite mystery series. Maron is a genius at characterization and at capturing Southern culture. I will be in the bookstore next week, eager to buy Death’s Half Acre, the 14th Deborah Knott book.

    Reply
  20. Happy reading, Loretta!
    Margaret Maron is my favorite mystery writer. I have read the short stories, the eight Sigrid Harald books, and Last Lessons of Summer, but the Deborah Knott books are my favorite mystery series. Maron is a genius at characterization and at capturing Southern culture. I will be in the bookstore next week, eager to buy Death’s Half Acre, the 14th Deborah Knott book.

    Reply
  21. If you’re interested in mysteries, I’d also suggest the wonderful new series by Deanna Raybourn, the “Silent” series. So far there are two: “Silent in the Grave” and “Silent in the Sanctuary”. How can you not love a book that begins “To say I met Nicholas Brisbane over my husband’s dead body would not be entirely accurate. Edward was still twitching when we met.” The quote may not be entirely accurate as I don’t have the book in front of me, but you get the gist.
    I also love the Maisie Dobbs series by Jacqueline Winspear and P.B. Ryan’s Gilded Age series (now, sadly, ended).
    Since I got back from vacation late last night, I’ve done more reading in the past week than usual and have another recommendation: A. Capella’s “The Wedding Officer”. It’s a novel about a British officer charged with ensuring that the soldiers did not bring home inappropriate Italian war brides. At the center it’s a lovely romance as well as a war story and a paean to the glories of Italian cooking. First Loretta’s “Your Scandalous Ways” and now this — I’ve definitely got to save up for a trip to Italy.

    Reply
  22. If you’re interested in mysteries, I’d also suggest the wonderful new series by Deanna Raybourn, the “Silent” series. So far there are two: “Silent in the Grave” and “Silent in the Sanctuary”. How can you not love a book that begins “To say I met Nicholas Brisbane over my husband’s dead body would not be entirely accurate. Edward was still twitching when we met.” The quote may not be entirely accurate as I don’t have the book in front of me, but you get the gist.
    I also love the Maisie Dobbs series by Jacqueline Winspear and P.B. Ryan’s Gilded Age series (now, sadly, ended).
    Since I got back from vacation late last night, I’ve done more reading in the past week than usual and have another recommendation: A. Capella’s “The Wedding Officer”. It’s a novel about a British officer charged with ensuring that the soldiers did not bring home inappropriate Italian war brides. At the center it’s a lovely romance as well as a war story and a paean to the glories of Italian cooking. First Loretta’s “Your Scandalous Ways” and now this — I’ve definitely got to save up for a trip to Italy.

    Reply
  23. If you’re interested in mysteries, I’d also suggest the wonderful new series by Deanna Raybourn, the “Silent” series. So far there are two: “Silent in the Grave” and “Silent in the Sanctuary”. How can you not love a book that begins “To say I met Nicholas Brisbane over my husband’s dead body would not be entirely accurate. Edward was still twitching when we met.” The quote may not be entirely accurate as I don’t have the book in front of me, but you get the gist.
    I also love the Maisie Dobbs series by Jacqueline Winspear and P.B. Ryan’s Gilded Age series (now, sadly, ended).
    Since I got back from vacation late last night, I’ve done more reading in the past week than usual and have another recommendation: A. Capella’s “The Wedding Officer”. It’s a novel about a British officer charged with ensuring that the soldiers did not bring home inappropriate Italian war brides. At the center it’s a lovely romance as well as a war story and a paean to the glories of Italian cooking. First Loretta’s “Your Scandalous Ways” and now this — I’ve definitely got to save up for a trip to Italy.

    Reply
  24. If you’re interested in mysteries, I’d also suggest the wonderful new series by Deanna Raybourn, the “Silent” series. So far there are two: “Silent in the Grave” and “Silent in the Sanctuary”. How can you not love a book that begins “To say I met Nicholas Brisbane over my husband’s dead body would not be entirely accurate. Edward was still twitching when we met.” The quote may not be entirely accurate as I don’t have the book in front of me, but you get the gist.
    I also love the Maisie Dobbs series by Jacqueline Winspear and P.B. Ryan’s Gilded Age series (now, sadly, ended).
    Since I got back from vacation late last night, I’ve done more reading in the past week than usual and have another recommendation: A. Capella’s “The Wedding Officer”. It’s a novel about a British officer charged with ensuring that the soldiers did not bring home inappropriate Italian war brides. At the center it’s a lovely romance as well as a war story and a paean to the glories of Italian cooking. First Loretta’s “Your Scandalous Ways” and now this — I’ve definitely got to save up for a trip to Italy.

    Reply
  25. If you’re interested in mysteries, I’d also suggest the wonderful new series by Deanna Raybourn, the “Silent” series. So far there are two: “Silent in the Grave” and “Silent in the Sanctuary”. How can you not love a book that begins “To say I met Nicholas Brisbane over my husband’s dead body would not be entirely accurate. Edward was still twitching when we met.” The quote may not be entirely accurate as I don’t have the book in front of me, but you get the gist.
    I also love the Maisie Dobbs series by Jacqueline Winspear and P.B. Ryan’s Gilded Age series (now, sadly, ended).
    Since I got back from vacation late last night, I’ve done more reading in the past week than usual and have another recommendation: A. Capella’s “The Wedding Officer”. It’s a novel about a British officer charged with ensuring that the soldiers did not bring home inappropriate Italian war brides. At the center it’s a lovely romance as well as a war story and a paean to the glories of Italian cooking. First Loretta’s “Your Scandalous Ways” and now this — I’ve definitely got to save up for a trip to Italy.

    Reply
  26. Francois, I’ve always been a mystery fan. And yes, I do like to read books that are very different from what I’m writing, especially when I’m on vacation. When I read romance these days, it tends to be contemporary romance. I’m not sure how many other authors this happens to–and not sure why it happens–but when I read in my own subgenre, I read as a writer, not a reader.__ Maggie, it is hard to keep books rum-free–but I use BookMates to protect them from the sunscreen, sand, sea, and drunken orgies.___Good list, Peggy. I’m taking notes.___Piper, I do understand. Funny thing with me is, I don’t care for the other series, only the Monk books. And I’m not sure how long that will last, as they may be getting too grim for me. I lost PD James that way. I’m getting kinda squeamish in my old age. But Terry Pratchett? Oh, yes, indeed. He’s an inspiration. I have not yet tried Bujold or Gregory, so they’re possibilities.__Janga, I discovered Maron really late, via the last Sigrid Harald book. I totally agree about her characterization and the way she captures southern culture.

    Reply
  27. Francois, I’ve always been a mystery fan. And yes, I do like to read books that are very different from what I’m writing, especially when I’m on vacation. When I read romance these days, it tends to be contemporary romance. I’m not sure how many other authors this happens to–and not sure why it happens–but when I read in my own subgenre, I read as a writer, not a reader.__ Maggie, it is hard to keep books rum-free–but I use BookMates to protect them from the sunscreen, sand, sea, and drunken orgies.___Good list, Peggy. I’m taking notes.___Piper, I do understand. Funny thing with me is, I don’t care for the other series, only the Monk books. And I’m not sure how long that will last, as they may be getting too grim for me. I lost PD James that way. I’m getting kinda squeamish in my old age. But Terry Pratchett? Oh, yes, indeed. He’s an inspiration. I have not yet tried Bujold or Gregory, so they’re possibilities.__Janga, I discovered Maron really late, via the last Sigrid Harald book. I totally agree about her characterization and the way she captures southern culture.

    Reply
  28. Francois, I’ve always been a mystery fan. And yes, I do like to read books that are very different from what I’m writing, especially when I’m on vacation. When I read romance these days, it tends to be contemporary romance. I’m not sure how many other authors this happens to–and not sure why it happens–but when I read in my own subgenre, I read as a writer, not a reader.__ Maggie, it is hard to keep books rum-free–but I use BookMates to protect them from the sunscreen, sand, sea, and drunken orgies.___Good list, Peggy. I’m taking notes.___Piper, I do understand. Funny thing with me is, I don’t care for the other series, only the Monk books. And I’m not sure how long that will last, as they may be getting too grim for me. I lost PD James that way. I’m getting kinda squeamish in my old age. But Terry Pratchett? Oh, yes, indeed. He’s an inspiration. I have not yet tried Bujold or Gregory, so they’re possibilities.__Janga, I discovered Maron really late, via the last Sigrid Harald book. I totally agree about her characterization and the way she captures southern culture.

    Reply
  29. Francois, I’ve always been a mystery fan. And yes, I do like to read books that are very different from what I’m writing, especially when I’m on vacation. When I read romance these days, it tends to be contemporary romance. I’m not sure how many other authors this happens to–and not sure why it happens–but when I read in my own subgenre, I read as a writer, not a reader.__ Maggie, it is hard to keep books rum-free–but I use BookMates to protect them from the sunscreen, sand, sea, and drunken orgies.___Good list, Peggy. I’m taking notes.___Piper, I do understand. Funny thing with me is, I don’t care for the other series, only the Monk books. And I’m not sure how long that will last, as they may be getting too grim for me. I lost PD James that way. I’m getting kinda squeamish in my old age. But Terry Pratchett? Oh, yes, indeed. He’s an inspiration. I have not yet tried Bujold or Gregory, so they’re possibilities.__Janga, I discovered Maron really late, via the last Sigrid Harald book. I totally agree about her characterization and the way she captures southern culture.

    Reply
  30. Francois, I’ve always been a mystery fan. And yes, I do like to read books that are very different from what I’m writing, especially when I’m on vacation. When I read romance these days, it tends to be contemporary romance. I’m not sure how many other authors this happens to–and not sure why it happens–but when I read in my own subgenre, I read as a writer, not a reader.__ Maggie, it is hard to keep books rum-free–but I use BookMates to protect them from the sunscreen, sand, sea, and drunken orgies.___Good list, Peggy. I’m taking notes.___Piper, I do understand. Funny thing with me is, I don’t care for the other series, only the Monk books. And I’m not sure how long that will last, as they may be getting too grim for me. I lost PD James that way. I’m getting kinda squeamish in my old age. But Terry Pratchett? Oh, yes, indeed. He’s an inspiration. I have not yet tried Bujold or Gregory, so they’re possibilities.__Janga, I discovered Maron really late, via the last Sigrid Harald book. I totally agree about her characterization and the way she captures southern culture.

    Reply
  31. Too grim? Yes, I quit reading Elizabeth George when she simply couldn’t let any of her characters have a happy chapter. The last straw? Killing of Helen. That was over the top and the end of her for me.

    Reply
  32. Too grim? Yes, I quit reading Elizabeth George when she simply couldn’t let any of her characters have a happy chapter. The last straw? Killing of Helen. That was over the top and the end of her for me.

    Reply
  33. Too grim? Yes, I quit reading Elizabeth George when she simply couldn’t let any of her characters have a happy chapter. The last straw? Killing of Helen. That was over the top and the end of her for me.

    Reply
  34. Too grim? Yes, I quit reading Elizabeth George when she simply couldn’t let any of her characters have a happy chapter. The last straw? Killing of Helen. That was over the top and the end of her for me.

    Reply
  35. Too grim? Yes, I quit reading Elizabeth George when she simply couldn’t let any of her characters have a happy chapter. The last straw? Killing of Helen. That was over the top and the end of her for me.

    Reply
  36. From Sherrie:
    Lately I’ve been on a nonfiction kick. I’m halfway through Joe Navarro’s WHAT EVERY *BODY* IS SAYING. Navarro is retired from the FBI and is an expert in reading body language. His book is fascinating and highly informative. I’ve already put it to good use in a recent encounter where a person said one thing, but her body language said the exact opposite. (Did you know that the feet are the most reliable body language indicator, not the facial expression?)
    Because I’m a writer, I like books that deal with human behavior, so I’d include that in my list of beach reads. I’m also interested in biographies of historical figures and history. A lady in my critique group is writing a novel that takes place during the time Jesus was on the rise as a religious teacher, and her details about everyday life back then are fascinating.

    Reply
  37. From Sherrie:
    Lately I’ve been on a nonfiction kick. I’m halfway through Joe Navarro’s WHAT EVERY *BODY* IS SAYING. Navarro is retired from the FBI and is an expert in reading body language. His book is fascinating and highly informative. I’ve already put it to good use in a recent encounter where a person said one thing, but her body language said the exact opposite. (Did you know that the feet are the most reliable body language indicator, not the facial expression?)
    Because I’m a writer, I like books that deal with human behavior, so I’d include that in my list of beach reads. I’m also interested in biographies of historical figures and history. A lady in my critique group is writing a novel that takes place during the time Jesus was on the rise as a religious teacher, and her details about everyday life back then are fascinating.

    Reply
  38. From Sherrie:
    Lately I’ve been on a nonfiction kick. I’m halfway through Joe Navarro’s WHAT EVERY *BODY* IS SAYING. Navarro is retired from the FBI and is an expert in reading body language. His book is fascinating and highly informative. I’ve already put it to good use in a recent encounter where a person said one thing, but her body language said the exact opposite. (Did you know that the feet are the most reliable body language indicator, not the facial expression?)
    Because I’m a writer, I like books that deal with human behavior, so I’d include that in my list of beach reads. I’m also interested in biographies of historical figures and history. A lady in my critique group is writing a novel that takes place during the time Jesus was on the rise as a religious teacher, and her details about everyday life back then are fascinating.

    Reply
  39. From Sherrie:
    Lately I’ve been on a nonfiction kick. I’m halfway through Joe Navarro’s WHAT EVERY *BODY* IS SAYING. Navarro is retired from the FBI and is an expert in reading body language. His book is fascinating and highly informative. I’ve already put it to good use in a recent encounter where a person said one thing, but her body language said the exact opposite. (Did you know that the feet are the most reliable body language indicator, not the facial expression?)
    Because I’m a writer, I like books that deal with human behavior, so I’d include that in my list of beach reads. I’m also interested in biographies of historical figures and history. A lady in my critique group is writing a novel that takes place during the time Jesus was on the rise as a religious teacher, and her details about everyday life back then are fascinating.

    Reply
  40. From Sherrie:
    Lately I’ve been on a nonfiction kick. I’m halfway through Joe Navarro’s WHAT EVERY *BODY* IS SAYING. Navarro is retired from the FBI and is an expert in reading body language. His book is fascinating and highly informative. I’ve already put it to good use in a recent encounter where a person said one thing, but her body language said the exact opposite. (Did you know that the feet are the most reliable body language indicator, not the facial expression?)
    Because I’m a writer, I like books that deal with human behavior, so I’d include that in my list of beach reads. I’m also interested in biographies of historical figures and history. A lady in my critique group is writing a novel that takes place during the time Jesus was on the rise as a religious teacher, and her details about everyday life back then are fascinating.

    Reply
  41. Susan/DC, I definitely have to get the Deanna Raybourn, and The Wedding Officer sounds like exactly the sort of thing I’d enjoy. My bookstore list is getting longer–and this is tax-free weekend in MA. Perfect time for a trip to Waldenbooks.__Piper, I’ve had that reaction before, too. Murder isn’t pretty, but that doesn’t mean a book has to be relentlessly depressing. Not everyone needs to be funny and witty like Davis’s Falco, but I need a little light in the darkness.

    Reply
  42. Susan/DC, I definitely have to get the Deanna Raybourn, and The Wedding Officer sounds like exactly the sort of thing I’d enjoy. My bookstore list is getting longer–and this is tax-free weekend in MA. Perfect time for a trip to Waldenbooks.__Piper, I’ve had that reaction before, too. Murder isn’t pretty, but that doesn’t mean a book has to be relentlessly depressing. Not everyone needs to be funny and witty like Davis’s Falco, but I need a little light in the darkness.

    Reply
  43. Susan/DC, I definitely have to get the Deanna Raybourn, and The Wedding Officer sounds like exactly the sort of thing I’d enjoy. My bookstore list is getting longer–and this is tax-free weekend in MA. Perfect time for a trip to Waldenbooks.__Piper, I’ve had that reaction before, too. Murder isn’t pretty, but that doesn’t mean a book has to be relentlessly depressing. Not everyone needs to be funny and witty like Davis’s Falco, but I need a little light in the darkness.

    Reply
  44. Susan/DC, I definitely have to get the Deanna Raybourn, and The Wedding Officer sounds like exactly the sort of thing I’d enjoy. My bookstore list is getting longer–and this is tax-free weekend in MA. Perfect time for a trip to Waldenbooks.__Piper, I’ve had that reaction before, too. Murder isn’t pretty, but that doesn’t mean a book has to be relentlessly depressing. Not everyone needs to be funny and witty like Davis’s Falco, but I need a little light in the darkness.

    Reply
  45. Susan/DC, I definitely have to get the Deanna Raybourn, and The Wedding Officer sounds like exactly the sort of thing I’d enjoy. My bookstore list is getting longer–and this is tax-free weekend in MA. Perfect time for a trip to Waldenbooks.__Piper, I’ve had that reaction before, too. Murder isn’t pretty, but that doesn’t mean a book has to be relentlessly depressing. Not everyone needs to be funny and witty like Davis’s Falco, but I need a little light in the darkness.

    Reply
  46. I love Sharon Kay Penman’s mystery series set in the court of Eleanor of Aquitaine (THE QUEEN’S MAN, CRUEL AS THE GRAVE, etc.). I haven’t read the latest one yet (PRINCE OF DARKNESS) so that would be a must take. I’m big on Rita Mae Brown too (esp the Jane Arnold books that are set in the VA hunting scene). And I’m waaaaay behind on my friend’s books. Monica McCarty and Veronica Wolff’s books have been smoldering in my TBR pile since they came out. *guilty flush* And now I’ve added Pat’s Mystic books to the pile . . . I think I’ll haul some of them out to Burning Man with me.
    If you’re looking for something a little out there, Max Brooks’ WORLD WAR Z is one of the best books I’ve read this year (yes, I’m stating in public that book about the zombie apocalypse is a fantastic read and I’m REALLY not joking).

    Reply
  47. I love Sharon Kay Penman’s mystery series set in the court of Eleanor of Aquitaine (THE QUEEN’S MAN, CRUEL AS THE GRAVE, etc.). I haven’t read the latest one yet (PRINCE OF DARKNESS) so that would be a must take. I’m big on Rita Mae Brown too (esp the Jane Arnold books that are set in the VA hunting scene). And I’m waaaaay behind on my friend’s books. Monica McCarty and Veronica Wolff’s books have been smoldering in my TBR pile since they came out. *guilty flush* And now I’ve added Pat’s Mystic books to the pile . . . I think I’ll haul some of them out to Burning Man with me.
    If you’re looking for something a little out there, Max Brooks’ WORLD WAR Z is one of the best books I’ve read this year (yes, I’m stating in public that book about the zombie apocalypse is a fantastic read and I’m REALLY not joking).

    Reply
  48. I love Sharon Kay Penman’s mystery series set in the court of Eleanor of Aquitaine (THE QUEEN’S MAN, CRUEL AS THE GRAVE, etc.). I haven’t read the latest one yet (PRINCE OF DARKNESS) so that would be a must take. I’m big on Rita Mae Brown too (esp the Jane Arnold books that are set in the VA hunting scene). And I’m waaaaay behind on my friend’s books. Monica McCarty and Veronica Wolff’s books have been smoldering in my TBR pile since they came out. *guilty flush* And now I’ve added Pat’s Mystic books to the pile . . . I think I’ll haul some of them out to Burning Man with me.
    If you’re looking for something a little out there, Max Brooks’ WORLD WAR Z is one of the best books I’ve read this year (yes, I’m stating in public that book about the zombie apocalypse is a fantastic read and I’m REALLY not joking).

    Reply
  49. I love Sharon Kay Penman’s mystery series set in the court of Eleanor of Aquitaine (THE QUEEN’S MAN, CRUEL AS THE GRAVE, etc.). I haven’t read the latest one yet (PRINCE OF DARKNESS) so that would be a must take. I’m big on Rita Mae Brown too (esp the Jane Arnold books that are set in the VA hunting scene). And I’m waaaaay behind on my friend’s books. Monica McCarty and Veronica Wolff’s books have been smoldering in my TBR pile since they came out. *guilty flush* And now I’ve added Pat’s Mystic books to the pile . . . I think I’ll haul some of them out to Burning Man with me.
    If you’re looking for something a little out there, Max Brooks’ WORLD WAR Z is one of the best books I’ve read this year (yes, I’m stating in public that book about the zombie apocalypse is a fantastic read and I’m REALLY not joking).

    Reply
  50. I love Sharon Kay Penman’s mystery series set in the court of Eleanor of Aquitaine (THE QUEEN’S MAN, CRUEL AS THE GRAVE, etc.). I haven’t read the latest one yet (PRINCE OF DARKNESS) so that would be a must take. I’m big on Rita Mae Brown too (esp the Jane Arnold books that are set in the VA hunting scene). And I’m waaaaay behind on my friend’s books. Monica McCarty and Veronica Wolff’s books have been smoldering in my TBR pile since they came out. *guilty flush* And now I’ve added Pat’s Mystic books to the pile . . . I think I’ll haul some of them out to Burning Man with me.
    If you’re looking for something a little out there, Max Brooks’ WORLD WAR Z is one of the best books I’ve read this year (yes, I’m stating in public that book about the zombie apocalypse is a fantastic read and I’m REALLY not joking).

    Reply
  51. Susan/DC, how did I forget about Maisie Dobbs? And now I’m many books behind…but what else is new? ___Sherrie, you remind me how long it’s been since I’ve read one of those books about human behavior. I always learn things.__Kalen, I didn’t know about Sharon Kay Penman, but this, too, sounds like what I’d like. When historical mysteries are done well, they are just fabulous–what I meant by mini-vacation: Time travel plus a puzzle to solve. OK, not sure about zombies, but I will put it on my list. Never thought I’d enjoy a book about the plague, but I was deeply impressed–and moved–by Connie Willis’s Domesday Book.

    Reply
  52. Susan/DC, how did I forget about Maisie Dobbs? And now I’m many books behind…but what else is new? ___Sherrie, you remind me how long it’s been since I’ve read one of those books about human behavior. I always learn things.__Kalen, I didn’t know about Sharon Kay Penman, but this, too, sounds like what I’d like. When historical mysteries are done well, they are just fabulous–what I meant by mini-vacation: Time travel plus a puzzle to solve. OK, not sure about zombies, but I will put it on my list. Never thought I’d enjoy a book about the plague, but I was deeply impressed–and moved–by Connie Willis’s Domesday Book.

    Reply
  53. Susan/DC, how did I forget about Maisie Dobbs? And now I’m many books behind…but what else is new? ___Sherrie, you remind me how long it’s been since I’ve read one of those books about human behavior. I always learn things.__Kalen, I didn’t know about Sharon Kay Penman, but this, too, sounds like what I’d like. When historical mysteries are done well, they are just fabulous–what I meant by mini-vacation: Time travel plus a puzzle to solve. OK, not sure about zombies, but I will put it on my list. Never thought I’d enjoy a book about the plague, but I was deeply impressed–and moved–by Connie Willis’s Domesday Book.

    Reply
  54. Susan/DC, how did I forget about Maisie Dobbs? And now I’m many books behind…but what else is new? ___Sherrie, you remind me how long it’s been since I’ve read one of those books about human behavior. I always learn things.__Kalen, I didn’t know about Sharon Kay Penman, but this, too, sounds like what I’d like. When historical mysteries are done well, they are just fabulous–what I meant by mini-vacation: Time travel plus a puzzle to solve. OK, not sure about zombies, but I will put it on my list. Never thought I’d enjoy a book about the plague, but I was deeply impressed–and moved–by Connie Willis’s Domesday Book.

    Reply
  55. Susan/DC, how did I forget about Maisie Dobbs? And now I’m many books behind…but what else is new? ___Sherrie, you remind me how long it’s been since I’ve read one of those books about human behavior. I always learn things.__Kalen, I didn’t know about Sharon Kay Penman, but this, too, sounds like what I’d like. When historical mysteries are done well, they are just fabulous–what I meant by mini-vacation: Time travel plus a puzzle to solve. OK, not sure about zombies, but I will put it on my list. Never thought I’d enjoy a book about the plague, but I was deeply impressed–and moved–by Connie Willis’s Domesday Book.

    Reply
  56. Piper, I’m with you on the whole Anne Perry thing. I can’t read her either…
    Let’s see…I took 28 books on my vacation, most books I’d already read because I don’t have to worry about stopping at a great spot to turn over LOL
    What did I take:
    Our esteemed wenches
    Julia Quinn
    Anne Gracie (who I adore and she’s such a sweet person!)
    Candice Hern
    Of course, Immortal Highlander which goes everywhere with me, just because it’s so good
    Alexis Morgan
    Kathleen Woodiwiss
    and a few others that will *cough* remain nameless…

    Reply
  57. Piper, I’m with you on the whole Anne Perry thing. I can’t read her either…
    Let’s see…I took 28 books on my vacation, most books I’d already read because I don’t have to worry about stopping at a great spot to turn over LOL
    What did I take:
    Our esteemed wenches
    Julia Quinn
    Anne Gracie (who I adore and she’s such a sweet person!)
    Candice Hern
    Of course, Immortal Highlander which goes everywhere with me, just because it’s so good
    Alexis Morgan
    Kathleen Woodiwiss
    and a few others that will *cough* remain nameless…

    Reply
  58. Piper, I’m with you on the whole Anne Perry thing. I can’t read her either…
    Let’s see…I took 28 books on my vacation, most books I’d already read because I don’t have to worry about stopping at a great spot to turn over LOL
    What did I take:
    Our esteemed wenches
    Julia Quinn
    Anne Gracie (who I adore and she’s such a sweet person!)
    Candice Hern
    Of course, Immortal Highlander which goes everywhere with me, just because it’s so good
    Alexis Morgan
    Kathleen Woodiwiss
    and a few others that will *cough* remain nameless…

    Reply
  59. Piper, I’m with you on the whole Anne Perry thing. I can’t read her either…
    Let’s see…I took 28 books on my vacation, most books I’d already read because I don’t have to worry about stopping at a great spot to turn over LOL
    What did I take:
    Our esteemed wenches
    Julia Quinn
    Anne Gracie (who I adore and she’s such a sweet person!)
    Candice Hern
    Of course, Immortal Highlander which goes everywhere with me, just because it’s so good
    Alexis Morgan
    Kathleen Woodiwiss
    and a few others that will *cough* remain nameless…

    Reply
  60. Piper, I’m with you on the whole Anne Perry thing. I can’t read her either…
    Let’s see…I took 28 books on my vacation, most books I’d already read because I don’t have to worry about stopping at a great spot to turn over LOL
    What did I take:
    Our esteemed wenches
    Julia Quinn
    Anne Gracie (who I adore and she’s such a sweet person!)
    Candice Hern
    Of course, Immortal Highlander which goes everywhere with me, just because it’s so good
    Alexis Morgan
    Kathleen Woodiwiss
    and a few others that will *cough* remain nameless…

    Reply
  61. I’ve read some of the Anne Perry Inspector Monk mysteries,and I liked them. I also liked the Brother Cadfael mysteries. Again, they’re historical mysteries, because I like historicals.
    But the bulk of my reading remains romances.
    Just read: Unmasked by Nicola Cornick –great!!!
    Up next
    The Trouble with Moonlight by Donna MacMeans
    Some Like It Wicked–Teresa Medeiros
    No Place for a Lady–Louise Allen
    The Last Rake in London–Nicola Cornick again!!

    Reply
  62. I’ve read some of the Anne Perry Inspector Monk mysteries,and I liked them. I also liked the Brother Cadfael mysteries. Again, they’re historical mysteries, because I like historicals.
    But the bulk of my reading remains romances.
    Just read: Unmasked by Nicola Cornick –great!!!
    Up next
    The Trouble with Moonlight by Donna MacMeans
    Some Like It Wicked–Teresa Medeiros
    No Place for a Lady–Louise Allen
    The Last Rake in London–Nicola Cornick again!!

    Reply
  63. I’ve read some of the Anne Perry Inspector Monk mysteries,and I liked them. I also liked the Brother Cadfael mysteries. Again, they’re historical mysteries, because I like historicals.
    But the bulk of my reading remains romances.
    Just read: Unmasked by Nicola Cornick –great!!!
    Up next
    The Trouble with Moonlight by Donna MacMeans
    Some Like It Wicked–Teresa Medeiros
    No Place for a Lady–Louise Allen
    The Last Rake in London–Nicola Cornick again!!

    Reply
  64. I’ve read some of the Anne Perry Inspector Monk mysteries,and I liked them. I also liked the Brother Cadfael mysteries. Again, they’re historical mysteries, because I like historicals.
    But the bulk of my reading remains romances.
    Just read: Unmasked by Nicola Cornick –great!!!
    Up next
    The Trouble with Moonlight by Donna MacMeans
    Some Like It Wicked–Teresa Medeiros
    No Place for a Lady–Louise Allen
    The Last Rake in London–Nicola Cornick again!!

    Reply
  65. I’ve read some of the Anne Perry Inspector Monk mysteries,and I liked them. I also liked the Brother Cadfael mysteries. Again, they’re historical mysteries, because I like historicals.
    But the bulk of my reading remains romances.
    Just read: Unmasked by Nicola Cornick –great!!!
    Up next
    The Trouble with Moonlight by Donna MacMeans
    Some Like It Wicked–Teresa Medeiros
    No Place for a Lady–Louise Allen
    The Last Rake in London–Nicola Cornick again!!

    Reply
  66. My favorite mystery writers still available (I’m now rereading Elizabeth Linington under her various pseudonyms) are Jonathan Kellerman, Jeffery Deaver, Sarah Rayne (new discovery), Robert K. Tanenbaum, Minette Walters, and Carol O’Connell.
    My favorite historical mysteries (or, What to Read After You’ve Finished All of Brother Cadfael):
    Lynda S. Robinson’s series about Lord Meren, Eyes and Ears of Pharaoh (sort of combination head of the CIA and the FBI) to the young Tutenkhamen. (Much better, IMO, than her historical romances as Suzanne Robinson)
    Steven Saylor’s series set about Roman private eye Gordianus the Finder, set in the last days of the Roman Republic. I recommend starting with THE HOUSE OF THE VESTALS, a collection of short stories that includes his earliest adventures.

    Reply
  67. My favorite mystery writers still available (I’m now rereading Elizabeth Linington under her various pseudonyms) are Jonathan Kellerman, Jeffery Deaver, Sarah Rayne (new discovery), Robert K. Tanenbaum, Minette Walters, and Carol O’Connell.
    My favorite historical mysteries (or, What to Read After You’ve Finished All of Brother Cadfael):
    Lynda S. Robinson’s series about Lord Meren, Eyes and Ears of Pharaoh (sort of combination head of the CIA and the FBI) to the young Tutenkhamen. (Much better, IMO, than her historical romances as Suzanne Robinson)
    Steven Saylor’s series set about Roman private eye Gordianus the Finder, set in the last days of the Roman Republic. I recommend starting with THE HOUSE OF THE VESTALS, a collection of short stories that includes his earliest adventures.

    Reply
  68. My favorite mystery writers still available (I’m now rereading Elizabeth Linington under her various pseudonyms) are Jonathan Kellerman, Jeffery Deaver, Sarah Rayne (new discovery), Robert K. Tanenbaum, Minette Walters, and Carol O’Connell.
    My favorite historical mysteries (or, What to Read After You’ve Finished All of Brother Cadfael):
    Lynda S. Robinson’s series about Lord Meren, Eyes and Ears of Pharaoh (sort of combination head of the CIA and the FBI) to the young Tutenkhamen. (Much better, IMO, than her historical romances as Suzanne Robinson)
    Steven Saylor’s series set about Roman private eye Gordianus the Finder, set in the last days of the Roman Republic. I recommend starting with THE HOUSE OF THE VESTALS, a collection of short stories that includes his earliest adventures.

    Reply
  69. My favorite mystery writers still available (I’m now rereading Elizabeth Linington under her various pseudonyms) are Jonathan Kellerman, Jeffery Deaver, Sarah Rayne (new discovery), Robert K. Tanenbaum, Minette Walters, and Carol O’Connell.
    My favorite historical mysteries (or, What to Read After You’ve Finished All of Brother Cadfael):
    Lynda S. Robinson’s series about Lord Meren, Eyes and Ears of Pharaoh (sort of combination head of the CIA and the FBI) to the young Tutenkhamen. (Much better, IMO, than her historical romances as Suzanne Robinson)
    Steven Saylor’s series set about Roman private eye Gordianus the Finder, set in the last days of the Roman Republic. I recommend starting with THE HOUSE OF THE VESTALS, a collection of short stories that includes his earliest adventures.

    Reply
  70. My favorite mystery writers still available (I’m now rereading Elizabeth Linington under her various pseudonyms) are Jonathan Kellerman, Jeffery Deaver, Sarah Rayne (new discovery), Robert K. Tanenbaum, Minette Walters, and Carol O’Connell.
    My favorite historical mysteries (or, What to Read After You’ve Finished All of Brother Cadfael):
    Lynda S. Robinson’s series about Lord Meren, Eyes and Ears of Pharaoh (sort of combination head of the CIA and the FBI) to the young Tutenkhamen. (Much better, IMO, than her historical romances as Suzanne Robinson)
    Steven Saylor’s series set about Roman private eye Gordianus the Finder, set in the last days of the Roman Republic. I recommend starting with THE HOUSE OF THE VESTALS, a collection of short stories that includes his earliest adventures.

    Reply
  71. This is so not me. I burn to a crisp after half an hour in the sun. I only go to the beach to eat dinner or go wading at dawn or dusk. No such thing as a beach read for me because that’s the one place I never would read, what with the glare and the sand flies and all.
    However I gather the idea is to have some books about that are just for fun, nothing stupid but nothing that will tax the brain either. So I have some tales of the UFOs, Billie Piper’s autobiography, one of Jeremy Clarkson’s car books, and a stack of Harlequin Historicals about old ladies of 25 flouncing around Almack’s while they decide which of several impossibly rich & handsome dukes they will honor with their next dance and possibly their hearts (and the rest of their bodies as well, as these are Historicals after all).

    Reply
  72. This is so not me. I burn to a crisp after half an hour in the sun. I only go to the beach to eat dinner or go wading at dawn or dusk. No such thing as a beach read for me because that’s the one place I never would read, what with the glare and the sand flies and all.
    However I gather the idea is to have some books about that are just for fun, nothing stupid but nothing that will tax the brain either. So I have some tales of the UFOs, Billie Piper’s autobiography, one of Jeremy Clarkson’s car books, and a stack of Harlequin Historicals about old ladies of 25 flouncing around Almack’s while they decide which of several impossibly rich & handsome dukes they will honor with their next dance and possibly their hearts (and the rest of their bodies as well, as these are Historicals after all).

    Reply
  73. This is so not me. I burn to a crisp after half an hour in the sun. I only go to the beach to eat dinner or go wading at dawn or dusk. No such thing as a beach read for me because that’s the one place I never would read, what with the glare and the sand flies and all.
    However I gather the idea is to have some books about that are just for fun, nothing stupid but nothing that will tax the brain either. So I have some tales of the UFOs, Billie Piper’s autobiography, one of Jeremy Clarkson’s car books, and a stack of Harlequin Historicals about old ladies of 25 flouncing around Almack’s while they decide which of several impossibly rich & handsome dukes they will honor with their next dance and possibly their hearts (and the rest of their bodies as well, as these are Historicals after all).

    Reply
  74. This is so not me. I burn to a crisp after half an hour in the sun. I only go to the beach to eat dinner or go wading at dawn or dusk. No such thing as a beach read for me because that’s the one place I never would read, what with the glare and the sand flies and all.
    However I gather the idea is to have some books about that are just for fun, nothing stupid but nothing that will tax the brain either. So I have some tales of the UFOs, Billie Piper’s autobiography, one of Jeremy Clarkson’s car books, and a stack of Harlequin Historicals about old ladies of 25 flouncing around Almack’s while they decide which of several impossibly rich & handsome dukes they will honor with their next dance and possibly their hearts (and the rest of their bodies as well, as these are Historicals after all).

    Reply
  75. This is so not me. I burn to a crisp after half an hour in the sun. I only go to the beach to eat dinner or go wading at dawn or dusk. No such thing as a beach read for me because that’s the one place I never would read, what with the glare and the sand flies and all.
    However I gather the idea is to have some books about that are just for fun, nothing stupid but nothing that will tax the brain either. So I have some tales of the UFOs, Billie Piper’s autobiography, one of Jeremy Clarkson’s car books, and a stack of Harlequin Historicals about old ladies of 25 flouncing around Almack’s while they decide which of several impossibly rich & handsome dukes they will honor with their next dance and possibly their hearts (and the rest of their bodies as well, as these are Historicals after all).

    Reply
  76. There’s nothing like Marcus Didius Falco and his adventures starting with “The Silver Pig”.I’ve just discovered Rhys Bowen’s Molly Murphy mysteries…and herrecent “Her Royay Spyness” set in the 1930s. Excellent reads.
    Louis

    Reply
  77. There’s nothing like Marcus Didius Falco and his adventures starting with “The Silver Pig”.I’ve just discovered Rhys Bowen’s Molly Murphy mysteries…and herrecent “Her Royay Spyness” set in the 1930s. Excellent reads.
    Louis

    Reply
  78. There’s nothing like Marcus Didius Falco and his adventures starting with “The Silver Pig”.I’ve just discovered Rhys Bowen’s Molly Murphy mysteries…and herrecent “Her Royay Spyness” set in the 1930s. Excellent reads.
    Louis

    Reply
  79. There’s nothing like Marcus Didius Falco and his adventures starting with “The Silver Pig”.I’ve just discovered Rhys Bowen’s Molly Murphy mysteries…and herrecent “Her Royay Spyness” set in the 1930s. Excellent reads.
    Louis

    Reply
  80. There’s nothing like Marcus Didius Falco and his adventures starting with “The Silver Pig”.I’ve just discovered Rhys Bowen’s Molly Murphy mysteries…and herrecent “Her Royay Spyness” set in the 1930s. Excellent reads.
    Louis

    Reply
  81. Have you ever read Kate Ross? She wrote four mysteries (unfortunately she died ten years ago) set during the Regency with a Beau Brummell-like dandy called Julian Kestrel as the sleuth. You spend a lot of time in the slums of London, or maybe that’s what stuck in my memory. The last book, Devil in Music, is set in northern Italy and revolves around opera. I enjoyed all four of them.

    Reply
  82. Have you ever read Kate Ross? She wrote four mysteries (unfortunately she died ten years ago) set during the Regency with a Beau Brummell-like dandy called Julian Kestrel as the sleuth. You spend a lot of time in the slums of London, or maybe that’s what stuck in my memory. The last book, Devil in Music, is set in northern Italy and revolves around opera. I enjoyed all four of them.

    Reply
  83. Have you ever read Kate Ross? She wrote four mysteries (unfortunately she died ten years ago) set during the Regency with a Beau Brummell-like dandy called Julian Kestrel as the sleuth. You spend a lot of time in the slums of London, or maybe that’s what stuck in my memory. The last book, Devil in Music, is set in northern Italy and revolves around opera. I enjoyed all four of them.

    Reply
  84. Have you ever read Kate Ross? She wrote four mysteries (unfortunately she died ten years ago) set during the Regency with a Beau Brummell-like dandy called Julian Kestrel as the sleuth. You spend a lot of time in the slums of London, or maybe that’s what stuck in my memory. The last book, Devil in Music, is set in northern Italy and revolves around opera. I enjoyed all four of them.

    Reply
  85. Have you ever read Kate Ross? She wrote four mysteries (unfortunately she died ten years ago) set during the Regency with a Beau Brummell-like dandy called Julian Kestrel as the sleuth. You spend a lot of time in the slums of London, or maybe that’s what stuck in my memory. The last book, Devil in Music, is set in northern Italy and revolves around opera. I enjoyed all four of them.

    Reply
  86. Another historical mystery writer is Ashley Gardner. Her(?) protagonist is an ex army officer, down on his luck after Waterloo. Her first book was The Hanover Square Affair”. I also love Caroline Graham’s Inspector Barnaby books.

    Reply
  87. Another historical mystery writer is Ashley Gardner. Her(?) protagonist is an ex army officer, down on his luck after Waterloo. Her first book was The Hanover Square Affair”. I also love Caroline Graham’s Inspector Barnaby books.

    Reply
  88. Another historical mystery writer is Ashley Gardner. Her(?) protagonist is an ex army officer, down on his luck after Waterloo. Her first book was The Hanover Square Affair”. I also love Caroline Graham’s Inspector Barnaby books.

    Reply
  89. Another historical mystery writer is Ashley Gardner. Her(?) protagonist is an ex army officer, down on his luck after Waterloo. Her first book was The Hanover Square Affair”. I also love Caroline Graham’s Inspector Barnaby books.

    Reply
  90. Another historical mystery writer is Ashley Gardner. Her(?) protagonist is an ex army officer, down on his luck after Waterloo. Her first book was The Hanover Square Affair”. I also love Caroline Graham’s Inspector Barnaby books.

    Reply
  91. You know, I forgot one of my most favorite mysteries of all time!! And I took it this year. Shame on me!
    The Nine Tailors by Dorothy L Sayers. Probably the one mystery that for some reason, I couldn’t figure out right up to the end (which is why I usually read very few mysteries. I know who dunnit much too early and then shout at the characters “Don’t you see this?”)

    Reply
  92. You know, I forgot one of my most favorite mysteries of all time!! And I took it this year. Shame on me!
    The Nine Tailors by Dorothy L Sayers. Probably the one mystery that for some reason, I couldn’t figure out right up to the end (which is why I usually read very few mysteries. I know who dunnit much too early and then shout at the characters “Don’t you see this?”)

    Reply
  93. You know, I forgot one of my most favorite mysteries of all time!! And I took it this year. Shame on me!
    The Nine Tailors by Dorothy L Sayers. Probably the one mystery that for some reason, I couldn’t figure out right up to the end (which is why I usually read very few mysteries. I know who dunnit much too early and then shout at the characters “Don’t you see this?”)

    Reply
  94. You know, I forgot one of my most favorite mysteries of all time!! And I took it this year. Shame on me!
    The Nine Tailors by Dorothy L Sayers. Probably the one mystery that for some reason, I couldn’t figure out right up to the end (which is why I usually read very few mysteries. I know who dunnit much too early and then shout at the characters “Don’t you see this?”)

    Reply
  95. You know, I forgot one of my most favorite mysteries of all time!! And I took it this year. Shame on me!
    The Nine Tailors by Dorothy L Sayers. Probably the one mystery that for some reason, I couldn’t figure out right up to the end (which is why I usually read very few mysteries. I know who dunnit much too early and then shout at the characters “Don’t you see this?”)

    Reply
  96. Yes, Dorothy L. Sawyers is great. I’ve read all her Lord Peter stories.
    I’ve also read Kate Ross. I liked her books, although they were a little too gritty for my taste.
    As for “Hanover Square”, I liked the hero very much, but again, the book was a little too gritty for me. Hey, I read romance/mystery for a little fantasy. If I want real life, I can read a newspaper.

    Reply
  97. Yes, Dorothy L. Sawyers is great. I’ve read all her Lord Peter stories.
    I’ve also read Kate Ross. I liked her books, although they were a little too gritty for my taste.
    As for “Hanover Square”, I liked the hero very much, but again, the book was a little too gritty for me. Hey, I read romance/mystery for a little fantasy. If I want real life, I can read a newspaper.

    Reply
  98. Yes, Dorothy L. Sawyers is great. I’ve read all her Lord Peter stories.
    I’ve also read Kate Ross. I liked her books, although they were a little too gritty for my taste.
    As for “Hanover Square”, I liked the hero very much, but again, the book was a little too gritty for me. Hey, I read romance/mystery for a little fantasy. If I want real life, I can read a newspaper.

    Reply
  99. Yes, Dorothy L. Sawyers is great. I’ve read all her Lord Peter stories.
    I’ve also read Kate Ross. I liked her books, although they were a little too gritty for my taste.
    As for “Hanover Square”, I liked the hero very much, but again, the book was a little too gritty for me. Hey, I read romance/mystery for a little fantasy. If I want real life, I can read a newspaper.

    Reply
  100. Yes, Dorothy L. Sawyers is great. I’ve read all her Lord Peter stories.
    I’ve also read Kate Ross. I liked her books, although they were a little too gritty for my taste.
    As for “Hanover Square”, I liked the hero very much, but again, the book was a little too gritty for me. Hey, I read romance/mystery for a little fantasy. If I want real life, I can read a newspaper.

    Reply
  101. Tal, I was thinking about giving the Robinson books a try, what with my fascination with things Egyptian. And Saylor’s series also sounds like something I’d enjoy.___”This is so not me. I burn to a crisp after half an hour in the sun.” LOL, Janice. I, too, burn to a crisp. So I sit under an umbrella, wearing a hat, my skin thickly coated with #60 sunblock. Coverups usually get involved about an hour in. My polarized sunglasses take care of glare. At the Cape, sand flies tend to come out near dusk, at which time we’re heading away from beach and on to a lobster dinner, maybe. Yes, it’s quite a bit of hassle & I can understand why other sun-sensitive people would choose another type of vacation venue. But I love the smell and sound of the ocean, and I love to swim in it. I guess it satisfies some personal, primal need. Billie Piper’s autobiography? No kidding? That sounds perfect!___ Louis, I’m writing down Rhys Bowen, too. I have a weakness for Between-the-Wars settings. A current fave is Barbara Cleverley’s Joe Sandilands mysteries.___ Ingrid, I really liked Kate Ross. So sad that she died so young. __Priscilla, I’ve been reading Ashley Gardner. I agree with Linda that they can be a little grittier than I like, but as is the case with Anne Perry, setting and characters are compelling enough to keep me reading. But is Gardner still writing those mysteries? IIRC, there hasn’t been a new one for a couple of years.__Prisicilla, I am extremely fond of Inspector Barnaby–in the books and in the TV series. __Theo & Linda, Sayers is wonderful. Thank you for reminding me. She and Ngaio Marsh I can read over & over.

    Reply
  102. Tal, I was thinking about giving the Robinson books a try, what with my fascination with things Egyptian. And Saylor’s series also sounds like something I’d enjoy.___”This is so not me. I burn to a crisp after half an hour in the sun.” LOL, Janice. I, too, burn to a crisp. So I sit under an umbrella, wearing a hat, my skin thickly coated with #60 sunblock. Coverups usually get involved about an hour in. My polarized sunglasses take care of glare. At the Cape, sand flies tend to come out near dusk, at which time we’re heading away from beach and on to a lobster dinner, maybe. Yes, it’s quite a bit of hassle & I can understand why other sun-sensitive people would choose another type of vacation venue. But I love the smell and sound of the ocean, and I love to swim in it. I guess it satisfies some personal, primal need. Billie Piper’s autobiography? No kidding? That sounds perfect!___ Louis, I’m writing down Rhys Bowen, too. I have a weakness for Between-the-Wars settings. A current fave is Barbara Cleverley’s Joe Sandilands mysteries.___ Ingrid, I really liked Kate Ross. So sad that she died so young. __Priscilla, I’ve been reading Ashley Gardner. I agree with Linda that they can be a little grittier than I like, but as is the case with Anne Perry, setting and characters are compelling enough to keep me reading. But is Gardner still writing those mysteries? IIRC, there hasn’t been a new one for a couple of years.__Prisicilla, I am extremely fond of Inspector Barnaby–in the books and in the TV series. __Theo & Linda, Sayers is wonderful. Thank you for reminding me. She and Ngaio Marsh I can read over & over.

    Reply
  103. Tal, I was thinking about giving the Robinson books a try, what with my fascination with things Egyptian. And Saylor’s series also sounds like something I’d enjoy.___”This is so not me. I burn to a crisp after half an hour in the sun.” LOL, Janice. I, too, burn to a crisp. So I sit under an umbrella, wearing a hat, my skin thickly coated with #60 sunblock. Coverups usually get involved about an hour in. My polarized sunglasses take care of glare. At the Cape, sand flies tend to come out near dusk, at which time we’re heading away from beach and on to a lobster dinner, maybe. Yes, it’s quite a bit of hassle & I can understand why other sun-sensitive people would choose another type of vacation venue. But I love the smell and sound of the ocean, and I love to swim in it. I guess it satisfies some personal, primal need. Billie Piper’s autobiography? No kidding? That sounds perfect!___ Louis, I’m writing down Rhys Bowen, too. I have a weakness for Between-the-Wars settings. A current fave is Barbara Cleverley’s Joe Sandilands mysteries.___ Ingrid, I really liked Kate Ross. So sad that she died so young. __Priscilla, I’ve been reading Ashley Gardner. I agree with Linda that they can be a little grittier than I like, but as is the case with Anne Perry, setting and characters are compelling enough to keep me reading. But is Gardner still writing those mysteries? IIRC, there hasn’t been a new one for a couple of years.__Prisicilla, I am extremely fond of Inspector Barnaby–in the books and in the TV series. __Theo & Linda, Sayers is wonderful. Thank you for reminding me. She and Ngaio Marsh I can read over & over.

    Reply
  104. Tal, I was thinking about giving the Robinson books a try, what with my fascination with things Egyptian. And Saylor’s series also sounds like something I’d enjoy.___”This is so not me. I burn to a crisp after half an hour in the sun.” LOL, Janice. I, too, burn to a crisp. So I sit under an umbrella, wearing a hat, my skin thickly coated with #60 sunblock. Coverups usually get involved about an hour in. My polarized sunglasses take care of glare. At the Cape, sand flies tend to come out near dusk, at which time we’re heading away from beach and on to a lobster dinner, maybe. Yes, it’s quite a bit of hassle & I can understand why other sun-sensitive people would choose another type of vacation venue. But I love the smell and sound of the ocean, and I love to swim in it. I guess it satisfies some personal, primal need. Billie Piper’s autobiography? No kidding? That sounds perfect!___ Louis, I’m writing down Rhys Bowen, too. I have a weakness for Between-the-Wars settings. A current fave is Barbara Cleverley’s Joe Sandilands mysteries.___ Ingrid, I really liked Kate Ross. So sad that she died so young. __Priscilla, I’ve been reading Ashley Gardner. I agree with Linda that they can be a little grittier than I like, but as is the case with Anne Perry, setting and characters are compelling enough to keep me reading. But is Gardner still writing those mysteries? IIRC, there hasn’t been a new one for a couple of years.__Prisicilla, I am extremely fond of Inspector Barnaby–in the books and in the TV series. __Theo & Linda, Sayers is wonderful. Thank you for reminding me. She and Ngaio Marsh I can read over & over.

    Reply
  105. Tal, I was thinking about giving the Robinson books a try, what with my fascination with things Egyptian. And Saylor’s series also sounds like something I’d enjoy.___”This is so not me. I burn to a crisp after half an hour in the sun.” LOL, Janice. I, too, burn to a crisp. So I sit under an umbrella, wearing a hat, my skin thickly coated with #60 sunblock. Coverups usually get involved about an hour in. My polarized sunglasses take care of glare. At the Cape, sand flies tend to come out near dusk, at which time we’re heading away from beach and on to a lobster dinner, maybe. Yes, it’s quite a bit of hassle & I can understand why other sun-sensitive people would choose another type of vacation venue. But I love the smell and sound of the ocean, and I love to swim in it. I guess it satisfies some personal, primal need. Billie Piper’s autobiography? No kidding? That sounds perfect!___ Louis, I’m writing down Rhys Bowen, too. I have a weakness for Between-the-Wars settings. A current fave is Barbara Cleverley’s Joe Sandilands mysteries.___ Ingrid, I really liked Kate Ross. So sad that she died so young. __Priscilla, I’ve been reading Ashley Gardner. I agree with Linda that they can be a little grittier than I like, but as is the case with Anne Perry, setting and characters are compelling enough to keep me reading. But is Gardner still writing those mysteries? IIRC, there hasn’t been a new one for a couple of years.__Prisicilla, I am extremely fond of Inspector Barnaby–in the books and in the TV series. __Theo & Linda, Sayers is wonderful. Thank you for reminding me. She and Ngaio Marsh I can read over & over.

    Reply
  106. Loretta, I also like (contemporary) Val McDermid but she’s really gritty so I don’t know that you’d like her. But the Dr. Tony Hill/Chief Inspector Carol Jordan’s are excellent.
    And you probably didn’t see it, but thank you so much for the book! It was waiting for me when I got back from the beach! 😀
    I said thanks on the food thread, along with all the tongue recipes I posted because Jo wanted to know what disgus—-um, unusual things Romanians would have in a mid 1800’s recipe book.

    Reply
  107. Loretta, I also like (contemporary) Val McDermid but she’s really gritty so I don’t know that you’d like her. But the Dr. Tony Hill/Chief Inspector Carol Jordan’s are excellent.
    And you probably didn’t see it, but thank you so much for the book! It was waiting for me when I got back from the beach! 😀
    I said thanks on the food thread, along with all the tongue recipes I posted because Jo wanted to know what disgus—-um, unusual things Romanians would have in a mid 1800’s recipe book.

    Reply
  108. Loretta, I also like (contemporary) Val McDermid but she’s really gritty so I don’t know that you’d like her. But the Dr. Tony Hill/Chief Inspector Carol Jordan’s are excellent.
    And you probably didn’t see it, but thank you so much for the book! It was waiting for me when I got back from the beach! 😀
    I said thanks on the food thread, along with all the tongue recipes I posted because Jo wanted to know what disgus—-um, unusual things Romanians would have in a mid 1800’s recipe book.

    Reply
  109. Loretta, I also like (contemporary) Val McDermid but she’s really gritty so I don’t know that you’d like her. But the Dr. Tony Hill/Chief Inspector Carol Jordan’s are excellent.
    And you probably didn’t see it, but thank you so much for the book! It was waiting for me when I got back from the beach! 😀
    I said thanks on the food thread, along with all the tongue recipes I posted because Jo wanted to know what disgus—-um, unusual things Romanians would have in a mid 1800’s recipe book.

    Reply
  110. Loretta, I also like (contemporary) Val McDermid but she’s really gritty so I don’t know that you’d like her. But the Dr. Tony Hill/Chief Inspector Carol Jordan’s are excellent.
    And you probably didn’t see it, but thank you so much for the book! It was waiting for me when I got back from the beach! 😀
    I said thanks on the food thread, along with all the tongue recipes I posted because Jo wanted to know what disgus—-um, unusual things Romanians would have in a mid 1800’s recipe book.

    Reply
  111. Theo, you’re most welcome. Thanks for making me laugh so hard. Re murder–there’s gritty and there’s gritty, I find. I’ll just look into the pages and see if I’ll be OK with it. One thing I _really_ dislike are serial killers & sickos. What’s their motive? Insanity. Not interesting and so creepy. But where there’s motive and character and an interesting puzzle and a little bit of light or hope or something upbeat–I’m so there, whether it’s happening in Ancient Rome or contemporary Boston.

    Reply
  112. Theo, you’re most welcome. Thanks for making me laugh so hard. Re murder–there’s gritty and there’s gritty, I find. I’ll just look into the pages and see if I’ll be OK with it. One thing I _really_ dislike are serial killers & sickos. What’s their motive? Insanity. Not interesting and so creepy. But where there’s motive and character and an interesting puzzle and a little bit of light or hope or something upbeat–I’m so there, whether it’s happening in Ancient Rome or contemporary Boston.

    Reply
  113. Theo, you’re most welcome. Thanks for making me laugh so hard. Re murder–there’s gritty and there’s gritty, I find. I’ll just look into the pages and see if I’ll be OK with it. One thing I _really_ dislike are serial killers & sickos. What’s their motive? Insanity. Not interesting and so creepy. But where there’s motive and character and an interesting puzzle and a little bit of light or hope or something upbeat–I’m so there, whether it’s happening in Ancient Rome or contemporary Boston.

    Reply
  114. Theo, you’re most welcome. Thanks for making me laugh so hard. Re murder–there’s gritty and there’s gritty, I find. I’ll just look into the pages and see if I’ll be OK with it. One thing I _really_ dislike are serial killers & sickos. What’s their motive? Insanity. Not interesting and so creepy. But where there’s motive and character and an interesting puzzle and a little bit of light or hope or something upbeat–I’m so there, whether it’s happening in Ancient Rome or contemporary Boston.

    Reply
  115. Theo, you’re most welcome. Thanks for making me laugh so hard. Re murder–there’s gritty and there’s gritty, I find. I’ll just look into the pages and see if I’ll be OK with it. One thing I _really_ dislike are serial killers & sickos. What’s their motive? Insanity. Not interesting and so creepy. But where there’s motive and character and an interesting puzzle and a little bit of light or hope or something upbeat–I’m so there, whether it’s happening in Ancient Rome or contemporary Boston.

    Reply
  116. Loretta, speaking of between-the-wars, have you read Laurie King’s Mary Russell mysteries? They’re a great combination of mystery and adventure and have some of my favorite romantic moments (though it’s subtly done). King talks about Sayers as an influences and there are some lovely Sayers homages.

    Reply
  117. Loretta, speaking of between-the-wars, have you read Laurie King’s Mary Russell mysteries? They’re a great combination of mystery and adventure and have some of my favorite romantic moments (though it’s subtly done). King talks about Sayers as an influences and there are some lovely Sayers homages.

    Reply
  118. Loretta, speaking of between-the-wars, have you read Laurie King’s Mary Russell mysteries? They’re a great combination of mystery and adventure and have some of my favorite romantic moments (though it’s subtly done). King talks about Sayers as an influences and there are some lovely Sayers homages.

    Reply
  119. Loretta, speaking of between-the-wars, have you read Laurie King’s Mary Russell mysteries? They’re a great combination of mystery and adventure and have some of my favorite romantic moments (though it’s subtly done). King talks about Sayers as an influences and there are some lovely Sayers homages.

    Reply
  120. Loretta, speaking of between-the-wars, have you read Laurie King’s Mary Russell mysteries? They’re a great combination of mystery and adventure and have some of my favorite romantic moments (though it’s subtly done). King talks about Sayers as an influences and there are some lovely Sayers homages.

    Reply
  121. Tracy–excellent suggestion! I think King is marvelous. Ordinarily, I’m turned off by books that use famous fictional characters, but the Mary Russell mysteries are wonderfully done, so evocative of time and place, and her Sherlock Holmes never feels wrong or “adapted” to me. As one who fell in love with Dartmoor, I particularly appreciated The Moor.

    Reply
  122. Tracy–excellent suggestion! I think King is marvelous. Ordinarily, I’m turned off by books that use famous fictional characters, but the Mary Russell mysteries are wonderfully done, so evocative of time and place, and her Sherlock Holmes never feels wrong or “adapted” to me. As one who fell in love with Dartmoor, I particularly appreciated The Moor.

    Reply
  123. Tracy–excellent suggestion! I think King is marvelous. Ordinarily, I’m turned off by books that use famous fictional characters, but the Mary Russell mysteries are wonderfully done, so evocative of time and place, and her Sherlock Holmes never feels wrong or “adapted” to me. As one who fell in love with Dartmoor, I particularly appreciated The Moor.

    Reply
  124. Tracy–excellent suggestion! I think King is marvelous. Ordinarily, I’m turned off by books that use famous fictional characters, but the Mary Russell mysteries are wonderfully done, so evocative of time and place, and her Sherlock Holmes never feels wrong or “adapted” to me. As one who fell in love with Dartmoor, I particularly appreciated The Moor.

    Reply
  125. Tracy–excellent suggestion! I think King is marvelous. Ordinarily, I’m turned off by books that use famous fictional characters, but the Mary Russell mysteries are wonderfully done, so evocative of time and place, and her Sherlock Holmes never feels wrong or “adapted” to me. As one who fell in love with Dartmoor, I particularly appreciated The Moor.

    Reply
  126. Loretta, Val’s stories are more about the sicko/insanity type villain but the balance between the villain and the relationship between Tony and Carol are really well done. I’m not usually thrilled with the stereotypical ‘bad guy’ either. There usually is no motive for their actions, or very little, but Val does the whole book so well. And if you can start from the beginning of the Tony/Carol story, their on again, off again relationship takes a front seat to the bad guys. Does that make sense? Probably not.
    And I’m not a huge Michael Connelly fan, I can take or leave Harry Bosch, but his book, The Poet, was brilliant. At least I thought it was. Enough to keep it and read it again.

    Reply
  127. Loretta, Val’s stories are more about the sicko/insanity type villain but the balance between the villain and the relationship between Tony and Carol are really well done. I’m not usually thrilled with the stereotypical ‘bad guy’ either. There usually is no motive for their actions, or very little, but Val does the whole book so well. And if you can start from the beginning of the Tony/Carol story, their on again, off again relationship takes a front seat to the bad guys. Does that make sense? Probably not.
    And I’m not a huge Michael Connelly fan, I can take or leave Harry Bosch, but his book, The Poet, was brilliant. At least I thought it was. Enough to keep it and read it again.

    Reply
  128. Loretta, Val’s stories are more about the sicko/insanity type villain but the balance between the villain and the relationship between Tony and Carol are really well done. I’m not usually thrilled with the stereotypical ‘bad guy’ either. There usually is no motive for their actions, or very little, but Val does the whole book so well. And if you can start from the beginning of the Tony/Carol story, their on again, off again relationship takes a front seat to the bad guys. Does that make sense? Probably not.
    And I’m not a huge Michael Connelly fan, I can take or leave Harry Bosch, but his book, The Poet, was brilliant. At least I thought it was. Enough to keep it and read it again.

    Reply
  129. Loretta, Val’s stories are more about the sicko/insanity type villain but the balance between the villain and the relationship between Tony and Carol are really well done. I’m not usually thrilled with the stereotypical ‘bad guy’ either. There usually is no motive for their actions, or very little, but Val does the whole book so well. And if you can start from the beginning of the Tony/Carol story, their on again, off again relationship takes a front seat to the bad guys. Does that make sense? Probably not.
    And I’m not a huge Michael Connelly fan, I can take or leave Harry Bosch, but his book, The Poet, was brilliant. At least I thought it was. Enough to keep it and read it again.

    Reply
  130. Loretta, Val’s stories are more about the sicko/insanity type villain but the balance between the villain and the relationship between Tony and Carol are really well done. I’m not usually thrilled with the stereotypical ‘bad guy’ either. There usually is no motive for their actions, or very little, but Val does the whole book so well. And if you can start from the beginning of the Tony/Carol story, their on again, off again relationship takes a front seat to the bad guys. Does that make sense? Probably not.
    And I’m not a huge Michael Connelly fan, I can take or leave Harry Bosch, but his book, The Poet, was brilliant. At least I thought it was. Enough to keep it and read it again.

    Reply
  131. A favourite of mine is Arturo Perez-Reverte who writes mysteries – The FeNcing Master, The Flanders Panel, The Dumas Club among others.
    Also there is Tasha Alexander with her Lady Ashton books and a couple I would recommend that are not mysteries but have an Italian background are La Cucina and Nectar by Lily Prior if you can get hold of them. They are lush and wonderful and quirky. All sensual and full of passion and food similar to La Chocolat.

    Reply
  132. A favourite of mine is Arturo Perez-Reverte who writes mysteries – The FeNcing Master, The Flanders Panel, The Dumas Club among others.
    Also there is Tasha Alexander with her Lady Ashton books and a couple I would recommend that are not mysteries but have an Italian background are La Cucina and Nectar by Lily Prior if you can get hold of them. They are lush and wonderful and quirky. All sensual and full of passion and food similar to La Chocolat.

    Reply
  133. A favourite of mine is Arturo Perez-Reverte who writes mysteries – The FeNcing Master, The Flanders Panel, The Dumas Club among others.
    Also there is Tasha Alexander with her Lady Ashton books and a couple I would recommend that are not mysteries but have an Italian background are La Cucina and Nectar by Lily Prior if you can get hold of them. They are lush and wonderful and quirky. All sensual and full of passion and food similar to La Chocolat.

    Reply
  134. A favourite of mine is Arturo Perez-Reverte who writes mysteries – The FeNcing Master, The Flanders Panel, The Dumas Club among others.
    Also there is Tasha Alexander with her Lady Ashton books and a couple I would recommend that are not mysteries but have an Italian background are La Cucina and Nectar by Lily Prior if you can get hold of them. They are lush and wonderful and quirky. All sensual and full of passion and food similar to La Chocolat.

    Reply
  135. A favourite of mine is Arturo Perez-Reverte who writes mysteries – The FeNcing Master, The Flanders Panel, The Dumas Club among others.
    Also there is Tasha Alexander with her Lady Ashton books and a couple I would recommend that are not mysteries but have an Italian background are La Cucina and Nectar by Lily Prior if you can get hold of them. They are lush and wonderful and quirky. All sensual and full of passion and food similar to La Chocolat.

    Reply
  136. Oh, another couple I just thought of if you want mysteries that are a bit different – Poison Study and Magic Study but Maria Snyder. You need to read them in that order though.
    Enjoy your holiday, Loretta.

    Reply
  137. Oh, another couple I just thought of if you want mysteries that are a bit different – Poison Study and Magic Study but Maria Snyder. You need to read them in that order though.
    Enjoy your holiday, Loretta.

    Reply
  138. Oh, another couple I just thought of if you want mysteries that are a bit different – Poison Study and Magic Study but Maria Snyder. You need to read them in that order though.
    Enjoy your holiday, Loretta.

    Reply
  139. Oh, another couple I just thought of if you want mysteries that are a bit different – Poison Study and Magic Study but Maria Snyder. You need to read them in that order though.
    Enjoy your holiday, Loretta.

    Reply
  140. Oh, another couple I just thought of if you want mysteries that are a bit different – Poison Study and Magic Study but Maria Snyder. You need to read them in that order though.
    Enjoy your holiday, Loretta.

    Reply
  141. Kate Ross is great. Another short-lived but ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL mystery writer was Sarah Caudwell (yes, that’s the spelling), whose hilarious (pun intended) books revolve around a group of junior barristers at the Chancery and Treasury Bar (where they practice, not where they drink). Get the paperbacks; they have Edward Gorey covers!
    There is also Donna Andrews’s great funny series with bird titles, starting with MURDER WITH PEACOCKS.
    Loretta, I unfortunately inherited my redheaded mother’s complexion, but my father’s dark hair, so in the Arizona sun I burn literally in five minutes. He of course never burned; and my mother usually started gardening as soon as the frost was out of the ground when we lived farther north, so that by the time the sun was hot enough to do damage, she was already tanned (or as close to tanned as we ever got–terminally freckled).
    I love Laurie R. King’s Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes mysteries, but the one I tried about her other series character, Kate Martinelli, a lesbian S.F. homicide detective, I didn’t like at all. It was extremely depressing.
    Incidentally, Lord Peter won’t be showing up in any future Russell & Holmes stories, as she got a really nasty missive from the Sayers literary executors after the first time.
    Maria V. Snyder has a third book in the series, FIRE STUDY.
    And another great fantasy/mystery series is Michelle Sagara’s Chronicles of Elantra: CAST IN SHADOW, CAST IN COURTLIGHT, CAST IN SECRET. I think there’s another coming out soon. Heroine is a street cop in a world with five sentient races (humans are NOT at the top of the chain!).
    From her website:
    Cast in Fury, the fourth book in Cast series, will be published by Luna in October 2008, in trade paperback.
    Cast in Silence, the fifth book in the series, isn’t finished but will probably be published by Luna in late 2009. Note, the Cast books are quite different in tone from her Michelle West books, which is why she is publishing them under a different name.
    And a wonderful police-procedural fantasy is Diane Duane’s STEALING THE ELF-KING’S ROSES.

    Reply
  142. Kate Ross is great. Another short-lived but ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL mystery writer was Sarah Caudwell (yes, that’s the spelling), whose hilarious (pun intended) books revolve around a group of junior barristers at the Chancery and Treasury Bar (where they practice, not where they drink). Get the paperbacks; they have Edward Gorey covers!
    There is also Donna Andrews’s great funny series with bird titles, starting with MURDER WITH PEACOCKS.
    Loretta, I unfortunately inherited my redheaded mother’s complexion, but my father’s dark hair, so in the Arizona sun I burn literally in five minutes. He of course never burned; and my mother usually started gardening as soon as the frost was out of the ground when we lived farther north, so that by the time the sun was hot enough to do damage, she was already tanned (or as close to tanned as we ever got–terminally freckled).
    I love Laurie R. King’s Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes mysteries, but the one I tried about her other series character, Kate Martinelli, a lesbian S.F. homicide detective, I didn’t like at all. It was extremely depressing.
    Incidentally, Lord Peter won’t be showing up in any future Russell & Holmes stories, as she got a really nasty missive from the Sayers literary executors after the first time.
    Maria V. Snyder has a third book in the series, FIRE STUDY.
    And another great fantasy/mystery series is Michelle Sagara’s Chronicles of Elantra: CAST IN SHADOW, CAST IN COURTLIGHT, CAST IN SECRET. I think there’s another coming out soon. Heroine is a street cop in a world with five sentient races (humans are NOT at the top of the chain!).
    From her website:
    Cast in Fury, the fourth book in Cast series, will be published by Luna in October 2008, in trade paperback.
    Cast in Silence, the fifth book in the series, isn’t finished but will probably be published by Luna in late 2009. Note, the Cast books are quite different in tone from her Michelle West books, which is why she is publishing them under a different name.
    And a wonderful police-procedural fantasy is Diane Duane’s STEALING THE ELF-KING’S ROSES.

    Reply
  143. Kate Ross is great. Another short-lived but ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL mystery writer was Sarah Caudwell (yes, that’s the spelling), whose hilarious (pun intended) books revolve around a group of junior barristers at the Chancery and Treasury Bar (where they practice, not where they drink). Get the paperbacks; they have Edward Gorey covers!
    There is also Donna Andrews’s great funny series with bird titles, starting with MURDER WITH PEACOCKS.
    Loretta, I unfortunately inherited my redheaded mother’s complexion, but my father’s dark hair, so in the Arizona sun I burn literally in five minutes. He of course never burned; and my mother usually started gardening as soon as the frost was out of the ground when we lived farther north, so that by the time the sun was hot enough to do damage, she was already tanned (or as close to tanned as we ever got–terminally freckled).
    I love Laurie R. King’s Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes mysteries, but the one I tried about her other series character, Kate Martinelli, a lesbian S.F. homicide detective, I didn’t like at all. It was extremely depressing.
    Incidentally, Lord Peter won’t be showing up in any future Russell & Holmes stories, as she got a really nasty missive from the Sayers literary executors after the first time.
    Maria V. Snyder has a third book in the series, FIRE STUDY.
    And another great fantasy/mystery series is Michelle Sagara’s Chronicles of Elantra: CAST IN SHADOW, CAST IN COURTLIGHT, CAST IN SECRET. I think there’s another coming out soon. Heroine is a street cop in a world with five sentient races (humans are NOT at the top of the chain!).
    From her website:
    Cast in Fury, the fourth book in Cast series, will be published by Luna in October 2008, in trade paperback.
    Cast in Silence, the fifth book in the series, isn’t finished but will probably be published by Luna in late 2009. Note, the Cast books are quite different in tone from her Michelle West books, which is why she is publishing them under a different name.
    And a wonderful police-procedural fantasy is Diane Duane’s STEALING THE ELF-KING’S ROSES.

    Reply
  144. Kate Ross is great. Another short-lived but ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL mystery writer was Sarah Caudwell (yes, that’s the spelling), whose hilarious (pun intended) books revolve around a group of junior barristers at the Chancery and Treasury Bar (where they practice, not where they drink). Get the paperbacks; they have Edward Gorey covers!
    There is also Donna Andrews’s great funny series with bird titles, starting with MURDER WITH PEACOCKS.
    Loretta, I unfortunately inherited my redheaded mother’s complexion, but my father’s dark hair, so in the Arizona sun I burn literally in five minutes. He of course never burned; and my mother usually started gardening as soon as the frost was out of the ground when we lived farther north, so that by the time the sun was hot enough to do damage, she was already tanned (or as close to tanned as we ever got–terminally freckled).
    I love Laurie R. King’s Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes mysteries, but the one I tried about her other series character, Kate Martinelli, a lesbian S.F. homicide detective, I didn’t like at all. It was extremely depressing.
    Incidentally, Lord Peter won’t be showing up in any future Russell & Holmes stories, as she got a really nasty missive from the Sayers literary executors after the first time.
    Maria V. Snyder has a third book in the series, FIRE STUDY.
    And another great fantasy/mystery series is Michelle Sagara’s Chronicles of Elantra: CAST IN SHADOW, CAST IN COURTLIGHT, CAST IN SECRET. I think there’s another coming out soon. Heroine is a street cop in a world with five sentient races (humans are NOT at the top of the chain!).
    From her website:
    Cast in Fury, the fourth book in Cast series, will be published by Luna in October 2008, in trade paperback.
    Cast in Silence, the fifth book in the series, isn’t finished but will probably be published by Luna in late 2009. Note, the Cast books are quite different in tone from her Michelle West books, which is why she is publishing them under a different name.
    And a wonderful police-procedural fantasy is Diane Duane’s STEALING THE ELF-KING’S ROSES.

    Reply
  145. Kate Ross is great. Another short-lived but ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL mystery writer was Sarah Caudwell (yes, that’s the spelling), whose hilarious (pun intended) books revolve around a group of junior barristers at the Chancery and Treasury Bar (where they practice, not where they drink). Get the paperbacks; they have Edward Gorey covers!
    There is also Donna Andrews’s great funny series with bird titles, starting with MURDER WITH PEACOCKS.
    Loretta, I unfortunately inherited my redheaded mother’s complexion, but my father’s dark hair, so in the Arizona sun I burn literally in five minutes. He of course never burned; and my mother usually started gardening as soon as the frost was out of the ground when we lived farther north, so that by the time the sun was hot enough to do damage, she was already tanned (or as close to tanned as we ever got–terminally freckled).
    I love Laurie R. King’s Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes mysteries, but the one I tried about her other series character, Kate Martinelli, a lesbian S.F. homicide detective, I didn’t like at all. It was extremely depressing.
    Incidentally, Lord Peter won’t be showing up in any future Russell & Holmes stories, as she got a really nasty missive from the Sayers literary executors after the first time.
    Maria V. Snyder has a third book in the series, FIRE STUDY.
    And another great fantasy/mystery series is Michelle Sagara’s Chronicles of Elantra: CAST IN SHADOW, CAST IN COURTLIGHT, CAST IN SECRET. I think there’s another coming out soon. Heroine is a street cop in a world with five sentient races (humans are NOT at the top of the chain!).
    From her website:
    Cast in Fury, the fourth book in Cast series, will be published by Luna in October 2008, in trade paperback.
    Cast in Silence, the fifth book in the series, isn’t finished but will probably be published by Luna in late 2009. Note, the Cast books are quite different in tone from her Michelle West books, which is why she is publishing them under a different name.
    And a wonderful police-procedural fantasy is Diane Duane’s STEALING THE ELF-KING’S ROSES.

    Reply
  146. Hi Loretta,
    Have you tried the Sebastian St. Cyr regency-set mysteries by CS Harris (otherwise known as Candice Proctor)? The first one is called “What Angels Fear.” I believe she describes Sebastian as “Mr Darcy with a James Bond edge.” I really enjoyed them.
    And for all who burn and sweat and jostle on the beach, I encourage you to try a beach in Oregon or Washington! It’s heaven–scenic, uncrowded, cool (sometimes foggy and drizzly),low-key– rocks, cliffs, tide-pools– great for walking and sunsets and soaking up the sights and sounds of the ocean. Here’s a photo for you:
    http://tinyurl.com/6oz2gk
    Loretta, have a great vacation!

    Reply
  147. Hi Loretta,
    Have you tried the Sebastian St. Cyr regency-set mysteries by CS Harris (otherwise known as Candice Proctor)? The first one is called “What Angels Fear.” I believe she describes Sebastian as “Mr Darcy with a James Bond edge.” I really enjoyed them.
    And for all who burn and sweat and jostle on the beach, I encourage you to try a beach in Oregon or Washington! It’s heaven–scenic, uncrowded, cool (sometimes foggy and drizzly),low-key– rocks, cliffs, tide-pools– great for walking and sunsets and soaking up the sights and sounds of the ocean. Here’s a photo for you:
    http://tinyurl.com/6oz2gk
    Loretta, have a great vacation!

    Reply
  148. Hi Loretta,
    Have you tried the Sebastian St. Cyr regency-set mysteries by CS Harris (otherwise known as Candice Proctor)? The first one is called “What Angels Fear.” I believe she describes Sebastian as “Mr Darcy with a James Bond edge.” I really enjoyed them.
    And for all who burn and sweat and jostle on the beach, I encourage you to try a beach in Oregon or Washington! It’s heaven–scenic, uncrowded, cool (sometimes foggy and drizzly),low-key– rocks, cliffs, tide-pools– great for walking and sunsets and soaking up the sights and sounds of the ocean. Here’s a photo for you:
    http://tinyurl.com/6oz2gk
    Loretta, have a great vacation!

    Reply
  149. Hi Loretta,
    Have you tried the Sebastian St. Cyr regency-set mysteries by CS Harris (otherwise known as Candice Proctor)? The first one is called “What Angels Fear.” I believe she describes Sebastian as “Mr Darcy with a James Bond edge.” I really enjoyed them.
    And for all who burn and sweat and jostle on the beach, I encourage you to try a beach in Oregon or Washington! It’s heaven–scenic, uncrowded, cool (sometimes foggy and drizzly),low-key– rocks, cliffs, tide-pools– great for walking and sunsets and soaking up the sights and sounds of the ocean. Here’s a photo for you:
    http://tinyurl.com/6oz2gk
    Loretta, have a great vacation!

    Reply
  150. Hi Loretta,
    Have you tried the Sebastian St. Cyr regency-set mysteries by CS Harris (otherwise known as Candice Proctor)? The first one is called “What Angels Fear.” I believe she describes Sebastian as “Mr Darcy with a James Bond edge.” I really enjoyed them.
    And for all who burn and sweat and jostle on the beach, I encourage you to try a beach in Oregon or Washington! It’s heaven–scenic, uncrowded, cool (sometimes foggy and drizzly),low-key– rocks, cliffs, tide-pools– great for walking and sunsets and soaking up the sights and sounds of the ocean. Here’s a photo for you:
    http://tinyurl.com/6oz2gk
    Loretta, have a great vacation!

    Reply
  151. For summer vacation this year I seem to have preferred fun, flirty, sweet contemporaries. I recently read Natural Born Charmer by Susan Elizabeth Phillips, Not Another Bad Date by Rachel Gibson, and Just One of the Guys by Kristan Higgins. I just started Key of Sea by Mary Stella who is a new author for me.
    After this one, I think I will pick a few historicals. By the way, Loretta, Your Scandalous Ways was a wonderful book. I thoroughly enjoyed it!

    Reply
  152. For summer vacation this year I seem to have preferred fun, flirty, sweet contemporaries. I recently read Natural Born Charmer by Susan Elizabeth Phillips, Not Another Bad Date by Rachel Gibson, and Just One of the Guys by Kristan Higgins. I just started Key of Sea by Mary Stella who is a new author for me.
    After this one, I think I will pick a few historicals. By the way, Loretta, Your Scandalous Ways was a wonderful book. I thoroughly enjoyed it!

    Reply
  153. For summer vacation this year I seem to have preferred fun, flirty, sweet contemporaries. I recently read Natural Born Charmer by Susan Elizabeth Phillips, Not Another Bad Date by Rachel Gibson, and Just One of the Guys by Kristan Higgins. I just started Key of Sea by Mary Stella who is a new author for me.
    After this one, I think I will pick a few historicals. By the way, Loretta, Your Scandalous Ways was a wonderful book. I thoroughly enjoyed it!

    Reply
  154. For summer vacation this year I seem to have preferred fun, flirty, sweet contemporaries. I recently read Natural Born Charmer by Susan Elizabeth Phillips, Not Another Bad Date by Rachel Gibson, and Just One of the Guys by Kristan Higgins. I just started Key of Sea by Mary Stella who is a new author for me.
    After this one, I think I will pick a few historicals. By the way, Loretta, Your Scandalous Ways was a wonderful book. I thoroughly enjoyed it!

    Reply
  155. For summer vacation this year I seem to have preferred fun, flirty, sweet contemporaries. I recently read Natural Born Charmer by Susan Elizabeth Phillips, Not Another Bad Date by Rachel Gibson, and Just One of the Guys by Kristan Higgins. I just started Key of Sea by Mary Stella who is a new author for me.
    After this one, I think I will pick a few historicals. By the way, Loretta, Your Scandalous Ways was a wonderful book. I thoroughly enjoyed it!

    Reply
  156. Alison, Tal, RevMelinda, Cheryl C–I’ve written it all down. I think I’ve now got enough books for the next six vacations. And what’s wrong with that? It’s amazing how many of the authors I hadn’t heard of–or maybe not so amazing. One finds a comfort zone, and needs to be lured out. I love the variety, especially. I’m so looking forward to discovering these new-to-me authors. __Cheryl C, thank you! I had a great time writing that book–as my blogs may have indicated– and I’ve hoped readers would have a good time with it, too.

    Reply
  157. Alison, Tal, RevMelinda, Cheryl C–I’ve written it all down. I think I’ve now got enough books for the next six vacations. And what’s wrong with that? It’s amazing how many of the authors I hadn’t heard of–or maybe not so amazing. One finds a comfort zone, and needs to be lured out. I love the variety, especially. I’m so looking forward to discovering these new-to-me authors. __Cheryl C, thank you! I had a great time writing that book–as my blogs may have indicated– and I’ve hoped readers would have a good time with it, too.

    Reply
  158. Alison, Tal, RevMelinda, Cheryl C–I’ve written it all down. I think I’ve now got enough books for the next six vacations. And what’s wrong with that? It’s amazing how many of the authors I hadn’t heard of–or maybe not so amazing. One finds a comfort zone, and needs to be lured out. I love the variety, especially. I’m so looking forward to discovering these new-to-me authors. __Cheryl C, thank you! I had a great time writing that book–as my blogs may have indicated– and I’ve hoped readers would have a good time with it, too.

    Reply
  159. Alison, Tal, RevMelinda, Cheryl C–I’ve written it all down. I think I’ve now got enough books for the next six vacations. And what’s wrong with that? It’s amazing how many of the authors I hadn’t heard of–or maybe not so amazing. One finds a comfort zone, and needs to be lured out. I love the variety, especially. I’m so looking forward to discovering these new-to-me authors. __Cheryl C, thank you! I had a great time writing that book–as my blogs may have indicated– and I’ve hoped readers would have a good time with it, too.

    Reply
  160. Alison, Tal, RevMelinda, Cheryl C–I’ve written it all down. I think I’ve now got enough books for the next six vacations. And what’s wrong with that? It’s amazing how many of the authors I hadn’t heard of–or maybe not so amazing. One finds a comfort zone, and needs to be lured out. I love the variety, especially. I’m so looking forward to discovering these new-to-me authors. __Cheryl C, thank you! I had a great time writing that book–as my blogs may have indicated– and I’ve hoped readers would have a good time with it, too.

    Reply
  161. Loretta, if you’re in the mood for Ancient Egypt-set mysteries, have you tried Lauren Haney’s Lieutenant Bak series? Set in the era of Queen Hatshepsut, he’s a young officer who was too good at his job, so he was sent down to the southern border area to be out of sign & out of mind. Very atmospheric.

    Reply
  162. Loretta, if you’re in the mood for Ancient Egypt-set mysteries, have you tried Lauren Haney’s Lieutenant Bak series? Set in the era of Queen Hatshepsut, he’s a young officer who was too good at his job, so he was sent down to the southern border area to be out of sign & out of mind. Very atmospheric.

    Reply
  163. Loretta, if you’re in the mood for Ancient Egypt-set mysteries, have you tried Lauren Haney’s Lieutenant Bak series? Set in the era of Queen Hatshepsut, he’s a young officer who was too good at his job, so he was sent down to the southern border area to be out of sign & out of mind. Very atmospheric.

    Reply
  164. Loretta, if you’re in the mood for Ancient Egypt-set mysteries, have you tried Lauren Haney’s Lieutenant Bak series? Set in the era of Queen Hatshepsut, he’s a young officer who was too good at his job, so he was sent down to the southern border area to be out of sign & out of mind. Very atmospheric.

    Reply
  165. Loretta, if you’re in the mood for Ancient Egypt-set mysteries, have you tried Lauren Haney’s Lieutenant Bak series? Set in the era of Queen Hatshepsut, he’s a young officer who was too good at his job, so he was sent down to the southern border area to be out of sign & out of mind. Very atmospheric.

    Reply
  166. Two excellent mystery writers I’ve discovered fairly recently are Andrea Camilleri, an Italian author whose detective is a food-loving, kindly Sicilian; and Julia Spencer-Fleming, whose detectives are the female priest of an upstate NY Episcopalian Church and the police chief of the town. Neither are too grim; both have a sense of humor and are well-written and well-plotted; just all around good books. I’m also enjoying James Swain’s series about a retired-cop PI who specializes in catching people who are cheating in casinos–a very interesting arena. Fascinating stuff.

    Reply
  167. Two excellent mystery writers I’ve discovered fairly recently are Andrea Camilleri, an Italian author whose detective is a food-loving, kindly Sicilian; and Julia Spencer-Fleming, whose detectives are the female priest of an upstate NY Episcopalian Church and the police chief of the town. Neither are too grim; both have a sense of humor and are well-written and well-plotted; just all around good books. I’m also enjoying James Swain’s series about a retired-cop PI who specializes in catching people who are cheating in casinos–a very interesting arena. Fascinating stuff.

    Reply
  168. Two excellent mystery writers I’ve discovered fairly recently are Andrea Camilleri, an Italian author whose detective is a food-loving, kindly Sicilian; and Julia Spencer-Fleming, whose detectives are the female priest of an upstate NY Episcopalian Church and the police chief of the town. Neither are too grim; both have a sense of humor and are well-written and well-plotted; just all around good books. I’m also enjoying James Swain’s series about a retired-cop PI who specializes in catching people who are cheating in casinos–a very interesting arena. Fascinating stuff.

    Reply
  169. Two excellent mystery writers I’ve discovered fairly recently are Andrea Camilleri, an Italian author whose detective is a food-loving, kindly Sicilian; and Julia Spencer-Fleming, whose detectives are the female priest of an upstate NY Episcopalian Church and the police chief of the town. Neither are too grim; both have a sense of humor and are well-written and well-plotted; just all around good books. I’m also enjoying James Swain’s series about a retired-cop PI who specializes in catching people who are cheating in casinos–a very interesting arena. Fascinating stuff.

    Reply
  170. Two excellent mystery writers I’ve discovered fairly recently are Andrea Camilleri, an Italian author whose detective is a food-loving, kindly Sicilian; and Julia Spencer-Fleming, whose detectives are the female priest of an upstate NY Episcopalian Church and the police chief of the town. Neither are too grim; both have a sense of humor and are well-written and well-plotted; just all around good books. I’m also enjoying James Swain’s series about a retired-cop PI who specializes in catching people who are cheating in casinos–a very interesting arena. Fascinating stuff.

    Reply
  171. Fabulous view of Skye, Tal. We spent a little time there many years ago (when travel was more affordable) and it really was the most atmospheric place.___ Elaine, those are very enticing suggestions. I’ve put them on my list. I need a much longer vacation!

    Reply
  172. Fabulous view of Skye, Tal. We spent a little time there many years ago (when travel was more affordable) and it really was the most atmospheric place.___ Elaine, those are very enticing suggestions. I’ve put them on my list. I need a much longer vacation!

    Reply
  173. Fabulous view of Skye, Tal. We spent a little time there many years ago (when travel was more affordable) and it really was the most atmospheric place.___ Elaine, those are very enticing suggestions. I’ve put them on my list. I need a much longer vacation!

    Reply
  174. Fabulous view of Skye, Tal. We spent a little time there many years ago (when travel was more affordable) and it really was the most atmospheric place.___ Elaine, those are very enticing suggestions. I’ve put them on my list. I need a much longer vacation!

    Reply
  175. Fabulous view of Skye, Tal. We spent a little time there many years ago (when travel was more affordable) and it really was the most atmospheric place.___ Elaine, those are very enticing suggestions. I’ve put them on my list. I need a much longer vacation!

    Reply
  176. Jasper Fforde – Lost in a Good Book
    Terri Garey – A Match Made in Hell
    Carl Hiaasen – Nature Girl
    Elizabeth Peters – Tomb of the Golden Bird
    Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child – The Wheel of Darkness
    Of course I’ll be swapping and stealing books from Loretta and the other sisters.

    Reply
  177. Jasper Fforde – Lost in a Good Book
    Terri Garey – A Match Made in Hell
    Carl Hiaasen – Nature Girl
    Elizabeth Peters – Tomb of the Golden Bird
    Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child – The Wheel of Darkness
    Of course I’ll be swapping and stealing books from Loretta and the other sisters.

    Reply
  178. Jasper Fforde – Lost in a Good Book
    Terri Garey – A Match Made in Hell
    Carl Hiaasen – Nature Girl
    Elizabeth Peters – Tomb of the Golden Bird
    Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child – The Wheel of Darkness
    Of course I’ll be swapping and stealing books from Loretta and the other sisters.

    Reply
  179. Jasper Fforde – Lost in a Good Book
    Terri Garey – A Match Made in Hell
    Carl Hiaasen – Nature Girl
    Elizabeth Peters – Tomb of the Golden Bird
    Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child – The Wheel of Darkness
    Of course I’ll be swapping and stealing books from Loretta and the other sisters.

    Reply
  180. Jasper Fforde – Lost in a Good Book
    Terri Garey – A Match Made in Hell
    Carl Hiaasen – Nature Girl
    Elizabeth Peters – Tomb of the Golden Bird
    Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child – The Wheel of Darkness
    Of course I’ll be swapping and stealing books from Loretta and the other sisters.

    Reply

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